why are there so few that have Brachytherapy ??

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4carl
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/9/2007 9:20 AM (GMT -7)   
I've looked at all the postings on this board back to 2004. What I dont under stand is why so few choose Brachytherapy ? Lots of canadates, gleason 6s ect but I could only find a hand full of men that had Brachytherapy. Is there something i'm missing ? I'm on the fence betweem the robot and Brachytherapy. Any more infomation would be very helpfull in my decision..thanks carl
stats 61 psa 5.1 up from 3.4 in a yr free psa 6%
patholgy gleason 6 T1c


oldfordlover
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 5/9/2007 9:56 AM (GMT -7)   
Brachytheraphy takes special training. I know that my doctor was just recently trained and is still being supervised by the doctor from Texas that trained him. I think if I hadn't been so far along, I would have tried it. I liked that he could get a wider margin that he thought he could surgically. In my case I would have had to had a lymph biopsy anyway, which was going to be major surgery. At any rate it is nice to evaluate all the options.

I hope things go well for you

David
Age 50
Diagnosed 4/24/07
PSA 5.5
cancer in 8 of 12 biopsy samples
gleason score 4+4=8; up to 70% pti;
some perineural invasion
surgery scheduled 5/23/07


Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 5/9/2007 12:43 PM (GMT -7)   

Carl:

I think that seeds are a relatively new procedure; therefore it takes time to establish a record.  Also, the placement of the seeds is very important and don't know how many doctors are really proficient at this.  I would think it would be important to find a doctor with many procedures under his belt.  There is also the fact that some of the seeds do migrate (leave the prostate) - I had read at one time it was thought that as much as 29% could migrate.  Just some of my observations.

Good luck on your journey to find a treatmen that suits YOU.

Dutch


Diagnosed Feb 2001  (Age 65)  Currently 71
PSA 4.8
Gleason 3 + 3 = 6
T2b
Completed Proton therapy @ Loma Linda - Aug 2001
5yr PSA   0.17
Have had no side effects.


Gordy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 528
   Posted 5/9/2007 1:14 PM (GMT -7)   
"...some of the seeds do migrate (leave the prostate)". True, but not true with HDR brachy - no seeds are left in the body after the procedure.

-Gordy

Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 5/9/2007 1:16 PM (GMT -7)   
4Carl,
 
It's just a coincidence that more surgery candidates have ended up on this site than folks who chose other procedures. Birds of a feather perhaps has something to do with whom ends up on what fourms. :-)
 
swim
 
 

Dave85c4
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 5/9/2007 2:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Welcome,
I'm one of few here myself that choose seeds. I had made my mind up right from the beginning that I was not having surgery. So I had the options of seeds, ext rad. or hormone. My Uro is a surgen and he suggested seeding as well as my rad.guy. My main concern was quality of life not length. After reading about the side effects all these treatments have I decided on the seeds. But everyone has to make the best choice for their own peace of mind. I'm 59, I had a glesson of 6, psa of 2.6, 2 of 12 cores showed cancer. My doctor has done about 700 seedings and the rad has done about 2,000. right now I'm 3 months post seeding and things are going fairly well, have a few small problems but nothing thats really bad. Just remeber you have to be happy with your choice, just do the research and make your choice. You may want to go to a man-to-man meeting at the ACS and talk to some of the guys there. Good luck on whatever you decide.

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 5/9/2007 3:32 PM (GMT -7)   

Hello Carl and welcome to HealingWell.

I am Kitt. I looked at some of the major Cancer Centers and there seems to be a fairly large number that have the equipmenpt, technology and physicians with the training.

From what I understand there are two major methods of prostate brachytherapy, permanent seed implantation and high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy.

In the end, you need to do your own analysis in terms of the theoretical differences, potential cure rates, side effects, cost, time away from work, and location of treatment centers, to decide what treatment is right for you.

You have my support in your choice of treatment.  As someone so wisely mentioned, at this time, in this forum, more members have opted for other modalities of treatment. That does not negate your choice.
 
Gentle Hugs
 
Respectfully
 
Kitt
 
Moderator Prostate Cancer Forum
 
RN CCRN, Critical Care/ Emergency Department Mgr.
 
