Ken and Tanya's Decision ... Treatment finally decided

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Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 10/30/2006 7:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi everyone, glad I found this forum. Have been reading around a little bit as well as reading all over the web just to get a handle on this.


My significant other has just gotten positive results back from his needle biopsy. We haven't met with the urologist yet, just got a phone call today and are going to set up a meeting with him.



This is what i know so far:



PSA 3.7 (up from 3.4 one year ago)



They took ten needle samples. (he has had two previous biopsies in two previous years, both negative)


This time one on the right side was positive, 5% cancerous.



Dr. didn't tell my bf the Gleason score (didn't even know what that was until today from web reading), but said it appeared of the "slow growing" type.



He just turned 63, very good health (except for a sprained ankle he just got last week on our first week out skiing). He does take blood pressure medication, which has been very well controlled with medication. His dad also had prostate cancer, died at 82.



I am just in the first stages of trying to learn as much as possible. I have printed out lists of questions to ask his urologist at our meeting. But everything just seems so confusing re: treatments, etc. Any advice on things to ask that might be overlooked on some of the internet lists? or any other advice?



Thanks in advance,

Tanya


Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided

Post Edited (Izzyblizzy) : 1/16/2007 2:33:11 PM (GMT-7)


aus
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 211
   Posted 10/31/2006 4:18 AM (GMT -7)   
At 60 years of age, majority of men have microscopic cancer cells

GreenAcres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 474
   Posted 10/31/2006 6:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi, Izzy/Tanya. My husb. is very similar in stats - age, blood pressure meds, originally 1 cell 10% positive. However, the difference was the rate of change in the PSA - his was going up rapidly. While most prostate cancers are very slow-growing, his seemed to just explode on the scene in the time from biopsy to pathology. My only point is that your bf has many options, which is great and all the more confusing!

The Gleason can be very confusing - if you go back through threads, Swimon and a few others have put it in plain English for the rest of us.

Sounds like you're way ahead of the game with researching and asking questions. That's where you have to start, then it begins to narrow down from there. BTW, following diagnosis, about every third day, my husband stated he was going to do "watchful waiting," which, in our case, scared the daylights out of me. By the next morning, he'd get back to "normal." As in, let's do something about this now. This may be a phase you'll experience.
Husband age 65
PSA on 5/1: 4.2 (doubled in 13 mos.; up to 4.3 on 6/1)
DaVinci Surgery 8/2/06
T2a (at biopsy)
T4c (at pathology) w/cancer cell leakage into fatty tissue
Post-Surgical PSA on 10/3/06 - undetectable!
Future: PSA tests twice-yearly


spinbiscuit
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Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 818
   Posted 10/31/2006 7:11 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Tanya,

Your husband has been early diagnosed, and I'm guessing the urologist will say you all have some time to do research. One of the factors that may affect a choice of treatment is the area you live in. Big cities; New York, LA, Chicago, Boston, etc. all have many fine doctors representing all of the latest in PCa treatments, and scheduling a procedure is going to be easier as well. I believe that the skill and experience of the doctor are the most important things to consider, and then the technique.

I live in the Washington DC/Baltimore metro area so I had all the choices of treatments and urologists. Like your husband I was diagnosed with early stage PCa: 2 of 14 cores @ 10%, Gleason 6 (3+3), PSA went from 2.2 to 3.8 in 14 months, negative scans/and boundaries, neg. DRE, and at that time I was 60 yrs. old.
After much researching we selected the DaVinci procedure here at the Geo. Washington Univ. Hospital.

The important thing for you to know is that all techniques offer excellent results, and statisticly they are equally successful. The decission will be which procedure you feel is best suited for your needs, and which doctor you have the most confident in. I wish you both the best of luck in your research, and please keep asking questions.

Glen

Tamu
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Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 626
   Posted 10/31/2006 7:33 AM (GMT -7)   
Izzyblizzy,

I am 56 and will be having a Da Vinci tomorrow. My PSA had increased from 3.2 to 4.3 in six months. My biopsy indciated 1 of 10 core samples with 40% cancer and a Gleason of 3+3. The Gleason score is very important. The most common Gleason score is a 6 with scores going up to 10(very aggressive) and down to 4(very slow growing). If I was 63 when diagnosed and I had a Gleason of 4 or 5 and 1 of 10 core samples with 5% I would have to think hard about treatment. You did not mention why the previous two biopsys were done but I assume that his PSA was continuing to change. The most important thing for you to know is that with a slow growing PCa you have time to research and educate yourself before making a treatment decision. If you read the post on this site you will note that the majority of men with PCa did not go with a local urologist but sought out ones with lots of experience. The path you are on will not be straight forward and before you get to the point of making a decision you will become very confused by the choices of treatment. The caring members that post on this site will most likely be your best source of information. Welcome to the site and may your journey be successful.

