Biopsy Proceedure Options

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geobet1
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 54
   Posted 10/31/2006 8:27 AM (GMT -6)   
Just a little note to those of you just coming from your Urologist and are facing a prostate biopsy for the first time. 
 
Lets face it - having a doctor push anything up your butt is just plain unpleasant. The DRE is tough enough for most guys. And, just considering the prospect of having an instrument, that maps the prostate with ultrasound, and has the ability to shoot a needle thru the rectum into the prostate, slid up your butt with only some numbing gel and maybe a shot of novacane, is, for most men, at best unnerving and at worst, enough to make some of us want to jump off the table and run bare-butt buck naked, screaming for the nearest exit.
 
In fact, the DRE by my Urologist was enough to prompt me to suggest that in both our best interests, the biopsy needed to be performed under sedation. Noting that I had actually ripped the vinyl on the exam table, he agreed - (he had really big, fat fingers and knuckles)
 
Some guys take it in stride. Higher thresholds of pain, etc. Me, I can take about anything except dentists drilling my teeth for oil or Urologists exploring and sampling my plumbing.
 
If you're queasy about the process, don't be macho. Ask your Urologist about performing the proceedure under sedation at a surgical outpatient facility. I did, and not only did it quelch the anxiety and fear of having a pitch-fork shoved up my butt, I don't even remember the experience. One minute the anethesiologist said count down from 20 (I got to 18), the next minute I was in recovery asking when they were going to start. No side effects, no recovery problems, just a blissful twightlight sleep. I highly recommend it. I'd take the "sleepy-time" approach over "macho" any day. Plus, according to my Urologist, he  really didn't want to reupholster his exam table again.
 
George 

jetguy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 741
   Posted 10/31/2006 8:55 AM (GMT -6)   
Going night-night may be a good idea. All things considered, I think I'd rather go to an all night dentist than have the biopsy done. : ) (Guess that's my sorry effort at humor. I sure don't feel very funny.)

Regards,

Bill

SJC
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 113
   Posted 10/31/2006 9:33 AM (GMT -6)   

Dear geobet1:

I consider myself an expert of the biopsy, having had the pleasure of undergoing four over the years (12 cores each of the last three times).

I understand your consternation.  While the procedure is basically the same for all of us, no matter where you have it done, the degree of discomfort varies greatly from individual to individual.  I guess it's like the person who is afraid to fly....simply petrified...yet for others it is very easy.  Or those who go to the dentist with no problem, and others who are scared to death.

However, when you look at reality, the biopsy is not a big deal.  I compare it to getting a shot in your prostate as opposed to your arm.  While the probe going into the anus is not a normal phenomenon for most of us (including me), it did not hurt.  The pull of the trigger, or whatever it is when the probe is over the right spot on the prostate, causes discomfort similar to getting stuck in the arm with a needle.  When it was over, I wiped myself (just like after a BM).  I went home for the rest of the day the first time.  However, on biopsies two thru four I returned to work b/c I knew it was no big deal.

I write this post to relieve the anxiety some are facing as they approach a biopsy.  I recognize your discomfort, but for many, as you noted, it is a mild discomfort at best.

 If those who read this post are still petrified of the biopsy, then ask for anesthesia.

 

 

 


geobet1
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 54
   Posted 10/31/2006 9:38 AM (GMT -6)   
Bill:

I hear ya. "nighty-night" is, IMHO, a far better alternative. Besides, having to cope with all the stress and worry that can accumulate prior to the biopsy, a little nap is a well deserved respite. Take advantange of it and savor the opportunity to "sleep" through it. And then its over.

I couldn't tell from your post if you've already had it done. If not, please consider the "nappy-time". There are enough mountains to climb in overcoming this affliction. Enduring unnecessary stress, pain and anxiety shouldn't be one of them. Take every "easy-out" you can. Gives you yet another opportunity to thumb your nose in the face of this cancer. And, above all else, hold onto the fact that one day very soon we'll qualify to wear a tee-shirt that shouts, "We're Cancer Survivors"!

Take care my friend.

George

geobet1
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 54
   Posted 10/31/2006 10:33 AM (GMT -6)   

Hi SJC:

Of course, you're correct. A biopsy, in retrospect, is really no big deal in the broad spectrum of challenges facing us as prostate cancer patients. Clearly, my post wasn't meant to add undue concern or alarm to those facing a biopsy - merely to inform them that choices are available that they may not be aware of, that may more adequately address their personal comfort requirements.

