Needing help and advice

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parson
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 12/23/2006 9:11 AM (GMT -7)   
Just learned have prostate cancer , 12/21/06,age 64, PSA 3.5, gleason 3+3=6, 3 out of 12 positive samples, Been on the internet since and geting info. Urologists recommends surgery. I am in NE and available to "big" hospitals. Personalty would favor surgery, done, gone and know what else may be going on. Seeking pros and cons of pertinel , lapro, retro ?
Barrister

shepla
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 102
   Posted 12/23/2006 10:03 AM (GMT -7)   
PARSON,   First of all Where are you from What big cities are you near.  I just had Sugery and I highly recommend it. I went to NYC Sloan Kettering Dr. Eastham he has done over2,000 Radical Prosectomies. I would want someone who did at least 500. Your PSA  and Gleason are not real high so start doing your research you do have some time.        SHEPLA

Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 12/23/2006 10:12 AM (GMT -7)   
Barrister,

Your tests saying its and early, slow cancer. All treatments bring risks but I see you have chosen surgery. For the sake of ease, I will start you out in here by simply saying, LRP and RRLP are by far the easiest to recover from physically.
A couple of weeks compared to months. Robotic laps are quickly movin in as the procedure of choice becasue it is less invasive. Still, it is not for everyone.

There is a slightly increased risk of positive margins and nerve damage with the peri. Not mention that sounds really uncomfortable :>0 Just my opinion.

Traditional surgery takes longer than lapro's to heal from but, in the hands of a great surgery I would suggest it every time over a less experienced Playstation player. And we thought buying kids video games was a waste, eh? A lot of those early game players are now making millions doing robotic surgery!

Where you live there are plenty of Surgeons that findong a good one won't be a problem. Good Luck and just hang in there & take your time.

Swim

shepla
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 102
   Posted 12/23/2006 10:17 AM (GMT -7)   
Parson, I forgot to mention I had a open Radical Prosectomy MY PSA was 3.3 ,Gleason 6 containe to Prostate. I chose the Nerve Sparing Procedure which saved both Nerves. 2 months after Surgery I am Undetectable 2 to 3 pads a day and Erections with Viagra . SHEPLA

biker90
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1463
   Posted 12/23/2006 10:24 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Parson,
 
Sorry you have to be here but this is a great forum.
 
I chose RRP because my surgeon had done about 800 of them and I wanted him to be up close and personal with my insides.  He then could apply all his skill directly to my problem without going through technology to get there.  But that is just me.  I am 2 weeks past surgery and feel great.  The pain was minimal throughout and I have to watch what I do just because I feel so well.
 
Good luck and be assured that the option you choose will be the right one for you.
 
Jim
Age 72. Diagnosed on 11/03/06. PSA 7.05. Gleason 3+3 on both sides.
Clinical stage: T2B.
RRP on 12/7/06. Nerves intact and lymph nodes clean. Catheter and staples out on 12/13/06.
Pathological stage: T2B. Gleason 3+4. Cancer confined to prostate.
First PSA will be on 1/3/2007
 
            "I have cancer but cancer does NOT have me."


spinbiscuit
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 818
   Posted 12/23/2006 10:56 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello Parson,

Welcome to the group, but I'm sorry you have to be here. As you said surgery will allow you to get this whole thing done with, and the results are excellent for men with your diagnosis. Fortunately you live out here in the east so you will be able to pick any procedure, and surgeon you wish. Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, Washington DC, all have renouned surgeons that offer state of the art techiques. So pick the procedure carefully, and search for the doctor with the most experience, and reputation.

Good luck with your search, and keep posting questions. We will be here to help, and support you all we can.

Glen
Diagnosed at age 60
PSA went from 2.2 to 3.8 in 14 months
2 of 14 cores positive at 10%
Gleason 6(3+3), negative DRE, neg. boundaries
DaVinci surgery on 02/23/06
 


jetguy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 741
   Posted 12/23/2006 4:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi parson, as you can see, most everyone here chooses surgery. I have chosen radiation which I will begin in January. It seem to me that most of the guys who have surgery just want the thing out of their bodies. I don't care about that, I just don't want to have cancer. I also don't want anybody cutting on my tender body.