Tamu

Swimom
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Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 10/31/2006 9:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Tamu...you are a pretty amazing guy! All nerved up and still the advocate for others today :>)

Swimom
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Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 10/31/2006 9:41 AM (GMT -7)   
Tanya,

Your guy is a good example of a man who can do watch and wait for a good while. His PSA is moving slowly enough at this point that he could easily consider diet and observation.

Hang in there and keep watchng the show. It isn't Disney and sometimes gets a little R rated but not bad for the cast of characters involved ;>)

Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 10/31/2006 12:15 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi,

Thanks for all your responses.  To answer some of your questions.  Yes, he had the previous biopsies because his psa was 4.0 two years ago (and his dad had a history of it), but no positive results on biopsy.  Then it went down to 3.4 last year, but they still did a biopsy.  This year it was back up to 3.7, and they did the biopsy and got the one postive needle result.

These have all been done by his urologist that he has had for three years.  We have a consult with him on the 9th to discuss options.  He also metioned that he is doing a national study on Avodart for slowing growth of prostate cancer, so that is another option if we choose the "wait and watch route."  (although it appears to me it is a double blind study, so he wouldn't know if he actually got the treatment or not, need to ask him more questions about that.)  

We live in Colorado (Denver) area.  I know the urologist he has now does do surgery, but have to find out more about his record, etc.  Don't believe he does that Da Vinci thing, although looked at that site and there are several doctors that do do it around here. 

Guess will just keep researching until our meeting on the 9th where will find out more.  How do you go about researching doctors, is it word of mouth or is there a good site out there??

Anyway thanks for the welcome everyone!

Tanya (and Ken)

Swimom
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Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 10/31/2006 12:44 PM (GMT -7)   
Tanya,
Isn't Denver are where Proton Beam Therapy is now available? Also, I believe Dr. Joel Kaplan is in Colorado. He's a thought perhaps. You could also look on the divinci.com site and see some of the recognised Doc's doing robotic. Where there is one Uro there's usually plenty more! Kinda like birds of a feather! Good luck, Swim

Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 10/31/2006 12:58 PM (GMT -7)   

hi!

I know nothing about proton beam therapy, but will look it up.

A quick search didn't reveal a Joel Kaplan, (maybe Joel Kaufman? Urologist in Aurora?) but I will look into it more.

Current urologist is Lawrence Karsh, with Western Urologic Association if anyone knows anything about him.

Thanks, will look into these tips!

Tanya


Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 11/10/2006 11:31 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi all!
 
Well, update on the consult with our Urolgist yesterday.
 
Still don't know what we are going to do as far as treatment, but had a consult with the diagnosing Urologist yesterday.
 
He does open nerve-sparring surgeries (does about 60-70 a year), but gave us the name of two of his partners for exploring robotic (the guy he is referring us to has done about 400 davinci's) and an urolgic oncologist specialist.
 
He assures we have lots of time to decide.  In the meantime we are going to do Avodart, has anyone tried this?  (his doc is doing a clinical study on it, but we are not enrolling in that cause it is double-blind). Doc says it can't hurt anything.  And would shrink the prostate so that any future biopsies would cover "more" of the prostate.  (he only had one sample out of 10 with 5% cancerous).
 
We are considering trying Avodart for three months, doing another PSA, and then probably another biopsy before committing to surgery.  But still have those couple other consults to do first, before really deciding.  Any thoughts on that course of action?
 
Just an update and thanks for any thoughts or opinions,
Tanya (and Ken)
Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided


Tamu
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Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 626
   Posted 11/10/2006 12:29 PM (GMT -7)   

Tanya,

Sounds like a very good plan.  I did not have any of the enlarged prostate symptons but when my prostate was removed last week the suregon said that it was enlarged and it took a little longer to get it out.  I have a friend that went on the Avodart and it completely eliminated all of his problems.  If you do decide to go the surgery route a smaller prostate will only help and probably improve the continency and potency chances.  You have plenty of time so do your research and get comfortable with a decision.  Good Luck!!

Tamu


Diagnosed 7/6/06
1 of 10 core samples, 40%
Stage T1c, Gleason 3+3
Da Vinci on 11/01/06
56 Years Old


Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 11/10/2006 1:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the words of encouragement Tamu.  Hope everything is going well for you since your surgery.
 
about your friend that took it?  Was he taking it once he had a cancer diagonsis or pre-cancer with enlarged prostate?
 
