B&B's World: PCa & Energetic Healing

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B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 3/11/2007 11:52 PM (GMT -6)   
I am taking Lee's advice and starting a thread with my posts.
March 10

Dear Joe,

I did a lot of research after my husband, age 51, was diagnosed on Dec 5, 06 (Gleason 3+3, T1C, PSA 4.3). His diagnosis was purely PSA driven, and his biopsy showed less than 10% of cells, 4 out of 12 core samples, one side of the prostate only. It became obvious that the robot assisted laparoscopic, nerve sparing proceedure was our treatment of choice and I called the Henry Ford Center for a recommendation on a California surgeon.  My extensive research had led me to believe that the "Veil of Aphrodite" was only a trademark for nerve sparing surgery by Dr. Menon, and I took the percentages of regained potency quoted by this and various other doctors with a grain of salt.  There hasn't been enough time since robot assist, laparoscopic, nerve sparing surgery has been used to gather definitive statistics, in my opinion.  I don't know where you reside, but I can tell you that we went to Dr. Ahlering at UC Irvine, where the Da Vinci machines were developed. By the way, Henry Ford could not recommend a surgeon, but the person there did reiterate that UCI developed the machines they use.  My husband had the surgery on Feb 27, 2007 and had the catheter removed on Mar 6. He had immediate, full continence and (surprisingly) immediate and regular tumescence. Still too sore to attempt intercourse, as he also had two hernias that the doctor repaired, he has already had an erection strong enough for it.  He appears to be in the 30%-50% of men who gain immediate function.  Dr. Ahlering prescribes Viagra (1/4 pill 25mg) per night starting the night after surgery. He also recommends that one continues to take it even if erections are achieved.  Both my husband and I feel that doing everything one can do is important.  On that note, we ate a 60% vegan diet (still had fish and eggs sometimes), went to a support group and tried something that no one has mentioned yet in any venue:  Reiki.  This kind of healing seemed to energize the whole pelvic area as well as create a regular meditation that was most positive, relaxing and fear-relieving.  His last PSA before surgery was down to 3.9.  One last note, the pathology showed cancer in both lobes, with Gleason still at 3+3, negative margins. We are glad we didn't wait, although we had considered it.  Removal while still contained and while the prostate is not too enlarged is optimum.  One last thing, diagnosis in younger men is on the rise, thanks to PSA. I looked specifically for cases and personal postings that my husband could relate to at his age. I hope this helps. Best wishes to you!

Becky

 P.S.  Swimom has a lot of knowledge (thank you!), and clarified the meaning of “Veil of Aphrodite”, in a good post.  I am including here a definition from an abstract from Recent neuroanatomical studies on the neurovascular bundle of the prostate and cavernosal nerves: clinical reflections on radical prostatectomy by Selcuk Yucel, Tibet Erdogru, Mehmet Baykara, Department of Urology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Kampus 07070, Antalya, Turkey

“…recent neuroanatomical finding that showed that the cavernous nerve is not contained in the neurovascular bundle. In fact, it is located in the fascia, so deep that some non-nerve-sparing surgeries may result with inadvertent nerve-sparing surgery [87]. On the other hand, a very delicate nerve-sparing procedure could end with ED, because the proxi mal or distal ends could be damaged. Bhandar et al. [61] proposed a different approach for robotic/laparoscopic radical prostatectomy that did not involve opening the periprostatic fascia, thus leaving all small cavernosal nerves intact within the fascia. They called the neurovascular bundle and cavernosal nerves the "veil of Aphrodite" and developed a technical modification to the nerve sparing procedure that spared the main neurovascular trunk, but dissected a wide band of periprostatic fascia extending from the reflection from the pelvic fascia proximally, puboprostatic ligaments distally, Denonvilliers fascia posteriorly and free edge anteriorly.