Regards,

Bill
Gleason 3+3=6, T1c, one core in twelve, another pre-cancerous.
62 years old and good health.  Married 37 years.  To same woman!


Tamu
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 626
   Posted 12/23/2006 4:59 PM (GMT -7)   

Parson,

Welcome to the place that you did not want to come.  You will quickly find out there are just a whole bunch of great people hear and they all have traveled the journey that you have now embarked on.  We willl share our experiences and provide as much information as possible but you will make the call as it should be.  That also means to not let a doctor make the call for you.  Take control now and you will be the better for it.

Now, my story.  My PCa was staged much like yours.  If you have not looked up the Partin Tables yet you might want to do that.  It provides a statistical projection for the cancer to be contained to the prostate and/or surrounding tissue.  It uses your PSA and Gleason score to provide the projection.  I have not looked yours up but I believe that with your PSA and Gleason that you are about 85% of the cancer being confined to the prostate.  When I was told about my PCa I decided that I wanted to have the robotic laprascopic radical prostatectomy because I believed that it would give me the best results for incontinence and impotence.  I also wanted an "old" pro doing the surgery.  I was willing to travel anywhere to achieve that outcome and was lucky enough to find my surgeon only two hours away and he had done over 800 of these procedures.  I came out of the surgery pain free and ready to walk as soon as I woke up.  On the third day after surgery I walked a mile and just kept on going from there.  There are a lot of experienced surgeons around the country so I am sure that you can find a good one close to you.  If you are considering the robotic you can go to www.davinciprostatectomy.com and find a list of doctors and hospitals that do this procedure.  Also, another good source of knowledge is at www.yananow.net.  When you go here and click in go to Mentor Experiences and scroll down.  You will find the stories of many men listed by type of treatment.  This will give you a feel for the variableness is results.

While I was hoping to have the luck of the variableness for incontinence and impotence it did not turn out that way.  I would consider my experience probably more toward the norrm.  I am almost two months post op and I have primarily stress incontinence using one to two very light poise pads a day.  I can not get an erection and just received a vacuum device to help with that.  I am on a penile rehabilitation program.  When you talk talking to urologist make sure you asked about penile rehabilitation and support for incontinence.  This seems to be an area where there is less of a standard practice.

The good of all of this is that you have cancer at a stage that it is totally curable. 

Good luck and let us know the steps you take of your journey.

Tamu


Diagnosed 7/6/06
1 of 10 core samples, 40%
Stage T1c, Gleason 3+3
Da Vinci on 11/01/06
56 Years Old
Post Op Path
Gleason 3+3
Approx. 5% of prostate involved
Prostate Confined, margins clear
Undetectable PSA on 12/18/06


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 12/23/2006 6:19 PM (GMT -7)   

2-23

Hi! Barrister ~

 

                                  Sending a special “Warm Welcome” to you

 

You have joined a group of wonderful individuals who are so willing to share their journey with you… which in turn ~ will make your journey much smoother.  You will be getting lots of input from all of us with your questions….  Keep sharing with us as you make your decisions because you will then have a journey for others to follow…. Behind you! 

Each decision is unique to the individual….. 

Always Remember…

YOU MAKE THE DECISIONS… YOU HAVE OPTIONS…

~ and ~

Your decision will be the right decision for you!!!

 

You will eventually hit the OVERLOAD phase and this is normal.

At this point ~ just stop…. Take a deep breath… ~ and continue on…. Once you’ve made the decision as to the treatment you want…. things smooth out!  But ~ you have to step on this stone to get there…..  I call it the BIG stepping-stone in your journey with prostate cancer.  It is one of many along this path and our goal is to reach the stone of being free of prostate cancer.  And we are here to help you on ~ to each and every stone.  Our helping hands will always be there for you!

 

Buddy and I invite you to read “Our Journey”… a direct link is below...

We chose Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy

 

Excerpt from “Our Journey”…

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER... and POWER conquers FEAR!!!!!

We decided to share “Our Journey” in hopes of helping at least 1 person! 

If it helps more….  If it helps you!!!!      That will truly be a blessing 

At no time are we writing to tell you what you must do, or what you should do….

                               Your decision is Your Decision!!

Just giving you a view of what decisions we made, what the process was for us, and the outcome as of this date. 