Tanya
Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 11/10/2006 1:35 PM (GMT -7)   
Tanya,
It is entirely possible that your SO has years before he needs treatment. His PSA doubling time is still quite long. The only thing that dictates close monitoring is the location...the apex. The apex is the most likely place for escape but he's got lots of time, like his Doc said. Good Luck.
Swim

Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 11/10/2006 2:07 PM (GMT -7)   

thanks for your response swimom :)

the doctor also said that because it is at the apex, that the nerve bundles on the right side might not be saved, but they would save the left ones.

Do you know anything about it being located in an apex, that it might have a negative impact on saving the nerves on that side?


Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided


Tamu
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 626
   Posted 11/10/2006 3:05 PM (GMT -7)   
Tanya,

My friend is taking it for a non cancerous enlarged prostate. He has had two biopsies because his PSA was around 8.0 but both have turned out negative. After starting the Avodart his PSA has come down to around 3.0.

Tamu
Diagnosed 7/6/06
1 of 10 core samples, 40%
Stage T1c, Gleason 3+3
Da Vinci on 11/01/06
56 Years Old


aus
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 211
   Posted 11/10/2006 5:52 PM (GMT -7)   
My situation is similar, my PC is small and probably indolent.
 
Personally, I would not even consider "Avodart" unless there is some compelling reason to do so. It has mixed results from trials and potential side effects.
 
I don't know if your slides have been reviewed by a 2nd establishment as yet.
Biopsy analysis is very subjective. As your cancer percentage was very small, a second review of the slides should be done, especially as you are considering agressive treatment based on this reading.  They could be sent to Jon Epstein at Johns Hopkins or Memorial Sloan Kettering CC.
 
Dr Peter Scardino's book has  information on these subjects, nerve sparing and graft, nomograms on indolent cancers, importance of selecting your surgeon, open surgery V laparoscopic, and verious other aspects.
 
Reading it is very worthwhile for someone considering surgery or treatment.
 
John

Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 11/10/2006 6:54 PM (GMT -7)   

hi aus,

yes, they acually have had four opinions, three at the original lab and then sent out for a second second opinion at John Hopkin's.  All agreed.

I am interested in hearing about the side effects of avodart?  I have heard decrease in libido and some breast tenderness.  anything more serious?

We have the Walsh book and another one that is "surviving prostate cancer without surgery", but haven't ordered the one you recommend.  I will look into it.

Thanks,

Tanya


Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided


aus
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 211
   Posted 11/11/2006 5:20 AM (GMT -7)   

Tanya,

AVODART (Dutasteride) / related  Finasteride: Potential side effects include decrease in libido, impotence and allergic reactions.

My recollection is that a trial produced some unusual results, and while there  was a reduction of cancer in men taking finasteride, a high proportion of men taking it developed agressive cancers. There have been theories to rationalise this, but some are circumspect about it's use.

I realise most medications and treatments have possible side effects and that it's a matter of considering the upside and downside.

Avodart could be worth consideration for someone with severe BPH symptoms. Personally I would not use it as I can't see any great advantages apart from that, and there are known side effects with some doubtful aspects.

Regarding Proton Therapy mentioned here, the website www.protonbob.com has stories from lots of men who have been to Loma Linda. Bob gave me contact details for seven men who live near me who have had treatment there. All replied to me by email or phone and they were all very positive about their results and time there.

John

 

 

 

 

 


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 11/11/2006 7:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Tanya,

80% of prostate cancers originate at the apex. It is the thinnest part of the organ and close to the nerve bundles where cells love to migrate.
Selenium 200mg a day is showing some real promise in slowing (not ridding) tumor growth. There is even some evidence that it will reduce tumor burdens in some cancers, PCa included. Modified Citrus Pectin may also be a great cancer fighter and is currently being used in several trials. Check some of the sites I gave to MCBC (?) and try Life Extension. If he (SO) needs Adovart because his prostate is causing him difficulites...do it! Pain isn't much fun. He can decide for himself what he wants.

5% at one location is a pretty good sign and yeah, if it is really close to the margine near a nerve, one will have to go. Make certain it IS though. An intraoperative biopsy is pretty standard at the apex site. Make sure his surgeon NEEDS, not wants to remove a nerve. Also check to see if a sural nerve graft is available should the nerve need to go. There are still options in otherwords!

Be Well,
Swim

Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 11/11/2006 4:03 PM (GMT -7)   

hi swimom,

yes, my bf has been doing the selinium, citrus thing, and pomegranate juice for about three years ago, ever since his first biopsy.  We also distill our own water, although he had stopped doing that for about maybe 8 months before this last biopsy, but has just started doing it again. He bought this weird distiller machine to make "more oxygenated" water, about three years ago.  Don't know if it works, but i drink it too. 