Some guys have obviously have a higher level of tolerance, and subsequently no problems with the traditional approach. Some though, like me, want a menu of alternatives. Or perhaps, as I've discovered recently, some didn't even know they had a choice.

Either way,  we as both patients and consumers, need to exercise our right to full disclosure of alternatives that best address our own unique comfort level requirements within all parameters of diagnosis and treatment of this cancer.

Best Regards;

George

 

 


Cancer is what we HAVE
Cancer Survivors is who we'll be!!


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 10/31/2006 10:34 AM (GMT -6)   
George,
You are no different than hundreds of thousands of males in this country.
Very few females are terrified of needles and even fewer are bothered by brief pain (long term is another story). THIS....is why men can't bear children! Ya just aren't built to handle the pain and that's alright. I've had some very large men faint in my presence and it ain't because I'm that beautiful. I do however have a collection of sharp needles that could scare the macho right outta John Wayne. Fear of what you can't see, fear of the unknown...both pretty unerving.

geobet1
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 54
   Posted 10/31/2006 1:02 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi Swimom:

Wow - did you ever hit the nail on the head. I think you're right, most guys don't have pain tolerances approaching that of a woman. My wife can testify to that.

Needles used to bother me, but I get stuck so much with allergy shots every few weels, and being a diabetic, they hold no particular fear any longer. Nonetheless, hide those hideous sharp needles you have.
 
Now, as for the children reference - you're right on. If men had to have them, I can guarantee that Walmart would have  fewer stores, because there would be a fewer people to shop in them.
 
In fact, if the roles had been reversed in the Garden of Eden, I'm sure Adam would still be waiting for Eve to answer his question of, "You want me to deliver what, out of where???"
 
Warmest Regards;
 
George
 
 
Cancer is what we HAVE
Cancer Survivors is who we'll be!!


family4
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 9
   Posted 10/31/2006 1:39 PM (GMT -6)   
George,

My husband has had two biopsies and we didn't even know they did these anywhere with a numbing gel. WOW! Glad we didn't know of that "option", not that he would have chosen that. He had both of them done as an Outpatient procedure where he was sedated and we were there and done and out eating at a restaurant for lunch when we left. He had no problems or pain at all. He had 15 cores taken each time. This last time is when PCa was detected.

Darla

 

My Husband was Diagnosed 9/22/06

*42 yrs old

*Abnormal DRE with nodule

*3+4=7 Gleason

*2.6 PSA

*3 of 9 cores on right positive, 6 on left negative

*Perineal prostatectomy 10/23/06

*Gleason came back 6 after path and confined to prostate
*Negative Bone and CT scan


jetguy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 741
   Posted 11/2/2006 10:15 AM (GMT -6)   

George, your post did NOT cause me undue concern.  I was well and truly and duly concerned before.  In fact, your observations have helped me.  For one thing, I'm glad to know that I'm not the only weenie who dreads the procedure.  You may be even more of a weenie than I!  I told my wife about you ripping the vinyl on the exam table and she laughed herself sick. 

I also appreciate those who shared their experiences that weren't bad.  Thanks. 

If men had the babies there would be no people.  I wonder why we are such weenies?

Regards,

Bill


geobet1
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 54
   Posted 11/2/2006 12:25 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi Bill:

Glad my experience could help at least someone.

Just my opinion only, but given that the Doc wants to cram an Erector Set up your butt, why would any guy NOT want sleep through it? Best 30 minutes of rest I ever had!

Let us know about your experience. Don't be alarmed by the blood the first time you pee. Mine cleared up by the next day.

Since you and I appear to be tied for King of the Weenies, (at least we admit it) it would be interesting to read your take on the whole thing after its over.

Later My Friend;

George


Cancer is what we HAVE
Cancer Survivors is who we'll be!!


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 11/2/2006 2:21 PM (GMT -6)   
George,

You can stop firghtening the hell out of people any old time now! Not to sound rude...but we need to be promoting less fear, no more, right?

You do understand that few men actually have a difficult time with a biopsy? Anything unknown is hard but as you see...everyone made it through just fine. No one I've ever known has keeled over because they had a biopsy. Your reaction to strange tests and pain is the acception, not the rule. My concern? Somebody might read your posts and be so afraid that he won't seek diagnosis and treatment until it's too late. Fear of man parts being damaged almost cost me my life once. Putting fear to rest so men aren't put to rest permanently should be a major goal for us veterans, right?
Do ya think we could move in a slightly different direction with this? Maybe promote that it wasn't so bad after all? Paul

1mikec
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 11/2/2006 4:04 PM (GMT -6)   
I thought the biopsy was slightly more uncomfortable than the surgery itself
(I had the "da Vinci" "Robotic Laparoscopic Nerve Sparing" surgery procedure).
This was easy and painless.