Hi,

 

New to this area, but read quite a few posts while deciding what to do.  A couple of factors helped us make the decision between surgery and radiation.  Radiation all but rules out surgery later.  If you have surgery, you can always opt for radiation later, if cancer re-occurs. We spoke to two imminent urological oncologists. Only one in 27 years did a prostatectomy after radiation. He said it was like trying to remove concrete.  The other, whom we ended up having perform a robotic assisted laparoscopic proceedure, said that age should be a consideration.  His opinion is that with 10 years of statistical proof of survival from radiation, it is easier to live with radiation as a choice if you are only looking at 10 to 15 more years of average lifespan.  For someone in their 40's or 50's, 10 to 15 more years is not acceptable, and the chances of retaining function are greater in younger men.  Furthermore, five year studies are now showing that function originally retained with radiation can erode with time.  So, I would say that age and current function would be very important factors to consider in making the choice between radiation and surgery. 

 

Becky

 

March 07

Dear Walt,

Not too long ago B and I were in the same boat. B had been taking herbs ever since his PSA started rising. It rose over 4 years, but the spike from 3.2 to 4.3 in one year caused the primary care physician to recommend a biopsy. Boy, that was not something we wanted to do! But, as he told us, PCa in a man of 51 years old can be fatal. So, we did a few things prior to biopsy. First, we went on a trip to Europe! Then we started some alternative therapy in the form of Reiki. Several sessions a week created a sense of calm, re-vitalization and helped both of us prepare for the procedure. Besides that, it can cure you, and we wanted to give it a chance. Once the biopsy was taken, with positive for cancer in 5-10% of 4 out of 12 samples in one lobe, we got serious about lowering PSA while we researched our options. We turned to a vegan diet. Check out the study done at SF State University and (I think) Sloan Kettering (or Johns Hopkins). They took 95 men who would not do regular treatment for PCa and put half of them on a vegan diet (no dairy, meat or fish), whole grains, fruits and vegetables, had them do moderate exercise, meet in support groups and do meditation. After one year, the protocol stopped or reversed evidence of cancer in the half to the extent that they followed the regimen. Of the other half, the control group, some had to go to conventional therapies due to the spread of the disease, and none had a reversal. Studies are now definitive in showing a link between PCa and high dairy fat and/or red meat intake. Nevertheless, if the mind/body connection, coupled with genetics and environmental factors caused this present situation, did B have the muster to try and radically change the progress of the disease without the aid of modern medical science with complete faith in the desired outcome? Even though his PSA lowered to 3.9 before surgery, as one kind person said in one of these rooms, "It doesnt matter what your PSA is if you have cancer!" In the end, we decided to make healthy changes and use the "insurance" of modern medicine. He had a robot assisted, laparascopic prostatectomy on Feb 27 at a "teaching hospital" and has had an optimal outcome. The biopsy did not show all the cancer; after all, biopsies are somewhat like finding needles in a haystack. But his Gleason stayed at 3+3 and we are happy we got it out. All in all, we took about six months from PSA to surgery, with lots of research and careful consideration. Best of luck to you,

Becky

March 10

B's Biopsy:

Accepting the urologist's recommendation for a biopsy was difficult. There was a lot of worry about pain, especially after the biopsy. We put it off for a month, because we had the trip of a lifetime planned, and didn't want to know until after. But, the whole idea of it was very difficult. B suffers from anxiety in general, and due to this asked his primary care physician about the possibility of receiving some anti-anxiety medication right before the procedure. He directed him to the urologist, saying it was a reasonable request. The urologist's office said that the doctor would administer an IV valium, but that B would have to have someone drive him to the appointment. No problem, I drove him there. After waiting a long time in the waiting room, he was ushered into a cubicle. Nothing was administered, and he waited for 20 minutes looking at what he deemed "instruments of torture", long needles and a "***" shaped instrument, while I waited in the waiting room. He said it was all he could do to keep from walking out of there! When the urologist came in, B asked when he would receive the anti-anxiety meds, and the doctor replied, "You don't need it" B said, "But I specifically asked to have it" Doctor said, "If you insist, but you don't need it. I have already done two of these today and they didn't need it." Angry, B shut down and went through the procedure which, he reported, was uncomfortable but not terribly painful. The worst part was the anxiety leading up to it. Needless to say, B was very angry at the doctor. The incident further exemplified the lack of communication between staff and doctor in this urology group. One week later, after waiting 45 minutes in another cubicle, the doctor came in without even having previously read the report, sit there for 3 minutes and then pronounced, "Well, you have a little cancer" We stumbled out to the desk to make another appointment for a consult after the prescribed blood work, and the young woman couldn't even get B's name right. That did it, we found another urologist after he had the blood work. Our lesson from this was: be pro-active, speak up, find support, find comfort, don't settle for second rate.

