Late diagnosis--- From Anger to Acceptance

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veteran1
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 133
   Posted 5/29/2007 2:47 PM (GMT -7)   
When the doctor first told me I had a diagnosis of prostate cancer, I went numb. Few questions. Foggy reaction. He went on to explain that my biopsy was a Gleason 10, a very aggressive cancer. He then handed me a document which essentially said, "Your PSA 2.29 on November, '04 and 4.6 on 5/20/05. (Doubling Time).
This meeting was on December of '06.After piecing together his explanition and some basic research of my own, I realized that this wasn't an early Christmas present; this was a late diagnosis.
What had I done to deserve this? Why didn't they catch it on May of '05? How could I tell my family. (late diagnosis).
After RRP surgery, EBRT, and hormone therapy (currently on CAB) cancer had taken control of my life.It's all I wanted to talk (gripe) about.I was driving myself and my family crazy.This had to stop. Cancer was winning the battle, and I didn't even care.
Slowly, with the help of family and friends and a good counselor, the tide began to turn. I was no longer defined by cancer. I was ready to take control and battle this tumor with all I had.
My attitude still needs an adjustment or two. This is a constant journey.
I hope we can travel this bumpy road together. Advice or comments welcome.
Thanks---Veteran
Current PSA: .03
Diagnosis: T3b Seminal vesicle involvement.
Gleason: 5+4=9 both lobes
Age: 54
Residence: Chicagoland area.
Just had PSA drawn today, May 29th.

biker90
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1463
   Posted 5/29/2007 3:40 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey Veteran,

Your reaction to the diagnosis was much like mine. My wife was with me and together we pieced together what was said in the meeting with the doc. Then we decided we would beat this thing only if we did it together. Soon thereafter I got a huge shot of adrenaline and got excited about the process. Like you said, it was all I could think about for the next month until the surgery was over. Then the long process of waiting for the lab results and PSA tests began. To me, thats the hardest part - the waiting.

We all react differently to the various stages of this disease and recovery. I find that only by sharing my thoughts and emotions with my wife, my family and you folks here on the forum am I able to handle all that has happened. Left to my own devices, I would not make it...

Jim
Age 72. Diagnosed 11/03/06. PSA 7.05. Stage T2B Gleason 3+3.
RRP 12/7/06. Nerves and nodes okay.
Pathological stage: T2B. Gleason 3+4. Cancer confined to prostate.
PSA on 1/3/07 - 0.04. 
PSA on 4/4/07 - 0.00  T level - 48  Restarted T therapy.
Next PSA on 7/18/07.
 
 "I have cancer but cancer does not have me."


jetguy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 741
   Posted 5/29/2007 4:03 PM (GMT -7)   

Sound about right, Vet.  Except than you've learned much quicker than I did.  Anger, frustration, dread, fear.  That's about right.  I suggest that you hang around here when you're in need.  It's a good place to be.  I, too let cancer control me and I thought of little else at first.  You have already moved beyond that to some degree.  Hang in there.  You are among friends and can say anything you need to.  Noone will think less of you.

Regards,

Bill


Gleason 3+3=6, T1c, one core in twelve, another pre-cancerous.
62 years old and good health.  Married 37 years.  To same woman!
Began IGRT January 23, 2007. 


kziz
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 5/29/2007 5:02 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Vet., Happy Memorial day, a day late. This is a process that is very difficult to go through. You sound like you are doing well with your last PSA. If you keep positive, and continue to BELIEVE that you CAN and WILL beat this thing, you are on the right path. When my dad was diagnosised, he was 49 and in the final stages. He was given 6 months to live. He read the book by Dr. Bernie Segal, "Peace, love and miracles", and it changed his life. You have to keep believing. That is the biggest part to this fight. I know that there will be times that you just need to vent. For my dad, it was with me, but for you, you have found the best place. When my husband was diagnosised at the age of 47, on the 10th aniversary of my dad's death, I needed to VENT!!!!! I was scared, but mostly MAD that this was happening to me again. I was the only one in my family that my dad ever vented to, not even my mom, and now here I was to face it again with my husband. And then I fell upon this site. What a wonderful group of people there is here. Feel free to keep talking/venting. ANd keep those numbers low! We are with you. Courtney
Kurt & Courtney
47 year old
Great Health prior to dx
Dx on 1/29/07
PSA 4.1
Gleason 3+3=6, both lobes
Stage T2c, I believe
Tumor involves 20% of cores, both lobes
Live in OK
Da Vinci scheduled 3-14-07 in Austin
Post-Op  Gleason 6, Stage t2c nx mx  YAAAAA HOOOOOO! 