SJC is correct comparing it to getting a shot in your prostate as opposed to your arm.
The big difference is ONE shot in the arm compared to TEN-TWELVE shots in the prostate!
Dr gave me a pill that put me into a very relaxed state beforehand which really helped.

Mike C

jetguy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 741
   Posted 11/2/2006 5:30 PM (GMT -6)   

Greetings George,

I need to re-state that your post in no way alarmed this guy.  Just as it helps to read posts from guys who had no problems with the biopsy, it helped my state of mind to know that someone else is as unhappy about this as I am.  Weenies of the World Unite!

Other posts discuss incontinence and impotence and it frightens me, but I want the information so I can make a better decision if and when I must. 

Keep Your Mach Up,

Bill


geobet1
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 54
   Posted 11/2/2006 5:32 PM (GMT -6)   
Paul: 
 
I appreciate your critique. I stand appropriately chastised! However, permit me the indulgence of a response; (I do so love a debate)
 
"You can stop firghtening the hell out of people any old time now! Not to sound rude...but we need to be promoting less fear, no more, right?"
 
Such an abrasive commentary can not only be interprepted as rude, but equally insulting. Discounting the patronage, clearly, we are in concert that we need to foster "less fear". Given that, perhaps our methodology might differ, though. 
 
If you'll re-read my earlier post(s) and most recently, Bills' (jetguy) reply, you'll note that my preface and intent was not to cause any undue alarm or concern. In fact, I tried poking some fun at it. Even Bill (jetguy), commented that it helped him, sic, - George, your post did NOT cause me undue concern.  I was well and truly and duly concerned before.  In fact, your observations have helped me..
 
I attempted to lighten the subject by injecting, what I felt was an appropriate measure of symballistic humor. To thumb my nose at the disease, if you will. This disease is serious, no question. And to suggest less, is irresponsible.  But, if we don't develop some layer of humor as a defensive mechanism, it can be depressing.  Clearly, if you, or anyone else felt offended, alarmed or concerned, my apologies indeed.
 
My intent for beginning this post, in the first place, was merely to educate the uninitiated that, we as cancer patients and consumers, do indeed have treatment/testing options. Some, like yourself, might prefer the more traditional approach, others, like me, for perhaps a variety of reasons, might desire an alternative. Please, rest assured, I did not presume a literary license to promote fear and concern.  Far from it. And, I'm personally appalled and insulted that anyone should interpret such a bias and intent.
 
I personally know of four cases, even one from my own urologist, who were not informed of biopsy procedural choices.  They simply were not disclosed to the patient. Patient didn't ask - doctor didn't disclose. So, doctor (not mine) pursued his personal preference. Had these patients  exercised appropriate due dilligence, or otherwise been apprised that they had a choice, one could only assume that they might have exercised an alternative to the traditional approach. Hence, my post.
 
I simply weaved my own limited experience into my post to support that, a viable option does exist.  Even at 6'3", 215lbs, Viet Nam Vet and survivor, I'll be the first to admit that I when it comes to pain, I've had enough to last 2 lifetimes. I want a choice! Choices are critical!  Especially now. And having a working "laymans" knowledge of this disease, combined with exposure to first hand experiences, via this forum, should be fundemental in reinforcing all of our decision making processes. Such an informed foundation allows us to make the choices appropriate for "us".
 
What may be no big deal to you, might indeed be a big deal to me or someone else. In my opinion, to plant in a "newbie's" mind that,  "few men actually have a difficult time with a biopsy" is, at best, inappropriate. Your analysis might be right, but, an equal argument could be supported that it might just foster a stigma of, "hey, if I don't go the traditional route, like all the other guys on here, then, hey, I'm not an average guy". Well, so what if your not???  Who do you have to impress anyway?? I'll tell you who - Absolutely nobody, that's who! We're all different. We all process the unknown, the uncertain, fear and pain differently. We're all individuals. God made us that way for a reason.
 
And, I don't accept that, just because a "newbie" might read where some guy said on a forum that, "few men actually have a difficult time with a biopsy" , that, since its written, it must be true. What a load!  I'm different that you. You're different than me.The newbie is different than both of us.  Distilling the procedure to that level as a proclamation is misleading. Here's an exerpt of my reply to SJC: (Some guys have obviously have a higher level of tolerance, and subsequently no problems with the traditional approach. Some though, like me, want a menu of alternatives. Or perhaps, as I've discovered recently, some didn't even know they had a choice.)