Becky

Posted 3/10

Hi DJSydney,

My husband was devastated when he got diagnosed in December '06. He just seemed to fall into a dark hole, while I was galvanized into action, researching, researching, researching.  He couldn't even talk to his family, and I just played pass-interference for him for that week. All my research underscored the importance of joining a support group. On what seemed like the darkest day, I looked up a local group, called the number and got the phone number of a prostate cancer survivor.  At the risk of meddling too far, I called husband at work and said, "All my research states that it is essential to get into a support group. Will you call Mr. XXXX?  Here is his number."  At first he cringed (he told me later) and then took the phone number.  He called me later that day and said that he felt so much better after calling Mr. XXXX.  After that, the clouds parted and he started getting interested in my "hmmmm's" while finding out all I could.  He said that, although it was difficult to swallow, he decided that he should follow all of the recommendations to insure a most positive outcome.  Prostate cancer is a "couple's disease".  I am glad you are going to the next appointment and I hope you find the courage to ask about depression...it goes with the territory, it seems.

Kindest Regards,

Becky

 

March 11, 2007

Dear Walt,

I am so happy that our experience is of help to you. I too wanted B to avoid the discomfort of an "inadequate" biopsy, and read studies on PET scans, ready to spend the money to get a complete "picture" of the prostate. The problem is, there is no reliable isotope for the prostate cancer marker, and even though there is one kind, it cannot distinguish the kind of cancer, when evident. And grading is so important to diagnosis and treatment.

My opinion, after our experience, is that the advances in prostate cancer treatment have left some local and small town urologists in the dust. Despite a generally forgiving attitude, we had to leave our local urologist after experiencing poor, and probably inadvertently uncaring, handling. With PCa, nothing is black and white, and any urologist that is not ready to get into a lengthy discussion is not, in my opinion, worthy of walking down this path with you. If you end up with the diagnosis, and I HOPE NOT!, in my opinion, full caring support is essential to your recovery, from the appointment scheduler on down the line. One of the reasons this website was so helpful was for the support. I learned a lot here while gathering my facts.

Kindest Regards,

Becky

 


Age 51
Gleason 3+3
PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr
Biopsy 11/06
DRE negative
4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%
Inflammation only second lobe
Stage T1C Clinical Dx
PSA prior to surgery: 3.9
Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:
PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland
Gleason 3+3
Negative tissue margins
Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative
Two inguinal hernia repairs
 
 


B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 3/12/2007 10:00 AM (GMT -6)   
Reading about KZIZ and others getting prepared for surgery...
 
On the subject of energetic healing, imagine that the patient and loved ones are connected, because they are!  Ever find yourself thinking of something "out of the blue" and your spouse pipes up and brings the subject up?  This exemplifies our connection with each other.  Finding ways for the couple to be hopeful and centered boosts the immune system and this is a very important aspect of the treatment and recovery!  So, I am happy to hear that a waiting room at a hospital is beautiful and inspiring.  If the partner can find a place in the hospital, during surgery, where worry and tension are minimized, this translates to the patient during the process.  In our case, I asked the surgical admit nurse whether there was a "sacred space" available for me to be able to go into the healing meditation (Reiki) that I do.  I felt it was so important to the process.  She was able to take me to the waiting room of a chaplain's office, which was locked at 7 in the morning. But, they opened it up for me and I was able to avoid the war in Iraq on TV, the little cubicles with concerned, worried families squeezed into them, and the general mayham of a hospital waiting room. 
 