myman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 1219
   Posted 5/29/2007 6:14 PM (GMT -7)   
Veteran 1,

So glad that you posted here. We're a group of people who came here out of fear, frustration and pain. Wow...doesn't sound like the most uplifting place to be, does it? But it is all that and more. I post, my husband does not...he handles pc in his own way...I come here.
You're definately not alone in this walk - we found out in late Nov. 05 and surgery was in Feb. 06. Nothing prepared us for neg. margins and a first post op PSA of 11.8. I'll never forget that feeling of total disbelief and denial. You can see his stats posted below. But what I really want to say is how he dealt/deals with this. He's living his life...not in some Pollyanna way but as it comes. He does have the side effects of HT but he gets through it. I admire and love him immensely because I see all of him - the good times and bad.
I don't know Veteran...I guess I just wanted to tell you it will be alright...we all discover what our "alrights" are in this journey. I wish you all the best on yours.

And we will be here for you.

Susan
Husband Diagnosed 11/17/05 Age: 63 No Symptoms
PSA: 7.96, Positive DRE
Biopsy Right: 6 of 6 Cores Positive Biopsy Left: 1 of 6 Cores Positive
Gleason: 4+3 = 7 Stage: T2B N0 MX
2/09/06: LRP Restage: T3A NX MX
3 mo. PSA Post Surgery: 11.8, 12.9, 13.9 Bone scan, CT scan, Endorectal MRI, Chest XR - neg.
9/06/06: 6 mo. PSA: 18.8 CT shows distant lymph node involvement
Restage IV Start HT Lupron 3 mo. shots
12/06/06: PSA 0.8
03/07/07 - PSA 0.3
06/06/07 - Next PSA


GreenAcres
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 474
   Posted 5/30/2007 5:16 AM (GMT -7)   
Wow, Veteran - you've triggered something in all of us!

The what if? (If we hadn't left city life, our doc would have enforced our 6-month PSA testing)
The "too late" - (If we hadn't been building a house, we might have not put off the annual physical)
The disease itself (In our ignorance, prostate cancer meant spending the rest of our lives with a dribbling, sexless old fool).

And like so many others here, the "hits just kept on coming" one bad number at a time right through the post-surgical path report.

That is why we're here at HealingWell - with so many great folks who know each emotion personally and in-depth.

In many ways it does, as Biker says, become a challenge - an event that takes weeks of planning, research, questions, shopping for doctors. Many different roads traveled - all for one horrid disease!

The ups, downs, and then the ups again. That's pretty much what it's all about.

We're glad you found us.
Husband age 66
PSA on 5/1/06: 4.2 (had doubled in 13 mos. and rising monthly)
DaVinci Surgery 8/2/06 - Austin, TX w/Dr. Randy F.A.G.I.N.
T2a (at biopsy)
At pathology - cancer cell leakage into fatty tissue
Post-Surgical PSA on 10/3/06 - undetectable!
Update: 11/1/06 - perhaps bladder neck involvement; 30%-50% chance of recurrence
Future: PSA tests twice-yearly for now - Next one: 4/17/07
 