I also acknowledge your concern, as follows:

"My concern? Somebody might read your posts and be so afraid that he won't seek diagnosis and treatment until it's too late."

I don't agree with your concern. I, as well, don't mean to appear rude, but you're making an unfounded assumption. My hope is that everyone beginning this journey realizes that, at each and every juncture, they do have decisions, choices and selections to make. And clearly, I trust that my posts did not cloud any of those processes for anyone.
 
None of us should not be so intimidated by the process, the disease or by our doctors, that we don't realize there can be alternative approaches. I would not presume to sugguest to anyone, that the approach I exercised for my biopsy is the appropriate one for everyone - again, though, I personally feel that "everyone" should have a choice. 
 
As for concerns, I could support an equally defensible argument that a newly diagnosed patient, finding this site for the first time, might be so intimidated by your critical review of my post and your subsequent assumptions, that it precludes the guy from submitting a post at all. But, I'll let it be.
 
"Putting fear to rest so men aren't put to rest permanently should be a major goal for us veterans, right?"
 
Well, I do agree with you on this point! However, I'm not as far along as you. Putting fear to rest, can be a significant challenge. We each deal with it in our own unique and personalized way. I personally choose to identify the fear, break it down into digestible elements and segments then prioritize it, assume ownership of it,  then - find someway to poke some humor at it! Its not as scary that way.  It never goes away, it just makes it easier to live with it.
 
"Do ya think we could move in a slightly different direction with this? Maybe promote that it wasn't so bad after all? Paul"
 
As for "moving in a slightly different direction", why don't we just drop the who thing? Again, if you'll note my post, I never implied that it was bad - afterall, I don't even remember it!! That's my point.
 
Again,  if my post or replies offended, alarmed or concerned, anyone, you indeed have my apologies. Clearly, it was not my intent.
 
Regards;
 
George

 



Cancer is what we HAVE
Cancer Survivors is who we'll be!!


SJC
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 113
   Posted 11/2/2006 8:52 PM (GMT -6)   

Dear George:

I applaud your sincerety; I accept your apology.  Since you were the originating author of this thread, I give you credit for stimulating dialogue which I think everyone will say has unequivocally established that a biopsy creates fear and anxiety for some and just another day at the urologist's office for others.  We all now know, thanks to you, there are choices out there.  I also think this horse is dead; so, let's stop beating him.  Please start another thread.  Thanks.


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 11/2/2006 8:59 PM (GMT -6)   
Good plan SJC. Sheesh, you boys. What are we going to do with you?
I see there has been a little exchange of the minds today. SJ is right, time to move this forward before we have to vote.....LOL!
Swim

mickeyboy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 56
   Posted 11/4/2006 5:46 AM (GMT -6)   
Trust me lads, im an old hand at these biopses ( 3 in the last 18 months ) unfortunately last 1 was not a good 1 diagnosed Gleason 3+3, but besides that remember that this procedure will let them know if youve got a problem, and if you have the quicker they find it the sooner they can sort it.
Admittedly its not the best thing to look forward to, i found it uncomfortable but bearable, it did not hurt. Lets face it us fellas are not used to having foreign objects stuck up our arse ( well im not anyway ) you can go straight back to work after. only probs i had was that when i ejaculated for about 4-5 days it was mostly blood, but then back to normal. Hope this helps anyone out there due to have 1, take it in yiour stride and good luck.

PLDBrandon
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 11/4/2006 2:42 PM (GMT -6)   
Some of these treatments do sound awkard and painfull sad however they do seem on the cunning edge and I guess when your in such a situation all things are made possible

Aussiebob
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 1/4/2009 2:28 AM (GMT -6)   

My prostate biopsy was the most excrutiating pain I have ever experienced! smhair   I trusted my urologist and thought he would use local anaesthetic or iv sedation.  He was running late for the operating theatre and rushed my procedure.  It felt like there was no lubricant on the probe, the sound of the gun was very loud (I wear hearing aides), and the biopsies became increasingly painful until I had a major body spasm, screamed ****!, and nearly fell off the table.  He then decided to stop. I really do think he was being sadistic.  He laughed it off in the follow up consultation some weeks later. As it turned out I had prostatitis, and no cancer.