On another subject, it is interesting to note the different instructions from surgeons.  B did not have to go on a liquid diet, nor did he have to do an enema.  The doctor's website instructions called for flushing from above and below, and the prospect was so unappealing that I called and found out he didn't have to do it! I have had laparoscopic procedures and I didn't have to.  It just didn't make sense.
 
We had a small dilemma regarding the removal of the cath, as the surgery was over 300 miles away.  Local urologists are afraid of removing after 7 days...but why wait?  So, we stayed there, a nurses aid removed it, and it was very easy.  We stayed around for another three days, just in case.  But, as reported earlier, B did not even need a pad.
 
Because most of you have concerns about function, I feel the need to report that full (like pre-surgery) function with partner (without Viagra-he didn't have time to take the pill as recommended by doctor) occurred last night, March 11.  It would have happened sooner except that hernia repairs were still sore.  This is less than two weeks after surgery. 
 
Best wishes to Kurt and Courtney for Wed surgery!


Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery
 
 

Post Edited (B&B's World) : 4/28/2007 5:53:49 PM (GMT-6)


pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 3/12/2007 10:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Dear Becky
 
Excellent thread! Your posting will certainly give encouragement to much younger men in an earlier stage of PC. Although I decided on proton radiation at my age (which makes a lot of sense for older men), I am an advocate of surgery for younger men who hopefully have a much longer life span ahead than I do.  I am delighted to hear that your husband did so well from the standpoint of continence and potency after surgery.
 
You are correct that a great majority of surgeons will not do surgery on men who have already had radiation treatment.  However, if the cancer has not spread beyond the prostate, some surgeons will perform surgery to remove the prostate. This is why it is so important not to be defeated when one doctor says "no" as there may well be some great doctors elsewhere who will say "yes" if you seek them out.  It can make the difference between ultimately surviving and not surviving prostate cancer.
 
Here is a quote from the following website which somewhat dispells the belief that one cannot have the prostate surgically removed after radiation treatment--it is well worth reading. 
 
 
here is a quote from this website:
 
"Frequently Urologists will tell a patient that they cannot have surgery following failed radiation of any kind. They use this to convince a patient that they have better options following failure if they have surgery. They can and are very convincing about this and it is commonly accepted by the patient that it is true. However it is not true and salvage surgery can be done following failed radiation. Some Urologists may not have the skills to do it and therefore will talk against it. But there are enough papers and studies and discussions at the AUA meetings that every Urologists should know that it is possible."
 
Some believe that if a PC patient is treated first with radiation that such radiation may actually kill some cancer in the margins that surgery might miss or be unable to remove.  Therefore, there may be some advantage to radiation over surgery depending on the circumstances.  Keep in mind that the percentage of PC patients who have recurring PC sometime after surgery is not insignificant. "According to the American Cancer Society, 40 percent of men have local recurrence of the disease after surgery, and 11 percent are at high-risk of the recurrent disease spreading to other organs." The key to a potential cure is getting some form of treatment as early as possible.  Watchful waiting is a fool's game!
 
Continued good luck. 
 
Dave


68, Biopsy 9/27/06, Stage T1c, PSA 7.1, Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two areas], Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in third area], negative DRE, bone scan and MRI. Starting proton radiation therapy 2/22/07.

Post Edited (pcdave) : 3/12/2007 10:40:50 AM (GMT-6)


B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 3/12/2007 11:01 AM (GMT -6)   
Dear Dave,  Thank you...Your contribution here is formidable and so helpful too.  In our doctor's instructions it stated that, upon commencement of surgery, if observable cancer was found outside the prostate, surgery would be stopped.  This follows the protocol you mentioned.  And, come to think of it, the surgeon who told us he wont operate after radiation also did not do robot assist surgery.
 
Kindest Regards,
Becky
Age 51
Gleason 3+3
PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr
Biopsy 11/06
DRE negative
4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%
Inflammation only second lobe
Stage T1C Clinical Dx
PSA prior to surgery: 3.9
Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:
PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland
Gleason 3+3
Negative tissue margins
Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative
Two inguinal hernia repairs
 
 


pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 3/12/2007 5:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Dear Becky

In your previous post you said "In our doctor's instructions it stated that, upon commencement of surgery, if observable cancer was found outside the prostate, surgery would be stopped. This follows the protocol you mentioned. And, come to think of it, the surgeon who told us he wont operate after radiation also did not do robot assist surgery."