Mike A
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 213
   Posted 5/30/2007 5:20 AM (GMT -7)   
Vet,
We all arrived here for a purpose. To give and receive advice and support! I think you've made the turn! In battling this darned disease, attitude is a major factor for all of us! Good luck with your PSA, it sounds to me like you're ready for the fight!
Mike
ps I second the Happy Veteran's Day!
June 2005 - Age 53 PSA 4.8 at regular physical
October 2005 - After several rounds of anti-biotics, PSA 5.2 at Urlogist
November 2005 - Biopsy negative
July 2006 - PSA 5.9 at regular Physical
October 2006 - After several more rounds of anti-biotics PSA 8.1
November 2006 - Second biopsy - Positive
December 2006 - Gleason (3+4=7), Tumor T1c, CT Scan and Bone Scan Negative
January 2, 2007 Robotic Prostatectomy, University of Rochester Medical Center - Tumor confined but larger than thought, only one nerve able to be spared. Margins clear.
February 2007 - Three to four pads a day, no erection with viagara.
March 2007 - Down to two pads a day, had first intercourse with Erecaid pump and bands, otherwise still flat tire.
April 2007 - First Post-Surgical PSA 0.02 and a great relief! Down to one pad a day. Still unable to achive erection without pump.
May, 2007 - Still one pad a day, even try a smaller pad on occasion. Slight improvement on the ED.
"If patience is a virtue, I feel like the most virtuous guy on the planet!"


hawkfan75
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 165
   Posted 5/30/2007 7:25 AM (GMT -7)   
Something to consider.  If you spent time in Viet Nam, you can apply for disability/compensation from the Veterans Association.  There have been others on this forum who have done this.  Even though my time over there was on a ship only a mile off shore, I now do qualify.  Prostate cancer is one of the Agent Orange caused diseases.  I applied for my benefits in February, and it's still in the works.  Check it out...

PSA 4.7 (up from 3.2 one year ago)
Biopsy November 8, 2006
1 of 10 cores positive 5% LEFT Side
2 others questionable (small gland proliferation)
Gleason 3+3
Robotic surgery January 19, 2007
Post Surgery Pathology
     Stage T3a, Gleason 3+4, positive margins and
     capsular penetration RIGHT Side
Post Surgery PSA:  March 5:  0.01


veteran1
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 133
   Posted 5/30/2007 9:03 AM (GMT -7)   
Thank you all for your advice, experience and concern. This is the place to be. And I
will "keep believing." This site is a very positive place to be.

Had some good news today. May 29th PSA
.01.
Thanks---Vet

Ken S
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 5/30/2007 9:34 AM (GMT -7)   
Vet,

Interesting topic. I too was numb when informed that I had PCa (also kidney cancer four months later) and had a pity party each time for about a week. I never thought "Why me?" because my next thought would have been "Why not me?". Also I never had any anger. I'm a realist and believe that life is just a series of random events and, as Bill Parsells would say, "It is was it is".

You're absolutely right about this cancer being all consuming. I also fear being defined by cancer but I think that will diminish when I'm finished with the radiation treatments and the "little guy" starts showing signs of life. Everyday life will take over.

For a while I considered going to a support group but this site, talking to a couple of people battling cancer and having very frank conversations with my wife has done wonders for my mental health.

Thanks to all for being there for me.

Ken S
PSA - 2005 - 3.2, 2006 - 3.7
Biopsy 8/06, Gleason 6 (3+3), T1c
Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy 11/3/06
Post-Op Biopsy, still Gleason 6 (3+3),
T2c, right apical margin positive
CT Scan 1/07, tumor discovered on right
kidney (unrelated to PCa)
Partial Nephrectomy 3/9/07
IMRT (37 Treatments) started 4/23/07


Izzyblizzy
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 411
   Posted 5/30/2007 9:50 AM (GMT -7)   
Vet ... Great news on the PSA!!! :-)
 
Congratulations!
Age: 63
Diagnosed: 10/30/06
PSA: 3.7 (2005: 3.4, 2004: 4.0)
Biopsy: 1/10 cancerous, 5% of one core, right apex.
Gleason: 3+3=6
Da Vinci: April 10, 2007, Denver CO
Path results: 1% of prostate involved. Very small tumors on both right and left apex. Negative margins, negative seminal vessicles, lymph nodes left intact. Gleason upgraded 3+4=7.
1st PSA Results: May 11, 2007 <.01
 


AEG
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2005
Total Posts : 154
   Posted 5/30/2007 10:08 AM (GMT -7)   

I've sorry to hear about your diagnosis.  I wanted to post an article by Dr. Fred Lee to give you hope that this disease can be controlled for many years to come. 