Depression 25 years, Husband Crohns Disease 30 years
My Father and 5 siblings all died of Cancer. __________________________________________________ 
"If you doubt you can accomplish something, then you can’t accomplish it. You have to have confidence in your ability, and then be tough enough to follow through.”
Rosalyn Carter
 


Cedar Chopper
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 432
   Posted 5/9/2007 4:14 PM (GMT -7)   

Carl,

I think there are several reasons more surgery candidates seem to post here than others. 

I'm not sure the answer to that question is helpful to you for the task of your decision!

nono  DO NOT MAKE YOUR DECISION FROM INFORMATION FROM ANY ONE SOURCE! nono

It is a VERY complex decision with many subtleties. While the physicians and specialists offer neat, one-size-fits-all decision trees, you will make the final decision based on your circumstances as only you understand them. 

Talk to experts practicing every type of treatment you consider.  Recognize their passion for what they do as you consider their advice.  Then, put it all on the "back burner" for a day or two (Don't wait too long.) before you test a decision in your mind.  (I would pray about it!)  THEN, GET A SECOND OPINION FROM AN EXTREMELY QUALIFIED PHYSICIAN.

Your question is observant.  Ignoring an option is likely an uninformed decision.

Keeping you in good thoughts.

CCedar

 


~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*
2 Years of PSA between 4 and 5.5
Biopsy 23DEC06 
Only 5 percent cancer in one of 8 samples.
Gleeson 3+3=6
Radical Prostatectomy 16FEB07 at age 54.
1+" tumor - touching inside edge of gland.
Confined:)
***************
Texas Hill Country
FRESH Produce Department Manager
Have you had your 5 colors today?


Rufus
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 31
   Posted 5/9/2007 6:25 PM (GMT -7)   

 

Carl,
I had an rrp and then later 36 EBRT radiation treatments. I think to some degree it comes to and should be personal choice. In my case I had a Gleason 3+4 and in Ontario Canada we cannot get brachy done under our Prov meds insurance if the gleason is above 6, unless you are willing to pay the whole shot. My private insurance would not pay for brachy either so I went the RRP surgery instead of radiation, a good choice since I ended up having to do the radiation as a second treatment.

Some I think just prefer to 'have it out'. Whether they believe that there is a good chance to get it all with this primary treatment or whether they think that they would just debulk a high percentage of the PCa I don't know.  As a patient i would suggest that you check each one out carefully and pick the treatment that you feel is best for you.

I wish you well! :-)

Russ D


Diagnosed: August 05 T1c 1 of 10 cores positive 5% vol no palpable on DRE Gleason 3+4 or 7
Surgury: RRP Dec 05
Pathology: Jan 06 PT3 20% PCa total volume bilateral 4 positive margins Gleason 3+4 seminal vesicles clear LN not checked extraprostatic extension positive right base and right central anterior no perineural invasion HG PIN present both nerve bundles saved
PSA: Mar 06 0.87 referred to radiation oncologist
PSA: May 06 1.1 June 06 Began 36 treatments EBRT 64 Gy ending July 06
HT: 2 weeks casodex 50 mg, then Lupron Depot 7.5 monthly for 18 to 24 months - monotherapy
PSA: Sept 06 <0.1 (lowest reading on assay) Testosterone (T) <0.4 (lowest on assay)
PSA: Mar 07 <0.1  T <0.4   {:>)


4carl
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 5/9/2007 8:24 PM (GMT -7)   
Dave,what seeds did they use and what problems are you having. thanks carl

stats 61 psa 5.1 up from 3.4 in a yr free psa 6%
patholgy gleason 6 T1c


lifeguyd
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 664
   Posted 5/9/2007 8:52 PM (GMT -7)   

 

Please correct me if I am wrong.  I think I read somewhere that the numbers are about the same.  That is, as many men have brachytherapy as have surgery.  I tried to do an online search, but could not confirm this statement. 

This forum, for whatever reason, is mostly populated by those who have chosen surgery.  I think it is important to have posts from ALL different experiences.