This is a standard protocol for many doctors and I guess it is their right to do so. However, it infuriates me because PC patients are led to believe it is the norm and what one doctor does, they all do. There are some great humanitarian and competent doctors out there, if you can find them, who will go the extra mile to treat patients and save their life where possible. I think that many doctors are "gun shy" today because of the potential for law suits and the high cost of liability insurance. Our health care system in this country has reached a depressing and dismal state in many cases. We, as patients, just have to work that much harder to hopefully find the expert and dedicated doctors who have our best interests at heart and not theirs.

Dave
68, Biopsy 9/27/06, Stage T1c, PSA 7.1, Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two areas], Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in third area], negative DRE, bone scan and MRI. Starting proton radiation therapy 2/22/07.


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 3/12/2007 10:35 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi ~ Becky  & Loved Ones,

 

Caring Enough to Share…..

 

 

                A   “Special”  Warm Welcome  to  You!   yeah   

 

This is truly a great forum!!! ~ You have joined! You are now part our forum family ~ a group of wonderful individuals who are so willing to share their journey.  Thank you for joining all of us in the continued road to HealingWell…..

 

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER... and POWER conquers fear

 

 

Our thoughts and prayers are with you.

In Friendship ~ Lee & Buddy

 

“God Bless You”

 

It's a little prayer  ~  "God Bless You"

...but it means so much each day,

It means may angels guard you

and guide you on your  way

 

 This is “YOUR” rainbow

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

 

Rainbows brings smiles, smiles bring positive energy into our being!!!


mama bluebird - Lee & Buddy… from North Carolina

Link to our personal journey…>>>     Our Journey ~ Sharing is Caring 

April 3, 2006  53 on surgery day

RRP / Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy with "wide excision"

PSA 4.6   Gleason  3+3=6    T2a   Confined to Prostate

2nd PSA 02-06-2007 Less than 0.1 Non-Detectable :)


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 3/12/2007 10:42 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi! Becky ~

 

This thread is WONDERFUL!!!!  yeah

 

Thank you for taking time to post all your information you’ve shared… because it is “Your Journey” and it needs to be told in "1" location.   Your writing is very soothing.  Thank you for sharing…

 

I will be adding your thread to the Helpful Hints page with my next update!!!

 

In New Friendship ~  Lee & Buddy


mama bluebird - Lee & Buddy… from North Carolina

Link to our personal journey…>>>     Our Journey ~ Sharing is Caring 

April 3, 2006  53 on surgery day

RRP / Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy with "wide excision"

PSA 4.6   Gleason  3+3=6    T2a   Confined to Prostate

2nd PSA 02-06-2007 Less than 0.1 Non-Detectable :)


B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 3/13/2007 9:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you Lee, Buddy, Tony... I feel directed to share, in this thread called PCa and Energetic Healing, the details of "energy work" (e.g.Reiki, chakra balancing, theraputic touch) and the positive influence this adjunct therapy can have on outcome. This will be coming at some length over the next few posts. I have added two details to our signature to show that the absolute optimum outcome can be achieved!

Kindest Regards,

Becky


Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery
 
 

Post Edited (B&B's World) : 3/13/2007 9:46:06 AM (GMT-6)


TonyB
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 37
   Posted 3/13/2007 10:09 AM (GMT -6)   
Becky;

Great outcome! yeah

B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 3/19/2007 1:03 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Pete42! Like you my husband is 51 yrs old, and I thought I would bump to the top in case you are interested in our situation. Your DX sounds a lot like ours. I still need to paste in some of my responses to some other threads, and I'd like you to know that there are very caring, informed contributors. You will get a lot of info here. I addressed our doctor's succinct take on radiation vs surgery in a man of your age in my thread

Kind Regards,

Becky

Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery
 
 


Pete42
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 114
   Posted 3/19/2007 1:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks Becky, I have looked into Robotic Laproscopic at City of Hope, I was quite impressed at the top of my list at the moment. Going out to talk to the folks at Loma Linda in a couple of weeks re: prton therapy.