http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:GHnxYm2x0jsJ:www.rochesterurology.urologydomain.com/handler.cfm%3Fevent%3Dpractice,template%26cpid%3D34+dr.+fred+lee+prostate+cancer&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=10&gl=us

In 1983, Dr. Fred Lee was a successful radiologist, loving husband and father of five children. After watching a manufacturer's demonstration of an experimental transrectal ultrasound machine, he scheduled a demonstration test on himself. At that time, transrectal ultrasound was so new that no one was able to read the images. However, the salesperson commented that Dr. Lee's images looked different from what was normally seen. This lead to the discovery that Dr. Lee had prostate cancer.

X-ray tests did not reveal evidence of cancer spread and Dr. Lee was hopeful of a cure using radioactive seed implant. At that time the procedure was performed by making an abdominal incision. Following a pelvic lymph node dissection radioactive seeds were inserted directly into the prostate. However, several days later Dr. Lee discovered that his lymph nodes which on frozen section were negative were found to contain metastatic prostate cancer. Because of the positive lymph nodes, Dr. Lee underwent an additional course of external beam irradiation to the whole pelvic region with his prostate shielded. Additionally, he stated taking Emcyt which he continues to take to this very day. Emcyt is a combination drug consisting of estrogen and nitrogen mustard. Unfortunately in 1986 repeat biopsy confirmed persistence of his prostate cancer. He receive and additional course of external beam to just his prostate and well four courses of hyperthermia. When Dr. Lee was rebiopsied in 1989, 1995 and 1996 no evidence of cancer could be found and his PSA remains extremely low.

With the knowledge that only 50% of men with his stage of disease live 5 years and only 10% live 10 years, Dr. Lee decided to dedicate the time he had left to optimize the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. As the saying goes, "The rest is history." Dr. Lee defined what prostate cancer looked like on transrectal ultrasound his work has lead to its widespread acceptance as the preferred method of diagnosing prostate cancer. He was the co-chairman of the American Cancer Societies National Prostate Cancer Detection Project, a multi-institutional study involving over 2000 men. He has written or co-authored over 75 publications, has been visiting professor at numerous institutions, has made countless presentations. Currently, Dr. Lee is the Director of the Crittenton Hospital Prostate Cancer Center in Rochester Hills, Michigan. Since his arrival almost 700 cryoablative procedures have been performed at Crittenton Hospital.

Dr. Badalament: Fred, tell us how you are doing and relate to us your experience with prostate cancer and how it has changed your approach to life?

Dr. Lee: I'm doing fine. I've been taking Emcyt for a long period of time; it's certainly caused a lot of changes in me. By taking estrogens your serum testosterone hits an all time low and I was depressed about the fact that I lost my libido. Not entirely because I had a very wonderful relationship with a very understanding wife. My potency lasted for many years in spite of the fact I had a lot of treatment to my prostate. Eventually the loss of my libido really became something that was not that important to myself and my great wife.

Gandhi said that he could never accomplish what he wanted to unless he could channel the energy of his libido or sex drive. It's great and good because it preserves the race, however, if you have already had the children you wanted what does one do with that energy. You can see if the energy goes the wrong way even when dealing with a person with high ethical or moral standards that this drive is so powerful that even the President of the United States could not control that energy.

Gandhi stated that if he could take that energy and direct it in the proper way he could liberate India. And I felt in some way the treatment of my prostate cancer liberated me from my libido. I had this energy that was mine to be used in any way that I wanted. But first before I could use this energy I had to get over the shock of knowing that here you were, an individual that had a recognition of the self and now that self was so threatened that now it was finite.

I had this sense that I did not accomplish what I wanted in life. Prostate cancer was in my lymph nodes but in the last stages it spreads to the bones. Since it wasn't in my bones, I felt like at least I had some time left. Why was I granted this? All my life I felt like there was something else I should do; I just wasn't satisfied with how things came out in my life. I was a good radiologist and I raised a good family but it didn't seem real.