When I first began to study different treatment methods, I found only brachytherapy patients who I could talk to.  In fact, of the handful of current PCa people I know personally. I am the only one who chose surgery.  My gleason was higher than any of those others and that is partially why I decided on surgery. My friends who chose brachytherapy are satisfied with th results.  Most have not had after procedure complications.  Only one has serious urinary problems some 8 months past brachtherapy.

Hope you find the answers you need.


 
Biopsy 10/16/06
T2A,  PSA 4.7
Gleason 4+4=8 right side
adrenocarcinoma of prostate
DaVinci Surgery 01/16/07
Post op report,confirms Gleason4+4=8
no extra extension/invasion identified
age 65
Back on the golf course...
90 day PSA  less than 0.01 (undetectable)
 
 


stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 5/10/2007 7:08 AM (GMT -7)   

Dear Lifeguyd

Good Morning.  I did do a search for statistics on the procedures but could not come up with any that gave the info re how many of each types of surgeries had been performed.

Maybe someone else has that info.

Thank you and bless you.

 


 
Respectfully
 
Kitt
 
Moderator Prostate Cancer Forum
 
RN CCRN, Critical Care/ Emergency Department Mgr.
 
Depression 25 years, Husband Crohns Disease 30 years
My Father and 5 siblings all died of Cancer. __________________________________________________ 
"If you doubt you can accomplish something, then you can’t accomplish it. You have to have confidence in your ability, and then be tough enough to follow through.”
Rosalyn Carter
 


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 5/10/2007 3:17 PM (GMT -7)   
4Carl,

Try Entrez Pubmed, Urology Times, Medscape Urology, prostateline.com These may get you headed in a self help direction on study/statistical information. Got more whaere these come from if you're interested but this shuold get you started. There are thousands of articles a person could wade through so take it slow. You don't to get burned out to soon. I, myself, have read approximately 10,000 studies and articles on PCa in the last 2 years. It's been an education to say the least. Take care.

Swim

Dave85c4
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 5/10/2007 3:27 PM (GMT -7)   
I had the I 125 seeds, 74 of them. As far as problems I got a slight infection from the overnight catheter. A couple bouts of IBS, but like I said very minor compared to what I have read of some other guys. I only get up maybe once per night and some days the stream is weak but others it is fine. I'm only about 3 months out so it is a waiting game to see what finally happens. Just do your research and then decide what you feel is best. I was going to do watchful waiting but the "noise" from the wife wasn't worth it LOL. Like I had said, quiality of life is my most important thing, not length.

Dave85c4
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 5/10/2007 3:33 PM (GMT -7)   
Carl, check out this link maybe you can find some info that helps.
Dave
https://www.cancer.nexcura.com/Secure/InterfaceSecure.asp?CB=265

pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 5/10/2007 4:54 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Carl

I understand your frustration in wondering why there are so few brachytherapy patients here! I chose Proton Radiation Therapy and am in a minority here. This forum, as you have seen, is composed mainly of members who have chosen surgery. Nevertheless, I came here more to help others than to seek help. If you have read my thread entitled "Proton Radiation Therapy--My Journey With Prostate Cancer", I indicate why I opted for Proton Therapy and rejected all other treatments, including brachytherapy.

I think the key with brachytherapy is to find the best surgeon to perform the seed implants. As with all of the treatments for PCa, finding an expert doctor is often key in giving you a greater chance of achieving success after treatment (but obviously there is never a guarantee success no matter how expert the doctor is). If you want to go to a website where you can read of the stories of men who have elected the various forms of treatment for PCa, I suggest that you go to www.yana.com (you are not alone) and you should find some postings by men who have had brachytherapy (principally implant of seeds). I don't think that HDR (temporary implant of seeds) is that popular today and many medical centers who do the seed implant may not offer the HDR.

I have read that many men have had successful seed implants with minimal side effects. On the other hand, I have heard that some men experience some unpleasant urinary side effects (very slow urination and sometimes inability to urinate which requires a catheter for some period of time or other medical intervention). Some of the other negatives were well covered by "Dutch" in his posting above.