B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 4/28/2007 12:21 AM (GMT -6)   
I am bumping up this thread for Carl, inserting the post on the Veil thread--we went to Ahlering and were very happy. FYI, he is very focused on continence and had great pre-op advice specific to BP meds that we did not get from the other surgeon we interviewed. Thinking back, Ahlering did not appear to address the potency issue with the same focus. But he did look closely at the history we submitted. And he takes another one just before surgery. He has a very good system for finding out exactly who YOU are with these detailed questionnaires. I personally think that all PCa's should get professional counseling regarding sexual quality of life. Some urologic oncologists do require counseling, but I did not know this pre-surgery.

Hey Joes and Everyone! 4/28/07
This is just a check-in to give a quick report-B's surgery was 8 1/2 weeks ago. The only bump in the road was about three weeks after surgery (B went back to work 2 weeks after), when he noticed that stress incontinence required a "dick diaper" in his words. (BTW, we sent away for some small "sleeves" that work great) He was a little bummed out about that, but also realized he was back to drinking a lot of tea and coffee. He also had been feeling so normal that he wasn't being conscientious about the Kegel exercises. Now he contracts his muscles when getting up out of a chair, or before coughing or sneezing and that does the trick-no dribbles.
Still on the nightly 1/4 pill of Viagra, plus 100mg before sex. We count ourselves extremely blessed--morning erections are there like before--night ones no problem either---we didn't expect it but that function came back immediately.
The nerves were spared nicely, according to our Dr. Ahlering. There was no talk of the Veil of Aphrodite, but I would not be surprised if he spared the nerves in the same way as Dr. Menon. Think about it: if there is a special technique with the RALP regarding the nerves, wouldn't any top notch surgeon (or artist, as Swim would say) using the proceedure learn it? Any comments on that?

Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery
 
 


Joes411
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 87
   Posted 4/28/2007 9:23 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Becky,

Thanks for the update. I'm happy to hear that your husbands recovery is going well. His stats are very similar to mine so I have been watching your progress closely. I like your perspective on diet and have improved my already good diet to an even better level. I believe from what I read that controlling inflammation is very important to healthy recovery and I think diet plays a key role in that.

My surgery is in a few weeks on 5/17 at COH. Send some positive energy my way ;o)

Joe

Age: 51

PSA  Jun06  4.1  (PSA Jun05  1.2)   DRE negative

1st Biopsy Nov06 – Atypical cells but no cancer

2nd Biopsy Jan07 – 1 of 16 cores positive

Stage T1c   Gleason  3+3=6

DaVinci scheduled for mid May


B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 4/28/2007 6:51 PM (GMT -6)   
Dear Joe,

Please email me at (Edit e-mail) as soon as you can and I will talk to you about some additional help to that end ;o)

Becky

Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery

 

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stkitt
Elite Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 4/28/2007 9:03 PM (GMT -6)   

Dear Becky,

What a strong person you are and truly a well informed wife to have come to such a superior understanding of Prostate cancer.

I wish all patients and their families would advocate for themselves as that is the best way to know about the disease process and make informed decisions.

Posting all your threads here was brillant as members can read through them  and see the progress and outcome your husband has made.

A positive outlook on life is a hallmark of resilient individuals. It is not what happens to us but our response to it that predicts our emotional health. You are obviously a  resilient person and loving individual.

I am honored to meet you.

 


 
Respectfully
 
Kitt
 
Depression 25 years, Husband Crohns Disease 30 years
__________________________________________________ 
"If you doubt you can accomplish something, then you can’t accomplish it. You have to have confidence in your ability, and then be tough enough to follow through.”
Rosalyn Carter
 


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 4/28/2007 9:06 PM (GMT -6)   
tap tap tap.....and just where have you been Miss Becky? Missed you much!