We will look into that life extension supplement more.  Thanks for the tip.

Tanya


Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 11/11/2006 4:14 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi Tanya & Ken  *IzzyBlizzy    :-)  

 

Sending a warm welcome ~ to you! 

Thank you for continuing to keep us up to date on your journey.  Each stepping-stone is a learning stone.

 

I hope Ken’s sprained ankle is doing better!   You had quite a blizzard up near Evergreen a few weeks back.  Where do you ski??  Buddy’s sister & her husband lived in Aurora and moved to Evergreen a few years back and are now retired to the area.  We were there in August….. absolutely beautiful!!  Aurora has really grown in the past 6 years…

 

We will continue to keep you in our thoughts and prayers…In New Friendship,  Lee & Buddy

 

P.S  Your member name …. IzzyBlizzy  makes me smile    tongue  

 

"GOD Bless You"

 

It's a little prayer "GOD Bless You"...

but it means so much each day,

It means may angels guard you

and guide you on your way. 

                                 ~author unknown~

 

 

Our Personal Threads:

 If you pull 1 thing from our journey that helps you on your journey…… it will truly make our hearts happy!!! 

Our Journey ~ Sharing is Caring, A Special Note for Loved Ones (Wives, Partners, & Caregivers), Give Yourself a Second Opinion, and Murphy ~ Our Special Helper.

To quickest way to find them  is to change the way you look for Threads…  I have mine set at Last Comment.  If you go in and change it to Started By and look for Bluebird (pages 4 & 5 as of Nov-10 ‘06)…. You will find them a lot easier!


mama bluebird - Lee & Buddy… 53 on surgery day

RRP April 3, 2006   PSA 4.6 Gleason  3+3=6  T2a   Confined to Prostate

June 29th PSA Less than 0.1 Non-detectable


Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 11/11/2006 5:25 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Bluebird,
 
Thank you for the welcome :)  We live very near Evergreen, in Genesee.  Two exits from Evergreen.
 
We usually ski in Breckenridge or Vail, depends.  This was at Arapahoe Basin cause it was one of the first open.   
 
His ankle is doing much better! turned in the crutches about a week ago.  still a bit of pain but MUCH better.  Don't think we will be skiing for a while though :(  although maybe we can get a few good runs in between ankle fully healed and any treatment we decide. 
 
Izzyblizzy is from my old cats Izzy and Blizzy, both white balls of fur :)  one looked like a blizzard (blizzy) fat, furry, and tearing around, other was his little brother, a minature blizzy (the runt of the litter), thus izzy :)
 
have enjoyed your posts on here, hope you all continue to be well :)
 
Tanya (and Ken)
Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided


floridarobert
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 12/26/2006 1:53 PM (GMT -7)   

What your doctor does not tell you.

 

In December 2005 I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The urologist game me a pamphlet which spelled out the choices for treatment.   After reading the pamphlet I started to read via the Internet and found more treatment option than the pamphlet recommended.

 

In the U.S. the treatments are typically 1. watchful waiting; 2. radiation (several kinds) and 3. surgery to remove the prostate.  

 

  1. Watchful waiting capitalizes on the usual slow growing nature of prostate cancer.  If one is over age 70 or 75 one might die of something else before prostate cancer kills.  The operative word is “might” as the available information is statistcaly based. If  a high percentage of people with prostate cancer will experience slow growth of the cancer, that does not rule out the small percentage that might have cancer that is spreading to other parts of the body.  It is not easy to distinguish slow growing from fast growing cancer.  In addition men are living longer these days; waiting is risky.               

 

 

  1. Radiation either by beam or by wire of one source or another tend to kill the cancer but also carry some unwanted side effects: impotence and incontinence (fecal and/or urinary).

 

  1. Radical prostatectomy carries similar side effects as radiation.

 

After reading about the above options I was not happy with any.    I  kept reading and found hormonal treatment, freezing,  and ultrasound. Hormonal treatment and freezing (cryo surgery) which  both carry significant levels of unwanted side effects.  High intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) appeared most promising.

 

HIFU

 

Hifu has been used in Europe and Asia more than a decade to treat benignly enlarged prostate.  More than a half dozen years ago this method has been used for treating prostate cancer. This is the least invasive treatment for prostate cancer that carries the possibility of a cure.  There is no incision and side effects appear to be less than other methods.  Since this is experimental one is engaging in a degree of risk since large numbers of patients over many years have not yet been studied. 