Aussiebob


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25364
   Posted 1/4/2009 8:56 AM (GMT -6)   
My take, like everything else here, everyone is a different case. I had 3 biopsies. The first one, no sedation down there or anywhere, was more scared than hurt, real sensitive to strange noises, so the snap of each needle made me flinch, didn't particularly hurt. Eleven months later, another one, this time, same dr. said let'sedate you down there, so they started putting in needles to relieve the upcoming pain, the needles made me jump out of my skin. Once the med took, they took the samples, didn't feel a thing, but still didn't like the noise. Had biopsy 3 exactly 6 weeks later, this time, told the dr., no sedation, and he said, often men say that, because the pain to get sedated is worse then the minor pain of the sampling. So on the 3rd one, and based on the other 2 experiences, I lay quietly and let him do his thing. As far as having a large penis shaped objected well lubed and shoved up your a**, I don't know of any heterosexual man that would find that inviting or amusing. In my own fight with PC, for me, the biopsies, though unpleasant, were the least of my worries, and ultimately proved beyond a doubt that I had PC.

David in SC
Age 56, 56 at DX
 
PSA 7/7 5.8, 7/8 12.3, 9/8 14.9, 10/8 16.4
 
3rd Biopsy 9-2008 Positive 7 of 7 cores positive, ranging from 40 - 90%, G 4+3 & 3+4
 
Open RP surgery  November 14, 2008 at St. Francis Hospital, Greenville, SC, Dr. Ronald Smith - Surgeon, Non-nerve sparing, 4 days in hospital, staples removed 11/24/8, Catheter out on 12/15/8 on day 32.  Day 33, urine stopped flowing, new catheter put in 12/16/08, Catheter out 12/29/08.  After 7 hours, complete stoppage again, emergency room put in Catheter #3 early evening of day 45, still 12/29/08. New appt. to see dr. on 1/5/9 as result.
 
Post-surgery Pathlogy Report:
Gleason 3+4=7, pT2c pN0 pMx, Prostate 42 grams, tumor 20% cancer
Contained in capsular, neg. margins apex, bladder neck, right lobe, neg. in seminal vessels and lymph nodes.
 
First PSA Post Surgery  Scheduled now for 2/9/9
 
 


Gunner59
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 109
   Posted 1/4/2009 9:28 AM (GMT -6)   
I had 2 biopsy's, the first with no anesthetic and 12 samples taken. I found the procedure very uncomfortable, but not unbearable. The second time, my urologist wanted to take 24 samples, and recommended twilight sedation, and I wholeheartedly agreed. I was off to lala land in no time and woke up in recovery with a nice prewarmed blanket wrapped around me, a vast improvement over the first time.

If I had to do it all over again, I'll take the sedation every time.
Age 48 at diagnosis
3 Jul 08 PSA 27.21
Biopsy positive 3+3=7 9 of 24 punches
Bone scan clear
22 Sep 08 Laproscopic Radical Prostatectomy and bilateral pelvic Lymphadenectomy
Gleason 3+4 after prostate removal, lymph nodes clear
Stage T2B
PSA at 3 months=undetectable


DJBearGuy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 714
   Posted 1/4/2009 11:44 AM (GMT -6)   
I'm glad Aussiebob revived this topic, and I wish I'd read about it before my biopsy.

A number of folks compared it to a shot (or a few shots) in the arm. I happened to have had dental work a week or so the biopsy, and I found the experience to be very similar. In fact, I describe it to my friends as "having dental work done on your ass". In both cases the doc started out with several anesthetic injections, which are not very pleasant. Then they proceed, and, in my case, the dentist decided from my reactions that he must have missed a nerve, so he gave me yet another injection, which did help. In the biopsy case, the doc probably also missed a nerve, and I was gripping a towel so hard I thought I might rip it. But no additional injections, just try to finish quick. And it is true that it didn't take as long as the dental work I had.

As far as the probe goes, just having it inserted was odd but not so bad. But then he pushed it hard to get it into a particular location, and that was quite painful.