Swim

B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 5/29/2007 3:10 PM (GMT -6)   
Okay, Swim, its time for an ED update from B&B's World! After focusing a lot of attention and energy (Reiki and Orgone) in our root areas (mine too) we got back to a semblance of regularity after the surgery. That meant not as much sex as the six months before surgery! This is partly because we both work our heinies off in our professions, and exhaustion and stress are not conducive. But B takes his Viagra every night and gets some stimulation. We are lucky in that B gets erections good enough for penetration. But what we have noticed (and this happened, at times, before PCa due to BP meds and, perhaps, resultant anxiety) is that the erection suitable for penetration ends up softening quite a bit soon after entry. This causes a feeling of urgency on both our parts to try and "finish". Usually this means B finishes, but not me. So, we decided to augment our foreplay with something we have not tried before--toys! The brochure with the german-made one had some very neat looking, and very pliable appearing, well-engineered objects! The penis rings looked jelly-like and not at all what I have pictured them being (from the above posts). Anyway, without getting into detail, I will report back. Thank you...
Becky

Okay-report back now--the toys are fun. B was worried that I would like plastic better than him. I asked him whether he was interested in looking for a plastic vagina. He said, "No, I like the way you feel to me better than the way I think plastic would feel" and I said, "There's my answer to you too--you're much better than any plastic thing to me!"

This toy thing is about enhancing our time with each other, to laugh and find new ways to satisfy...to take the pressure off...our first "playdate" with these adjuncts resulted in a lot of laughter, some augmented sensations, and another way to have the intimacy we want.

Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery
 
 


B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 5/29/2007 3:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello All,
 
I kept reading the posts about the first PSA blood test after surgery. I guess I was just so relieved to get the surgery behind us that I didn't anticipate the anxiety surrounding our first blood test and doctors appointment.  Besides, B and I are so different in one remarkable aspect.  What he doesn't know doesn't hurt him; what I don't know drives me crazy!
 
He got the blood work last week, but asked the lab to fax to Dr. Ahlering's office without giving B the results!  "Ignorance is bliss" when it comes to B--he was feeling nervous about the results and didn't want to know over the weekend. 
 
The pressure of not knowing started building and building for me.  By the time today rolled around, I was really feeling anxious. I didn't say anything to B about it, but he decided to get the results today and and I am relieved to report that his PSA is less than .03. Based upon what I have seen reported here, its fabulous news!
 
Thanks all of you who lend support. You all are fabulous too!
 
Becky

Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery
 
 


Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 5/29/2007 6:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Becky ... Isn't that a relief to finally have them!!

Can't imagine knowing they were in and having to wait over a long weekend! Would have driven me nuts!

So glad for ya all :)

Tanya
Age: 63
Diagnosed: 10/30/06
PSA: 3.7 (2005: 3.4, 2004: 4.0)
Biopsy: 1/10 cancerous, 5% of one core, right apex.
Gleason: 3+3=6
Da Vinci: April 10, 2007, Denver CO
Path results: 1% of prostate involved. Very small tumors on both right and left apex. Negative margins, negative seminal vessicles, lymph nodes left intact. Gleason upgraded 3+4=7.
1st PSA Results: May 11, 2007 <.01
 


Joes411
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 87
   Posted 5/30/2007 8:10 AM (GMT -6)   
Congratulations B&B, .03 is a great number. Hope you guys have a long lifetime of numbers just like that.

Cheers,
Joe

Age: 51

PSA  Jun06  4.1  (PSA Jun05  1.2)   DRE negative

1st Biopsy Nov06 – Atypical cells but no cancer

2nd Biopsy Jan07 – 1 of 16 cores positive

Stage T1c   Gleason  3+3=6

DaVinci scheduled for 5/17/07


B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 5/30/2007 10:16 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you, Joe.  I had a momentary fear that the .03 was not small enough...see how this can get to one?  BTW, there was a study completed in July of '06 showing that pomegranite juice halves the doubling time of PSA when it increases after treatment. We are on our way to the 3 month post op with Dr. Ahlering, but I will paste in here if I can when we return.  I hope you are continuing to feel good.  B had some incontinence a few weeks after surgery, even with the "bone dry" beginning.  It discouraged him at first, but got perspective on it. He still has a few dribbles, but he has not been consistent with the Kegels...
 