I participated in a one week retreat with Elizabeth Kubler-Ross (author of "On Death and Dying") and 99 other people; all with a personal problem that was going to lead to our premature demise. During that retreat each of us gave up our egos. We could say in an open sort of way what bothered us. We were supportive. That conference was my first understanding of the essence of what life is. From that time on I decided to devote my remaining days to just working in this whole area of prostate cancer so that we can diagnose it earlier that we were.

A lot of serendipitous things happened along the way. It would happen during periods of contemplation. I would go on long walks and try to absorb nature in a very relaxed way. I said to myself, "Your time is limited on earth, see everything you can just absorb it." During that time nothing would interfere with thoughts that came into you and you could let them free roam in your mind. Things began to fit into place.

Dr. McNeal, a pathologist, wrote about the location of prostate cancer in relationship to what we now call the outer gland . It made a big impact on me. He noted that all these cancers were located on the outside of the prostate and prostate capsule. I knew all the other organs of the body, the kidney, the liver, the breast, and ovaries that every single lesion is dark on ultrasound because cancer are packed together in a relatively solid mass as compared to the background. I felt that if on ultrasound we found something that is dark sitting on the outside of the prostate or on the prostate capsule then that area could be cancer.

One day a Urologic colleague told me about had a patient with a prostate nodule that had a negative finger guided transperineal biopsy. I said to him, "Lets look at him under ultrasound." So that is what we did and we noticed a dark area on the back of the gland. I biopsied the dark area, and guess what, he had prostate cancer. So I knew after my first transrectal ultrasound biopsy that we were on to something.

In the meantime, while in Buffalo visiting my mother over a Thanksgiving weekend, I decided to see Dr. Gerald Murphy for a second opinion on my own cancer. At that time was the chief urologist at Roswell Park Cancer Center. After we talked about my cancer and I started to tell him about my work on transrectal prostatic ultrasound. I showed him ultrasound images of my patients. Dr. Murphy had an interest in transrectal ultrasound and was also instrumental in the development of PSA. He invited me to be followed by PSA and ultrasound. And by the way, Dr. Murhpy said, "Lets have a conference on prostate ultrasound in July". He said that he would invite everyone who is working on prostate cancer at that time. "And you Fred can present you work on how you recognize cancer on transrectal ultrasound."

I began performing ultrasound on radical prostatectomy specimens that were place in a water bath. I then mapped out where the tumor was on ultrasound and compared it to the pathologists findings. We studied about 10 radical prostatectomy specimens and were right on every one of them. We made glass slides of whole mounts (the entire prostate gland) and slides of corresponding ultrasound images. We took these to the conference and changed the minds of the so called experts. When I gave my talk I told the audience that prostate cancer on ultrasound was not a white lesion like most people believed but a dark lesion. The very next doctor had a presentation intended to demonstrate that transrectal ultrasound did not work. He would show a transrectal ultrasound slide and ask me to point out the cancer. Here is the cancer in this dark area", I would say. Sure enough when he showed the next slide which was the pathology slide, I had correctly identified the tumor. That speaker was Dr. Tom Stamey, Chairman of Urology at Stanford University, who shortly thereafter visited me to learn how to read transrectal ultrasound images.

When we got the biopsy gun from Denmark to do transrectal biopsy we knew we could diagnose early cancer. This was a great advantage over doing biopsies through the perineum (the space between the anus and scrotum). On February 15, 1987 our paper was published in Cancer and we were flooded by urologists visiting us to learn how to perform transrectal ultrasound. We put on our first transrectal ultrasound for prostate cancer conference in Detroit later that year and over 800 people showed up. For many years we game an annual conference.

The next hurdle we had to fight was the acceptance of combination hormonal therapy as an adjuvant treatment prior to definitive therapy. That is where Lloyd Ney came in. Our treatment options for prostate cancer are not as good as we think so we should try to weaken the cancer before you use definitive therapy. This is very controversial and is an area I'm working on when I'm not at the hospital. I am studying two groups treated by radical surgery. One had preoperative combination hormonal therapy the other didn't. At 6 years the group treated with combination hormonal therapy is two times better off than the non-treated group using PSA as the biologic marker.