 

 

Our thoughts and prayers will be with you as you continue your search for answers…

 

In New Friendship ~ Lee & Buddy

 

             "GOD Bless You"

 

It's a little prayer "GOD Bless You"...

but it means so much each day,

It means may angels guard you

and guide you on your way.

                                                                                                         ~author unknown~

 

 

Sharing ~ Our Personal Threads

If you or your loved ones ~  pull “1” thing from our journey ~ that helps you on your journey

~ it will truly make our hearts happy!!! ~

 

Links to our Personal Journey Threads:

Click on titles below and it will take you directly to them.

Once there… remember to click on the REFRESH button. (This is important)

 

Our Journey ~ Sharing is Caring

A Special Note for Loved Ones (Wives, Partners, and Caregivers)

Murphy ~ Our Special Helper

Give Yourself a Second Opinion... Read this book...

The hardest thing for me....

Helpful Hints for New Members... Hope this helps you! :)


mama bluebird - Lee & Buddy… from North Carolina

Link to our personal journey…>>>     Our Journey ~ Sharing is Caring 

April 3, 2006  53 on surgery day

RRP / Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy with "wide excision"

PSA 4.6   Gleason  3+3=6    T2a   Confined to Prostate

June 29th ~ PSA Less than 0.1 Non-detectable

Post Edited (bluebird) : 1/6/2007 6:48:25 PM (GMT-7)


kw
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 883
   Posted 12/23/2006 7:52 PM (GMT -7)   
    I chose RRP surgey for my teratment.  Could have wished for a little better bladder control.  but at my 1 month post cathater the
dR. Said I was doing average and should continue to improve with the Kegals and walking.
    Just study all your options.
 
     Good Luck.    KW
    43
    PSA 5.7 - Discovered during Annual Physical with Family Practice Dr.
    Gleason 7
    Biopsy - 3 of 12 positive (up to 75%) all on left side of prostate
    RRP on Oct, 17 - Nerves on right side saved.
    All Lab's clear.  No Cancer outside prostate
    Cathiter in for 3 weeks due to complications in healing. Removed Nov, 9
    Next Dr. Appt and first Post op PSA on Dec, 11
   


parson
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 12/23/2006 8:10 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for all the replys. It really makes me feel I am connected to some info. As most of you probable did I have been on the internet for the past two days and speaking to everyone. I am in New Jersey and of course wouldn travel for treatment. Tamu you mentioned you just had the Robotic. I have reading about two Dr. Tewari in NY and Su at John Hopkins. Anyone have any experience with either. Do these methods also remove surrounding tissue for biopsy? Barrister

parson
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 12/23/2006 8:28 PM (GMT -7)   
Spinbiscuit Where did you have your DeVinci done and by whom? Barrister

spinbiscuit
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 818
   Posted 12/23/2006 11:44 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Barrister,

I'm here in the Washington DC suburbs (Maryland side of the river). After much research we chose Dr. Jason Engel to perform the DaVinci procedure at George Washington University Hospital. I highly recommend Dr. Engel, and GWU Hospital. I Believe one or two others on this site have also had the DaVinci procedure performed by Dr. Engel. His group is the Urologic Surgeons of Washinton, and his phone number is 202-223-1024 if you would like to contact him.

I have also heard Dr. Tewari's name mentioned frequently on this sight, and he is located very near you, so you might give him a call too. The important thing is that you feel confident and comfortable with your surgeon.

If you have any other questions just ask, and we'll be here to help as much as we can.

Glen
Diagnosed at age 60
PSA went from 2.2 to 3.8 in 14 months
2 of 14 cores positive at 10%
Gleason 6(3+3), negative DRE, neg. boundaries
DaVinci surgery on 02/23/06
 


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 12/24/2006 12:28 AM (GMT -7)   
Barrister,

If you have access to Tewari, by all means, give him some thought. Tewari worked with Menon here in Detroit where the robotic prostatectomy was pioneered. As you know he's now at NY Pres.

swim

Tamu
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 626
   Posted 12/24/2006 6:34 AM (GMT -7)   
Barrister,

If I had not found my surgeon as close as I did Dr. Tewari was one of the ones that I was going to pursue. As mentioned he fellowshipped under Dr. Menon in Detroit who is recognozed as probably having done the most robotics as anyone in the country. Being in New Jersey it would be well worth the trip.