So long for now,
 
Becky

Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery

Full potency, 12th day after surgery
 
 


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 5/31/2007 7:53 AM (GMT -6)   

 Yea !  ~   B & Becky,

 

1st…..PSA…   !!!~~~~>>>  Woo~Hoo  <<<~~~~!!!  undetectable

 

Cause  for   celebration!!!!!

     What a wonderful day it is ~ each and every-day….

          Enjoy it to the fullest ~ friend.

 

Yippeeeee!!!!!! From  Lee & Buddy

 

*     *     *     *     *     *

The ultimate “goal”… we all strive for… Thank you for sharing ~ that your goal has been met….

It is very important to “all ”of us!  This is a way of positive feedback…

A way of showing others Hope… and a way of Sharing.  

J  Caring is Sharing ~  Thank You for Sharing  J


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 5/31/2007 8:00 AM (GMT -6)   

Becky ~

I loved your post about the “toys”…. Wonderful communication you share with each other!!!  Enjoy your “playdates”.  Thank you for sharing.   tongue

It is so important….to realize that “all physical contact” helps to heal the mental anxieties.  

In Friendship ~ Lee & Buddy


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 2/3/2008 10:15 AM (GMT -6)   
Bump for B&B.

God Bless you, Happy anniversary.

Tony
Age 45 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8
Surgery on Feb 16, 2007
Post-Op Pathology was poor: Gleason 4+3=7, 4 positive margins, Stage pT3b (Stage III)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
 
My PSA did drop out after surgery to undetectable.  It has not returned and I will continue HT until January '08.
 
My Life is supported very well by family and friends like you all.
 
Visit my journey at:
 
STAY POSITIVE!


B&B's World
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 2/3/2008 10:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Hello Everyone!  I have been trying to find our original thread B&B's World-Energetic Healing-because it has, pretty much, our whole story.  Can't find it tonight and couldn't find it a few weeks ago. Oh well.  I just wanted to say that this year has been a blessing.  Life is so precious and we feel so lucky.  Had a great doc who is an expert on continence; discovering just how much of the urethra to spare in order to retain the sensation that allows for control.  B does not even know he's missing his prostate--honest, I asked him!  Despite some disappointment he felt during the year regarding the strength of erections--it was really related to previous BP issues, and for the last six months he has been on a regular weight-lifting/cardio workout program which has reduced his BP and need for certain medications.  Surprise, surprise, the second part of the prostate issue is greatly improved--almost like our days of youth!  Anyway, B just went for the year checkup and the doc said, "Whatever you're doing, keep doing it!"  Its nice to see him feeling better in every way.  By the way, Reiki (healing energy work) got us through the crisis-for those of you out there willing to do EVERYTHING-we both highly recommend it.  Best to all of you wonderful people! Becky  P.S. Found our story--thanks to Bluebird, its on her welcome page in the "Our Journey" section-Thank you! (and thanks for the bump Tony-I love reading all of the success stories in here!)

Age 51

Gleason 3+3

PSA from 3.2 to 4.3 in one yr

Biopsy 11/06

DRE negative

4 of 12 cores positive, one lobe, less than 10%

Inflammation only second lobe

Stage T1C Clinical Dx

PSA prior to surgery: 3.9

Da Vinci Prostatectomy 2/27/07:

PCa in BOTH lobes 5-10% of gland

Gleason 3+3

Negative tissue margins

Bladder, seminal ves, vas deferntia negative

Two inguinal hernia repairs

Catheter removed 1 wk after surgery

Full continence (no pad needed) 1 wk after surgery, then intermittent drips 4 wks out

Full erection, 12th day after surgery

2 mo’s post-op, some ED after penetration

3 month PSA 0.03

6 month PSA non-existent

1 year   PSA  non-existent

Erectile function--up and running!

 

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