In 1987 we got very interested in the seed implantation program. I was involved in two studies one with radioactive iodine and the other with radioactive iridium plus hyperthermia, however, our results were disappointing. We also noticed that a substantial number of patients treated with external beam irradiation had a disappointing positive post treatment biopsy rate. Radical surgery was difficult on our patients because of side effects. As a result I then moved to investing cryotherapy. Since I came to Crittenton, we have treated nearly 700 patients with cryoablation. At 5 years, 81% of our T1 and T2 patients and 71% of our T3 and T4 are free of disease.

The prostate cancer patients should know that this disease is not the end of the world. I've been down that path and I will help them along that path. And I will get help from a urologist to be a team to help them. We will explain objectively to them what they have so we can help them decide in a very learned was how we would approach their problem. But, eventually it's their responsibility and we want them to know what the facts are. The vagaries of prostate cancer are not small. I use myself as an example and I should have been gone a long time ago.

Big hug to you and I wish you a very speedy recovery.

AEG

 


kziz
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 5/30/2007 10:22 AM (GMT -7)   
vet, CONGRATS on the PSA. Courtney
Kurt & Courtney
47 year old
Great Health prior to dx
Dx on 1/29/07
PSA 4.1
Gleason 3+3=6, both lobes
Stage T2c, I believe
Tumor involves 20% of cores, both lobes
Live in OK
Da Vinci scheduled 3-14-07 in Austin
Post-Op  Gleason 6, Stage t2c nx mx  YAAAAA HOOOOOO! 


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 5/30/2007 10:25 AM (GMT -7)   
AEG,

You found a wonderful article interviewing Fred Lee! He is a pioneer and from what I have seen of him around the hospitals (Critt and Providence), he seems quite a nice man. Don't lose this post. It's an inspiration with real human touch. Thanks for finding it.

Swim
 


myman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 1219
   Posted 5/30/2007 4:13 PM (GMT -7)   
Vet -

Great news on the PSA...that news sure can turn a day around fast now, can't it?!

Susan

bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 5/30/2007 5:46 PM (GMT -7)   

 Yea !  ~   Vet,

 

1st…..PSA…   !!!~~~~>>>  Woo~Hoo  <<<~~~~!!!  undetectable

 

Cause  for   celebration!!!!!

     What a wonderful day it is ~ each and every-day….

          Enjoy it to the fullest ~ friend.

 

Yippeeeee!!!!!! From  Lee & Buddy

 

*     *     *     *     *     *

The ultimate “goal”… we all strive for… Thank you for sharing ~ that your goal has been met….

It is very important to “all ”of us!  This is a way of positive feedback…

A way of showing others Hope… and a way of Sharing.  

J  Caring is Sharing ~  Thank You for Sharing  J

 

 

Threads Started by: Veteran1

 

(Direct Link ~ just click on the title below and a new window will open!  

Reminder … click on the REFRESH icon once you get there)

Late diagnosis--- From Anger to Acceptance

How long are hormone shots effective?


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 6/10/2007 9:28 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi ~ Vet1,

 

Just wanted to let you know you’re in our thoughts and prayers

     as you continue to move forward…

               True Freedom comes from small steps forward  ~

                                                                               Every step counts.

In Friendship ~ Lee & Buddy


myman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 1219
   Posted 6/11/2007 3:15 PM (GMT -7)   
AEG - thanks for posting that article - I re-read it and it's powerful...that's what we need - POWER!

Vet1 - Bless you!

Susan
Husband Diagnosed 11/17/05 Age: 63 No Symptoms
PSA: 7.96, Positive DRE
Biopsy Right: 6 of 6 Cores Positive Biopsy Left: 1 of 6 Cores Positive
Gleason: 4+3 = 7 Stage: T2B N0 MX
2/09/06: LRP Restage: T3A NX MX
3 mo. PSA Post Surgery: 11.8, 12.9, 13.9 Bone scan, CT scan, Endorectal MRI, Chest XR - neg.
9/06/06: 6 mo. PSA: 18.8 CT shows distant lymph node involvement
Restage IV Start HT Lupron 3 mo. shots
12/06/06: PSA 0.8
03/07/07 - PSA 0.3
06/06/07 - 0.1

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