The missing 80%

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

damo123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 714
   Posted 4/19/2008 1:59 PM (GMT -6)   
80% of people with the potential to have UC, never get the condition triggered.
 
The obvious question is to then say that certain factors must increases the risk of trigger (not talking about the risk of having the gene - that's different).
 
But unless I've missed something this isn't true.
 
80% of all males and 80% of all females don't have their UC condition - > not sex related
80% of people living in "hot" climates and 80% of all people living in "cold" climates don't have their UC triggered -> not climate related
etc
 
In fact I've yet to read about a particular risk categoery that statisitcially is more likely to induce the disease. (Remember issues about Jewish ancestory etc refer to the potential to have the gene, not the trigger. There is still 80% of such people who don't have UC even though they have the potential)
 
So my proposition is this...that UC as we understand it today is not a condition, rather it is a collection of symptoms. In fact it is being treated as such by "modern" medicine. (the word modern being used here in the loosest possible sense!).
 
Last estimate gives 1,543 medical reasons for a person to have a headache. I wonder is UC similar in this repsect i.e. UC as we know it is a symptom not the underlying condition. This would go along way to explaining why people with UC have such varying symptoms.
 
But that's just a though, only a thought.
 
D

Asacol and Iron as Needed. <I've fallen back into unhealthy ways and really enjoying it, burb!>
 
"Whatever you do in life don't berate yourself too much nor contragulate yourself too much. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody elses'"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


GardenerJames
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 616
   Posted 4/19/2008 2:26 PM (GMT -6)   
I think that's a good point. Perhaps UC should be defined by the symptoms only. I have always thought that there are several different causes that different people have. Which is why some people respond to antibiotics, antifungal therapies, regular medications or biologics.
I tried diet, meds but only biologics have made a difference for me. Whereas others have had success with the other methods. So I conclude that the TNF part of my immune system is overactive and that's why a tnf inhibitor gives me remission.
James
Asacol 4 tabs 2x daily www.myspace.com/gardenerjames
Forvia once a day - Probiotic twice daily - Methotrexate 3 pills once a week - Actonel once a week
Calcium supp. - 1 mg Folic Acid daily - Omega-3 once daily
13th Remicade infusion End of April


jujub
Elite Member


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10407
   Posted 4/19/2008 3:08 PM (GMT -6)   
My thinking runs along these lines too. UC seems like more of a syndrome (the medical term for a group of symptoms commonly occurring together) than an single disease. It's just too different in it's minor aspects (food tolerances, response to meds, triggers for flares) in different people. While there probably aren't 1500 causes, I've long suspected there may be as many as 5 to 20.
Judy
 
Moderate to severe left-sided UC (21 cm) diagnosed 2001.
Asacol, Rowasa, Pentasa, Prednisone, Entocort, Azathioprine
Colazal,  Remicade, Nature's Way Primadophilus Reuteri. In remission since April, 2006.
 
Co-Moderator UC Forum
The information I share on this forum is based only on my own experience and study. It is important to consult your health care provider when making health-related decisions.


GISGuy31
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 79
   Posted 4/19/2008 3:53 PM (GMT -6)   
You can apply that thinking to all other diseases as well. It's just weird that one day your immune system gets faked out and starts to attack an organ. Who knows what other ticking time bombs we have in our bodies ready to go off.
Age 0 to 30 - 100% healthy, no meds, no doctor visits, no hospital stays
Oct. 2006 - Symptoms of UC began
3/5/2007 - Diagnosed with UC - Pancolitis (entire colon involved)
20mg-40mg/day Prednisone, 4.8 g/day Asacol - didn't work at all
10/12/2007 - Steroid Induced Osteoporosis from Prednisone and Anemic
add Actonel (75mgx2 pills/month) and daily Iron Pills
2/12/2008 - open Subtotal Colectomy with Temporary Ileostomy Surgery
Off all meds except Actonel and feel normal again
Aug. 2008 - J-Pouch Surgery and possible Ileo Reversal Surgery Scheduled
"When life gives you lemons...make lemonade"


damo123
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 714
   Posted 4/19/2008 4:49 PM (GMT -6)   
I can't see how such an argument can be applied to most "standard" diseases where a cause and effect relationship exists. But no such cause - effect exsits for UC.
Asacol and Iron as Needed. <I've fallen back into unhealthy ways and really enjoying it, burb!>
 
"Whatever you do in life don't berate yourself too much nor contragulate yourself too much. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody elses'"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


jujub
Elite Member


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10407
   Posted 4/19/2008 5:09 PM (GMT -6)   
I also sort of regard "autoimmune disease" as being one giant thing that manifests in some as MS, some as Crohns, some as UC, some as thyroid abnormalities, some as diabetes, etc. My AD attacked my thyroid first, then my joints, now my colon.
Judy
 
Moderate to severe left-sided UC (21 cm) diagnosed 2001.
Asacol, Rowasa, Pentasa, Prednisone, Entocort, Azathioprine
Colazal,  Remicade, Nature's Way Primadophilus Reuteri. In remission since April, 2006.
 
Co-Moderator UC Forum
The information I share on this forum is based only on my own experience and study. It is important to consult your health care provider when making health-related decisions.


trumpington
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2008
Total Posts : 9
   Posted 4/19/2008 5:33 PM (GMT -6)   
I've long found this an interesting way of thinking about UC. After all, there is some genetic susceptibility, an initial trigger, and a vast lot of possible environmental or developmental factors. How do all of these interact to produce the symptoms to which we refer as ulcerative colitis? How much does the organic pathology of UC differ between individual sufferers? Calling it a "syndrome" like Judilyn or a even a spectrum (in the same sense as "autistic spectrum disorder") rather than a specific disease might be more accurate. I strongly suspect that improvements in treatment will come not from new wonder drugs which are great for everyone, but from improved diagnostics which provide a more specific description of what an individual is experiencing (type XXIII ulcerative colitis, maybe!) - and who then can be treated by very specific agents (agents which may only work for a very small proportion of UD patients, but give this small proportion significant relief). Unfortunately this is both a form of medicine with a small target population - hence not well funded by drug company research - and expensive. Still, there does seem to be recent progress in identifying some of the biochemistry of UC, so I expect we'll start seeing more drugs like Remicade, though perhaps which will only be used after genetic or other testing to determine if the patient is in the correct target group, in the not-too-distant future.

Craig
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Thursday, August 16, 2018 10:30 AM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,993,263 posts in 328,031 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 161223 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, jkristylm.
288 Guest(s), 10 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
tennis23, borrelioburgdorferii, jkristylm, Kent M., Ak123, Depov, FLBeachgal, cppoly, xy123, Buddy Blank