Tamu
Diagnosed 7/6/06
1 of 10 core samples, 40%
Stage T1c, Gleason 3+3
Da Vinci on 11/01/06
56 Years Old
Post Op Path
Gleason 3+3
Approx. 5% of prostate involved
Prostate Confined, margins clear
Undetectable PSA on 12/18/06


parson
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 12/24/2006 6:58 AM (GMT -7)   
Glen, Tamu, swim thank you for your replys. I will be pursuing  . I think Tawari is now at John Hopkins in Baltimore. If you don't hear from me I will not be lost but I am leaving on  vacation ( Aruba ) this evening and I am not sure of the availablity of e-mail. So don't give up on me. ( Although some of my kids know I haven't told my wife yet as she is already in Aruba ) If I do not speak with you have a good holiday and I will be back on line January 6th. Barrister

Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 12/24/2006 9:59 AM (GMT -7)   
Aruba,

Humph, could ya send a little sunshine up here for the week?
Have a safe and relaxing trip.

Swim

floridarobert
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 12/26/2006 1:35 PM (GMT -7)   

What your doctor does not tell you.

 

In December 2005 I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The urologist game me a pamphlet which spelled out the choices for treatment.   After reading the pamphlet I started to read via the Internet and found more treatment option than the pamphlet recommended.

 

In the U.S. the treatments are typically 1. watchful waiting; 2. radiation (several kinds) and 3. surgery to remove the prostate.  

 

  1. Watchful waiting capitalizes on the usual slow growing nature of prostate cancer.  If one is over age 70 or 75 one might die of something else before prostate cancer kills.  The operative word is “might” as the available information is statistcaly based. If  a high percentage of people with prostate cancer will experience slow growth of the cancer, that does not rule out the small percentage that might have cancer that is spreading to other parts of the body.  It is not easy to distinguish slow growing from fast growing cancer.  In addition men are living longer these days; waiting is risky.               

 

 

  1. Radiation either by beam or by wire of one source or another tend to kill the cancer but also carry some unwanted side effects: impotence and incontinence (fecal and/or urinary).

 

  1. Radical prostatectomy carries similar side effects as radiation.

 

After reading about the above options I was not happy with any.    I  kept reading and found hormonal treatment, freezing,  and ultrasound. Hormonal treatment and freezing (cryo surgery) which  both carry significant levels of unwanted side effects.  High intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) appeared most promising.

 

HIFU

 

Hifu has been used in Europe and Asia more than a decade to treat benignly enlarged prostate.  More than a half dozen years ago this method has been used for treating prostate cancer. This is the least invasive treatment for prostate cancer that carries the possibility of a cure.  There is no incision and side effects appear to be less than other methods.  Since this is experimental one is engaging in a degree of risk since large numbers of patients over many years have not yet been studied. 

 

From my amateurish reading of literature on the internet, it appeared to me that HIFU offered similar survival rates to someone in my situation (T1C; psa 4.6; Gleason score of 6) with less likelihood of  such side effects as impotence, incontinence, and  fistula.  Perhaps radical prostatectomy has a slightly better cure rate.

 

 

Among HIFU machines, I chose Sonablate over Ablatherm largely because Sonablate gives the physician a live image.

 

I emailed a number of different practitioners and researchers  who use Sonablate in Italy, England, Germany, U.S.A. and Japan. Most responded quickly and were willing to answer my questions.

 

I asked each physician about price and how much experience they had.   The American physicians were the most expensive($20,000 for treatment in Dominican Republic or Mexico), followed by the English, Japanese and finally two  Italians.   Dr. Durso in Torino, Italy was willing to do the procedure for about $7800. With my love for Italy and a good price, I nearly chose him. I then learned there was an “upgrade” to the machine; when I asked him about the upgrade, he did not respond.  I finally chose Dr. Uchida who not only has the most up to date equipment, but he has more experience than any other person working with Sonablate.  For $10,000 I could employ the services of one of the most respected researchers and practitioners in the field.  

 

We arranged for the procedure and I flew to Tokyo on my spring break.  I took my wife and daughter so we could have a little tour of Tokyo, a welcome distraction.  Dr. Uchida met me in the lobby of his hospital, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital.  Hachioji is a suburb of the sprawling city of Tokyo.  I felt as though I was taking the subway to Queens from Manhattan. 