 

From my amateurish reading of literature on the internet, it appeared to me that HIFU offered similar survival rates to someone in my situation (T1C; psa 4.6; Gleason score of 6) with less likelihood of  such side effects as impotence, incontinence, and  fistula.  Perhaps radical prostatectomy has a slightly better cure rate.

 

 

Among HIFU machines, I chose Sonablate over Ablatherm largely because Sonablate gives the physician a live image.

 

I emailed a number of different practitioners and researchers  who use Sonablate in Italy, England, Germany, U.S.A. and Japan. Most responded quickly and were willing to answer my questions.

 

I asked each physician about price and how much experience they had.   The American physicians were the most expensive($20,000 for treatment in Dominican Republic or Mexico), followed by the English, Japanese and finally two  Italians.   Dr. Durso in Torino, Italy was willing to do the procedure for about $7800. With my love for Italy and a good price, I nearly chose him. I then learned there was an “upgrade” to the machine; when I asked him about the upgrade, he did not respond.  I finally chose Dr. Uchida who not only has the most up to date equipment, but he has more experience than any other person working with Sonablate.  For $10,000 I could employ the services of one of the most respected researchers and practitioners in the field.  

 

We arranged for the procedure and I flew to Tokyo on my spring break.  I took my wife and daughter so we could have a little tour of Tokyo, a welcome distraction.  Dr. Uchida met me in the lobby of his hospital, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital.  Hachioji is a suburb of the sprawling city of Tokyo.  I felt as though I was taking the subway to Queens from Manhattan. 

 

Dr. Uchida gave me a room in which my wife and daughter could spend the night.  He spend two hours working on me with the Sonablate from approximately 5- 7 p.m.    I felt very little except the insertion of the catheter through the abdominal wall into by bladder. That felt like someone was trying to jam a screwdriver through my belly.  The next day I was ready to leave the hospital and continue my tour of nearby parks, museums, and temples.  Unfortunately the tube of the catheter prevented me from closing my pants! I was walking around Tokyo with my pants unbuttoned and my shirt tails out covering my front. 

 

The catheter was the most uncomfortable part of this experience, though I never doubted that it was a worthwhile trade off.  I complained to Dr. Uchida who gave me a more flexible tube. It was still irritating but tolerable.  Over the next 3 weeks, increasingly more urine was coming out of my penis than the plastic tube. 

 

I returned to Florida after about 10 days in Tokyo and sought a way to remove the catheter. I had made an appointment with the local urologist who had called for a biopsy.  When I showed up for my appointment to remove the catheter, he refused to see me since I had gone to another doctor.  However annoying that was I called a number of other doctors and found two urologists willing to work with me. 

 

I had my psa tested every 3 months, and it went from 4.6 biopsy, to 5.2 at time of treatment to 1.2  two months after.  Two more tests a few months later yielded 1.3.  I had a biopsy 12 months after the first and 9 months after the HIFU, and all 12 samples were benign.  Such a biopsy does not guarantee that I am cancer free, but I am in pretty good shape to face the future.  Erections have been weaker than prior to the treatment, but I can attain and maintain an erection. There is no ejaculate, but I can climax. Climaxes are slightly weaker than before. I tried the three drugs for erectile dysfunction: Cialis, Levitra, and Viagra each for daily dosage for several weeks.  Levitra worked best for me. I have no other side effects. 

 

I would be happy to talk to anyone interested in HIFU. I am not an expert but I have acquired valuable experience. 


Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 12/28/2006 4:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Everyone!
 
Belated Merry Christmas! We had Christmas a week early and it has been crazy around here with the snowstorm and another coming down on us now.  We had an awful time with guests and the Denver airport and trying to find flights out for them, etc. and made some pretty hairy drives back and forth from the airport, rescuing people from canceled flights etc.  Hope everyone else had a great Christmas!
 
But anyway, on the prostate front, we FINALLY had our meeting with the radiologist/urologist yesterday.  He is double certified, (he had a car accident and couldn't do surgery anymore because of a neck surgery, so got certified in radiology), but he had very good perspectives on both.  After talking to him, we are leaning more and more toward the da vinci.  We have a meeting with the robotic guy on the 3rd and then will make our final decision as to whether open or the da vinci.  
 
And he did do another DRE and still can't feel anything, so I guess that is good news in the meantime.  He also thought from "feel" that the prostate has shrunk quite a bit from the 73 on biopsy  (but warned that feel is not that accurate). 
 
Getting closer to a decision!
 
Tanya and Ken
Signficant Other diagnosed: 10/30/06 (age 63)
PSA: 3.7 (up from 3.4 prior year)
Gleason: 3+3
Biopsy: 1/10 positive, 5% cancerous, right apex.
Treatment:  Undecided

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