I think the key is for you to do as much research as possible about the potential side effects of this treatment, the percentage of men who experience them and to talk with other men who have had seed implants. This forum will be of limited help to you in doing so, at least at this time. If you do go forward with the seed implants, I hope that you will become an active member and enlighten others about this therapy. I have tried to so the same about Proton Therapy. If you have not seriously explored and considered Proton Therapy for your treatment, you should do so. The key is selecting the treatment that you feel is best for you!

Best of luck to you!

Dave
68, Biopsy 9/27/06, Stage T1c, PSA 7.1, Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two areas], Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in third area], negative DRE, bone scan and MRI. Starting proton radiation therapy 2/22/07. Treatments completed 4/18/07.

Post Edited (pcdave) : 5/10/2007 5:57:21 PM (GMT-6)


Michael's Wife
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 150
   Posted 1/26/2008 5:32 AM (GMT -7)   
I was doing a search and just thought I'd bump this to the top for anyone else who was wondering the same thing. I often feel the bias here towards surgery. I'll probably become one of those who disappears from this forum, becoming one less to provide information on experience with brachytherapy. This will happen for two reasons: I'm tired of defending my husband's choice (a choice which we both feel strongly was the right one), and secondly, my husband is having absolutely no physical issues from the seeds, so I have no overriding personal reason to be here other than to lend an ear or a shoulder to others. Normally that would be enough, but the negativity that comes across regarding what I feel is an often better option than surgery - and towards our personal choice - just isn't worth it.

My best to all of you as you continue on the road toward full recovery.


Husband: Age 58
Stage: T1c
Gleason: 6 (3+3)
PSA: 4.4
Biopsy: 12 samples, Adenocarcinoma involving 3 cores, right side only (95%, 90%, 30%, discontinuously)

Pre-op prostate study - November 13
Brachytherapy - December 12, 2007
CT Scan - January 11, 2008

So far, so good!


Gordy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 528
   Posted 1/26/2008 7:51 AM (GMT -7)   
There's more to talk about with surgery - side effects, dripping, pads, ED etc. Those of us who've had brachy don't have a heck of a lot to talk/complain about.

Try looking up a particular appliance or drug on the 'Net - most of the folks who post are the ones who have problems and hate the item.

-Les

Gordy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 528
   Posted 1/26/2008 10:15 AM (GMT -7)   
Ziggy9-

Two great minds with but a single thought. One a "man of few words" and the other an eloquent writer.

-Les

Jayadub
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 89
   Posted 1/26/2008 4:25 PM (GMT -7)   

Some of us have an aversion to having things implanted in our body. Some of us have an aversion to cutting and the subsequent complications or side effects. Some of us feel that Quality and Quantity are important.

Your Mileage May Vary.


54 years old

PSA 5.6 on 3/20/07

DRE: Negative

Biopsy on 4/20/07 

Results 4/25/07:

3 out of 12 cores positive, 2 on the right lobe with 5% adenocarcinoma Gleason 3+3, 1 on the left lobe 10% adenocarcinoma Gleason 3+4, overall Gleason graded 7 Cancer T1C.  After web research discovered Proton Beam Therapy and called Loma Linda. Completed consultation with Dr. Luu on 7/5/2007 and started treatment at Loma Linda on 7/26/07. Completed treatment 44 on 9/28/07. 0 treatments remain. Side Effects remain minimal. 1st PSA scheduled for end of Jan. 08.


pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 1/26/2008 6:39 PM (GMT -7)   
I put my two cents in here back in May 2007--see above.  While I was willing to subject my body to radiation (i.e., proton radiation), I ruled out seeds after extensive research.  While many men have had great success with the seed implants, some men have also had unpleasant urinary problems after seed implants.  The risk is that some of the seeds have to be implanted close to the uretha.  For some men, this can result in subsequent constrictions of the uretha, including complete blockage which has to be treated.  Before treatment, I feared potential urinary problems more than anything.  I am acquainted with a nurse practictioner at a major cancer treatment center who assists with the seed implants.  She told me that some of the patients do have subsequent urinary problems which have to be treated.  I have not had any urinary problems associated with my proton radiation treatments completed nine months ago.  It appears, based on research and direct contact with other patients treated with proton radiation, that they experience virtually no urinary problems after treatment; any urinary problems experienced during treatment are usually minor and disappear after treatment. In fact, while I never had any urinary problems before treatment, my urine flow seems even better now.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, I did not opt for proton radiation solely because I felt it was the best treatment to avoid potential urinary problems.  With my due diligence and medical consultations, I was able to conclude that my chance of a cure with proton radiation was just about equivalent to any other form of treatment, with a smaller risk of potential negative side effects.
 