 

Dr. Uchida gave me a room in which my wife and daughter could spend the night.  He spend two hours working on me with the Sonablate from approximately 5- 7 p.m.    I felt very little except the insertion of the catheter through the abdominal wall into by bladder. That felt like someone was trying to jam a screwdriver through my belly.  The next day I was ready to leave the hospital and continue my tour of nearby parks, museums, and temples.  Unfortunately the tube of the catheter prevented me from closing my pants! I was walking around Tokyo with my pants unbuttoned and my shirt tails out covering my front. 

 

The catheter was the most uncomfortable part of this experience, though I never doubted that it was a worthwhile trade off.  I complained to Dr. Uchida who gave me a more flexible tube. It was still irritating but tolerable.  Over the next 3 weeks, increasingly more urine was coming out of my penis than the plastic tube. 

 

I returned to Florida after about 10 days in Tokyo and sought a way to remove the catheter. I had made an appointment with the local urologist who had called for a biopsy.  When I showed up for my appointment to remove the catheter, he refused to see me since I had gone to another doctor.  However annoying that was I called a number of other doctors and found two urologists willing to work with me. 

 

I had my psa tested every 3 months, and it went from 4.6 biopsy, to 5.2 at time of treatment to 1.2  two months after.  Two more tests a few months later yielded 1.3.  I had a biopsy 12 months after the first and 9 months after the HIFU, and all 12 samples were benign.  Such a biopsy does not guarantee that I am cancer free, but I am in pretty good shape to face the future.  Erections have been weaker than prior to the treatment, but I can attain and maintain an erection. There is no ejaculate, but I can climax. Climaxes are slightly weaker than before. I tried the three drugs for erectile dysfunction: Cialis, Levitra, and Viagra each for daily dosage for several weeks.  Levitra worked best for me. I have no other side effects. 

 

I would be happy to talk to anyone interested in HIFU. I am not an expert but I have acquired valuable experience. 


JayMan56
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 61
   Posted 12/26/2006 2:49 PM (GMT -7)   

Parson,

Welcome!!!

Thanks to the internet, there are wonderful sources of information, this forum included. I hit up WebMD, The Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, Johns Hopkins among others.

One thing I learned is that we are all as different and our cases are no different. I was originally going to go the route of seed + radiation therapy. However, the more I spoke to people, the more I learned that surgery to remove the prostate was best for a guy my age (56). The general rule of thumb is the younger you are, the longer your life expectancy, a radical prostatectomy is the answer. In my case, I chose the DaVinci robotic machine. However, at 64, you seem to be a prime candidate for radiation or seed therapy. One thing to keep in mind while speaking to surgeons is that if you go to a surgeon, he/she will tell you that surgery is the best. If you talk to a radiation specialist, radiation will always be the best. In short, if the only tool available to the doc you're talking to is a hammer, he/she will be looking for nails.

Do your research, talk to other doctors, talk to friends and you will come up with the best treatment option of you. Only you yourself can make the final call on this and be able to live with it.

Jay


  • 56 year old male, divorced
  • Diagnosed: 10/12/06
  • Two of twelve samples contained malignent cells, Gleasons: 3+3=6, 3+4=7
  • Last PSA as of 11/5/06: 2.3
  • In control, but partially terrified about the future
  • Click (or paste) this link to watch the DaVinci Procedure: http://www.or-live.com/ShawneeMission/1664/event/webcast.cfm?
  • Davinci surgery took place on 12/12/06
  • Post-op report shows zero malignancies in surrounding tissue, zero malignancies in lymph nodes and the prostate had one malignancy at 3+3=6.
  • Regained continence 3 days post-surgery.
  • Regained a full erection 8 days post-surgery!! Yippee!!!


JJK
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 12/26/2006 6:14 PM (GMT -7)   
I also went to Memorial Sloan Kettering, Dr. Bertrand Guillonneau.  I have nothing to say other then thank goodness I went there.  I was very happy.
 