The doc recommended that if I have this again, sedation is recommended. My take is, if the idea of having dental work done on your rear end doesn't bother you, then go for it. If it does bother you, remember you can ask for sedation--my doc didn't mention it until we had already gotten started.
DJ

Age 53
PSA 2007 about 2
PSA 2008 4.3
Diagnosed September 2008.
Biopsy: 6 of 12 cores positive
Gleason 4+3 = 7
CT and Bone scan negative
Da Vinci surgery at City of Hope December 8, 2008
Radical prostatectomy and lymph node dissection
Catheter removed on 7th day, replaced on 8th day, removed again 14th day following negative cystogram
pT2c
lymph nodes negative
microscopic margins
next PSA 1/22/08


sandstorm
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 194
   Posted 1/4/2009 12:03 PM (GMT -6)   
Well in my case I just did not want to go through this proceedure and resisted untill the anitbiotics could no longer hold the PSA's down. Once I realized that I may need to save my own life, I consented to the biopsy. I found the proceedure to be barbaric and humiliating, I felt I was in a torture chamber the entire time. However at the end of the proceedure I had to rate the actual physical pain on a scale of from 1(lowest) to 10(highest), at a 4. Anyway I have the consolation of knowing that in 5 more days I will never ever have to go through that biopsy again.
Age at DX 57
5-18-07 PSA 7.7
5-06-08 PSA 4.6  8% free psa
10-23-08 PSA 5.65 4% free psa
11-04-08 biopsy
11-11-08 2 of 12 cores positive
Gleason 3+3  6  stage t1c
CT and Bone scan negative
Scheduled for da vinci RRP 01-09-09


lifeguyd
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 672
   Posted 1/4/2009 12:13 PM (GMT -6)   

I have commented here several times over the past two years on this very topic.  I am always surprised when it becomes a battle of "macho" vs "wimpy". 

The diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer is a series of indignities and pain cry    It is what it is.  However, I contend that the medical establishment should do all it can to make the trip smoother and less painful. nono

One of those things would be to ALWAYS have lightly sedated biopsies. yeah


PSA up to 4.7 July 2006 , nodule noted during DRE
Biopsy 10/16/06
stage T2A  -  Psa 4.7
Gleason agressive 4+4=8  right side
DaVinci Surgery  January 2007
Post op confirms gleason 4+4=8
No extension or invasion identified
Few continence problems
PSA 90 day (-.01)  , (6 month -.01) , (9 month +.02) , (1 year +.02) ( 18 months +.02) (two years+.02)
Using bimix for ED
born in 1941

Post Edited (lifeguyd) : 1/4/2009 11:20:29 AM (GMT-7)


Ziggy9
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 981
   Posted 1/4/2009 12:32 PM (GMT -6)   
lifeguyd said...
I have commented here several times over the past two years on this very topic. I am always surprised when it becomes a battle of "macho" vs "wimpy".

The diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer is a series of indignities and pain [img]/community/emoticons/cry.gif[/img] It is what it is. However, I contend that the medical establishment should do all it can to make the trip smoother and less painful. [img]/community/emoticons/nono.gif[/img]

One of those things would be to ALWAYS have lightly sedated biopsies. [img]/community/emoticons/yeah.gif[/img]


I wouldn't want a slightly sedated biopsy. That would be like a colonoscopy where even if slightly sedated you'll need someone to drive you and stay during it. Not everyone has a non working wife to do that. You may not like the wimpy reference but c'mon a 12 core with lidocaine is not that bad. That's one of the less painful things the average PCa patient will be going through soon after. Now when I had my 3d mapping saturation biopsy with 45 cores that was and should be mandatory sedation.

As far as women being more tolerant to pain, not all the time. My older sister is terrified of needles to this day. If she can take a medication in pill form no matter how less effective she'll opt for that. Meanwhile with my being a vet and enduring many innoculations early on it's no big deal to me. But get this, the same woman terrified of shots gave birth four times. Showing that much of this fear of a needles is more psychological and driven by childhood fears.
Diagnosed 11/08/07
Age: 58
3 of 12 @5%
Psa: 2.3
3+3=6
Size: 34g
T-2-A
 
2/22/08
3D Mapping Saturation Biopsy
1 of 45 @2%
Psa:2.1
3+3=6
28g after taking Avodart
Catheter for 1 day
Good Candidate for TFT
(Targeted Focal Therapy)
Cryosurgery(Ice Balls)
Clinical Research Study
 
4/22/08
TFT performed at University of Colorado
Medical Center at Denver Fitzsimons Campus
Catheter for 4 days
Slight soreness for 2 weeks but afterward
life returns as normal
 
7/30/08
Psa: .32
 
11/10/08
Psa.62
Not unexpected bounce after
the 80% drop the quarter earlier.
Along with urine flow readings, and
acceptable amount left in bladder measured
by sonic. Results  warrant skipping third
quarter tests, and to return 
April, 2009 for
final biopsy scheduled to
complete clinical research study 
 
 
 

Post Edited (realziggy) : 1/4/2009 12:28:07 PM (GMT-7)

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