I only wish that we had more members here who have had treatments other than surgery so that they can get the word out to those needing help in selecting among too many treatment choices.  Does that mean that those who did not elect surgery have had fewer side effects to deal with after treatment, and therefore don't need a forum like this?  Perhaps so.  I decided to participate here because I want to educate others about my journey with proton radiation and also to help other PCa patients no matter what treatment they select.  When I first was diagnosed with PCa, I didn't know anything about proton radiation--it didn't seem to be in the main stream of PCa treatments.  It was more difficult to find definitive research, statistics on the success of this treatment and to find others to network with who had this treatment.  With a lot of digging I did eventually get all of the help and information I needed to make an informed decision that proton radiation was best for me.  It seems that proton radiation treatments for PCa patients are now becoming more main stream, especially with many new proton treatments centers opening up around the U.S.  Proton radiation treatment, which has been around for several decades on a smaller scale until recently,  is used to treat many kinds of cancer.
 
Any treatment we select has potential downside risks.  We just have to decide, based upon the known risks of any treatment, what we are willing to risk in relation to the peace of mind, potential for a cure and quality of life we are trying to achieve after treatment.  The tough decision unfortunately is ours and ours alone!


-69 years young!
-29 core biopsy 9/27/06 at age 68
-PSA 7.1, Stage T1c, Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in one area], Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two other areas], Negative DRE, bone scan and Endorectal MRI. 
-Completed 39 Proton radiation treatments 2/22/07-4/18/07.   
-PSA History: 7.1 pre-treatment; post treatment: 2.1 (3 mo.), 2.4 (6 mo.), 1.7 (9 mo). Radiation oncologist said the 3-mo. drop of 70% exceeded expectations and the slight 6-mo. movement upwards was not a cause for concern now.
-The following is a link to My Journey With Prostate Cancer -- Proton RadiationTherapy.  
 
 

Post Edited (pcdave) : 1/26/2008 6:55:50 PM (GMT-7)


Gordy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2005
Total Posts : 528
   Posted 1/26/2008 7:27 PM (GMT -7)   
What the previous two posters have ignored is HDR brachy. I had 5 weeks of external beam and then HDR. Nothing is left in your body and I have had no urinary problems since my Tx in July and August 2005. And, although I've got other problems, my PSA is still undetectable.

-Les
1/2005 Dx PSA 26.5 Gleason 7 (4+3) @Age 61
1/2005 Start Casodex and Zoladex
PSA drops to <0.01 AND REMAINS THERE TO THIS DAY
7/2005-8/2005 5 weeks of IMRT and then HDR brachy
1/2007 Rad Oncologist orders CT scan of pelvis
because of complaints of pain in both thighs
MRI confirms pain not caused by cancer BUT
1/2007 CT scan of pelvis picks up a nodule at bottom of left lung
5/2007 CT scan of lungs shows 1/2007 nodule has grown and
there are numerous nodules on both lungs.
6/2007 Thoracic surgeon removes wedge of left lung for biopsy
6/2007 Path report says 95% chance of metastatic PCa, but she's
never seen cells like this before.
7/2007 2nd opinion at M.D. Anderson in Houston.
They confirm: mutated PCa, very rare, but seen there 2 or
3 times. Recommendation: have CT scans every 6 weeks
and watch for change. At that point start chemo and will
survive for 22 - 24 months thereafter.
PSA STILL UNDETECTABLE


Dutch
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 400
   Posted 1/26/2008 9:12 PM (GMT -7)   

Ziggy:

Just for info purposes - only about 1/3 of the Pca patients getting proton at Loma Linda are from CA and a great many of these are not local CA.  Proton is now covered by about all major insurances and Medicare. 