JJK

ed from pa
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 42
   Posted 12/28/2006 7:05 AM (GMT -7)   
Hey Parson, you are in great hands on this forum. This doctor is suppose to be the best on the East Coast.

your friend ed from pa

Post Edited By Moderator (Admin) : 8/23/2010 4:20:13 PM (GMT-6)


parson
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 1/6/2007 6:19 PM (GMT -7)   
JayMan56: Wait until you get to 64, IT ISN'T THAT OLD. I have several appointments , one at Hopkins. I am leaning toward surgery, but debating on open v robatic. Will keep in touch.Barrister
Age 64, PSA 3.4, 3 of 12 cores positive 12/14/06,gleason 3+3=6


BenEcho10
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 133
   Posted 1/6/2007 8:50 PM (GMT -7)   
Parson, I am sorry to hear of your diagnosis.

I am 49. Pre-suregery PSA was 4.6. Gleason 10. I had radical retropubic (open) surgery in November 2006 at Johns Hopkins.

As you have probably already learned with your low PSA and mid-range Gleason, you sound like an excellent candidate for a complete cure with surgery. That is the big advantage of surgery. If the cancer was organ confined, you have any excellent chance of 100% cure.

Here are just some quick comments on the surgery techniques from my own research of about 90 days ago.

PERITENIAL: Less bleeding however they cannot remove and test lymph nodes to confirm that cancer had not spread. I ruled it out immediately for that reason. I think that this surgery is an option to be considered if you are seriously overweight since that makes surgery through the abdomen more difficult. I don't think that this technique is used too often anymore.

LAPROSCOPIC or ROBOTIC: This is the least invasive procedure so it has the quickest recovery time. Robotic is a newer technique and some doctors are just mastering this. If you choose Robotic, make sure that your doctor has done lots of this technique. Quantity of operations done by the surgeon equates to how good an outcome that you get. I passed over this one because I was afraid that is might be "too new" and not have all the kinks worked out. However, I have noticed that message postings on this forum are very positive on robotic so I may have been mistaken.

RADICAL RETROPUBIC (open surgery): This is a tougher surgery on the patient but the Dr. can get a "better look" due to more open operating field. This surgery is no longer as bad as it used to be. Blood loss is generally minimal. This is the one that I went with for two reasons. With my high Gleason (10) I wanted the surgeon to get a good look at the tissue sourounding the prostate. Also, this is the technique that my surgeon and hospital was most skilled in.

Obviously you should discuss the pros and cons of each method with your doctor.

Good luck,

Ben

parson
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 1/7/2007 6:06 AM (GMT -7)   
Ben: Thanks for the headsup. I am seeing Dr. Su at Hopkins. May OI ask who did your surgery? MJB
Age 64, PSA 3.4, 3 of 12 cores positive 12/14/06,gleason 3+3=6


BenEcho10
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 133
   Posted 1/9/2007 8:24 PM (GMT -7)   
Parson, I am sorry that I didn't get back to you sooner. I missed your posting until today.

Dr. Partin did my surgery (the same guy who created the Partin tables - small world.) Dr. Partin was weak on bedside manner and information but I saw him for surgical skill not bedside manner. I think that you will be very happy overall with your experience at JH. They took good care care of me. They have an entire recovery wards devoted just to prostate cancer surgery recovery. The nurses all specialize in this and were wonderful.

If you are traveling from out of town, I highly recommend the Residence Inn near the Baltimore Harbor Waterfront about 1.5 miles from the hospital. We got a two bedroom, two bathroom, full kitchen unit for something just under $300 a night and stayed there for two days before surgery and six days after since I had to fly home half way across the country and wanted to wait before attempting that. Dr. Partin said it was OK to fly as soon as I was discharged but that would have been very exhausting and possibly even painful. I am glad that we waited six days.

Good luck on whatever you decide. Let me know if I can provide further information.

Ben


STATISTICS:           
 
Diagnosed 09/06 at age 49 with PSA 4.6, Gleason 10 (first graded as 8 then regraded as 10), and clinical stage T2a.           
 
Surgery was open radical retropubic 11/08/06 at Johns Hopkins (half way across the country for us.) Surgical pathology was stage T3a with positive margins but negative seminal vesicles, negative lymph nodes, negative on bone scan. Catheter was in for 26 days (not fun) due to blood in urine.       
 
First post op PSA was 0.00 in 12/06.

Post Edited (BenEcho10) : 1/10/2007 11:01:53 AM (GMT-7)

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