Mike's Wife:

I hope you will at least check in from time to time to let us know how your husband is doing and his PSA numbers.  I sure there will always be someone looking for something besides surgery.  Take care and best wishes.

Dutch 

 

 


Diagnosed Feb 2001  (Age 65)  Currently 72
PSA 4.8      Gleason 3+3=6      Stage   T2b
Completed Proton Therapy @ Loma Linda - Aug 2001 - No side effects.
6yr PSA - 0.19
Our responsibility now is to educate men about Pca, PSA and the importance of early detection. 
 
 
 


pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 1/26/2008 9:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Ziggy
 
Thanks for making that important point, which I should have made.  Except for Loma Linda, whose proton treatment center is devoted largely to those with prostate cancer, the other proton centers treat many types of cancer and may limit the number of patients they will accept for PCa treatment.  At the present time, PCa patients have a greater probability of being accepted at Loma Linda. The center where I was treated (not Loma Linda) will only accept about 60-70 patients a year for prostate cancer, because they treat many other types of cancer.  They will only accept patients who are in an earlier stage of prostate cancer and have good prospects for eradicating their cancer.
 
Yes, it it true that some insurers may not pay for the substantially higher cost of proton treatment, which is unfortunate for those who would otherwise opt for this treatment.  Medicare will pay the full cost of proton treatment.
 
The eight-week period required for proton treatment is a small sacrific to make if one is covered by insurance and has the wherewithal to travel to a proton center.  However, some patients opt for an alternative treatment locally because it is quicker.  When one's life may be at stake with cancer, I don't understand such reasoning.
 
Dave
 


-69 years young!
-29 core biopsy 9/27/06 at age 68
-PSA 7.1, Stage T1c, Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in one area], Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two other areas], Negative DRE, bone scan and Endorectal MRI. 
-Completed 39 Proton radiation treatments 2/22/07-4/18/07.   
-PSA History: 7.1 pre-treatment; post treatment: 2.1 (3 mo.), 2.4 (6 mo.), 1.7 (9 mo). Radiation oncologist said the 3-mo. drop of 70% exceeded expectations and the slight 6-mo. movement upwards was not a cause for concern now.
-The following is a link to My Journey With Prostate Cancer -- Proton RadiationTherapy.  
 
 

Post Edited (pcdave) : 1/26/2008 9:28:36 PM (GMT-7)


pcdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 444
   Posted 1/26/2008 11:21 PM (GMT -7)   
Gordy said...
What the previous two posters have ignored is HDR brachy. I had 5 weeks of external beam and then HDR. Nothing is left in your body and I have had no urinary problems since my Tx in July and August 2005. And, although I've got other problems, my PSA is still undetectable.

-Les

Hi Les
 
I believe I am one of the posters that you are referring to in your message above!  I did not purposely ignore HDR brachy.  When I was researching for a treatment I was rather intriguied with HDR brachy because the seeds are not permanent.  It sounded like a very viable and less invasive type of PCa treatment. In fact, it was Andy Grove, the former CEO of Intel, who was treated somewhere in the state of Washington with HDR brachy many years ago and apparently it has been successful.  When I did my research, it appeared that HDR was not available at a great majority of PCa treatment centers and had largely been replaced by the seed implants which I was unwilling to undergo.  I never seemed to be able to get a definitive reason why HDR apparently fell by the wayside.  Perhaps the seed implants were deemed an easier and more effective treatment, but it appears that they have a greater potential risk of urinary side effects than HDR brachy. 
 
Dave
-69 years young!
-29 core biopsy 9/27/06 at age 68
-PSA 7.1, Stage T1c, Gleason 7 (3+4) [less than 20% in one area], Gleason 6 [less than 5% in two other areas], Negative DRE, bone scan and Endorectal MRI. 
-Completed 39 Proton radiation treatments 2/22/07-4/18/07.   
-PSA History: 7.1 pre-treatment; post treatment: 2.1 (3 mo.), 2.4 (6 mo.), 1.7 (9 mo). Radiation oncologist said the 3-mo. drop of 70% exceeded expectations and the slight 6-mo. movement upwards was not a cause for concern now.
-The following is a link to My Journey With Prostate Cancer -- Proton RadiationTherapy.  
 
 

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