Is it possible to quit smoking?

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symods.jem
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 2/25/2009 10:44 AM (GMT -6)   
How do you encourage a person to quit smoking that has been smoking since the age of 16?

Red_34
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23551
   Posted 2/25/2009 10:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Curious...does this person have Uc?


 @--->--SHERRY--<---@
Moderator for Allergies/Asthma and Co-moderator for UC
~Left sided Uc-'92-Colazal(9 daily),6mp(50-100mgs),Bentyl, Prilosec,Biotin,Forvia,Pro-Bio**Unable to tolerate Asacol, Rowasa or Canasa**~Year-round allergies-Singulair, Zyrtec~Secondary Reynauds Syndrome-'04-Norvasc~Sacroiliitis-epidural injections~bulging and herniated discs C5/C6 & C6/C7~3 epidural injections-second series starts 2/17, OA in my fingers -Celebrex, Tylonel Arthritis and Voltaren Gel
To help Healingwell - click here: DONATE
 
 
 
 

 
 


WishfulMA
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 197
   Posted 2/25/2009 12:14 PM (GMT -6)   
I quit after smoking for 15 years. This June will be 2 years for me. I used chantix! It was a miracle. My husband used it too and as of 2/19 is a year smoke free.
severe ulcerative proctitis - march 05 diagnosed
proctosigmoiditis - january 09 diagnosed
hospitalized - 3/08 for 6 days of IV steriods
hospitalized - 1/09 for 5 days of IV steriods / put on 6MP
past meds: colozol, sulfasalzine, hydrocortisone enemas, canasa, rowasa and prednisone 
current meds: 6MP (75mgs), Asacol 12 pills,  Rowasa Enema, Primal Defense Ultra Probiotic, fish oil, calcium w/ vitamin d 2x a day, prenatal vitamin & extra vitamin c and b12.
 
 


nucid
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 2/25/2009 3:38 PM (GMT -6)   
I started smoking at the age of 13. I quit cold turkey at 22. I spent the whole summer back packing. I new I couldn't trust myself for long. I still had the urge to smoke for a long time and would often dream about it. Now I have been smoke free for over 10 years. Never give up on quitting that's my advice. Many things take a lot of tries before you succeed. And stack the deck in your favor as much as you can.
Female 33 Married
diagnosed January 2009
mild pancolitis
Sulfasalazine 500mg 3X

"The Lord is my Shepherd"


Scarlet504
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 192
   Posted 2/25/2009 3:59 PM (GMT -6)   

I quit cold turkey two years ago and I was a smoker for more or less 18 years.

So how to encourage a person to quit smoking? Well, there's reason ... there's tough love, too cool . What encouraged me to quit (and heck, I tried to quit a million times!) is the fact that smoking will sooner or later be very bad for you (right, it IS bad when you smoke, but I mean the longterm damages from it). May it be emphysema or lung cancer or stroke or heart attack or other forms of cancer and not to forget the costs of smoke, everything stinks of it, you have yellow teeth, you age faster, your skin is all gray and unhealthy-looking and you can't go on long-distance flights without craving that makes you want to have a smoke as big as your thigh.

To resume smoking to "aid" my UC was a big factor why I failed to quit so many times, but in the end I am more scared of lung damage/cancer than the UC.

Hope it helps.


Scarlett, 38 yo., TX
Pancolitis since 3/1997
Meds
6 x Asacol a day
75 50 mg 6-MP
Align (probiotic)
Flintstones Complete Vitamins


saskia
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2007
Total Posts : 31
   Posted 2/25/2009 4:11 PM (GMT -6)   

I don't know about encouraging someone else but here is what worked for me (I have not smoked in almost ten years):  1) being mentally ready to stop.  It took me a few years of telling myself it was time to think about quitting smoking before I did it. It was a long process of getting psyched up for it.  2) picking a day to stop.  Obviously, you don't want to pick a date during a time that you know will be stressful.  I picked March 6 simply because I dreamt one night that I quit on March 6. It was an ordinary weekday.  It was a random choice.  3) taking one day, one hour, one minute at a time.  For a long, long time, I simply told myself and others that "I am not smoking right now".  At the time, it was too daunting for me to say that I had quit smoking.  4) Use a stop smoking aid.  I used nicorette gum because it comes closest to mimicking smoking (put something in the mouth, getting a bit of a hit of nicotine, chewing the gum for about 10 minutes and then discarding it).  However, I did not adhere to the instructions and use it for only 3 months.  I tapered much more gradually and used the gum for about 18 months or so.  Mind you, towards the end of that period, I was using about one-half a piece once or twice a day. 5) Finding other ways to reward yourself about finishing a tough job, having an difficult or emotional conversation or whatever triggers your feeling of entitlement to a cigarette as a reward.  I ended up buying myself flowers with some of the money I was saving from not smoking.  6) Understand that you will feel at a loss at first in certain situations (e.g. having a drink, writing, balancing your checkbook, having a coffee,etc.) You will find yourself reaching for where you kept your cigarettes and then be dismayed to find there are none there.  Be aware of this and try to talk yourself out of panicking.  This reaction is part of the habit of smoking.  Just tell yourself that the cigarettes aren't there because you are not smoking right now, you don't need really need to smoke now.  7) I had to keep a new, unopened package of cigarettes in my office and at home just so that I could tell myself that if things got too bad, I had access to cigarettes. This may not work for all, but I needed to do this to given myself permission to fail and then to try stopping again.  What ended up happening was that I did not think I had not encountered a situation that made me want to give up what I had accomplished by not smoking.  This feeling grew stronger as time went on.  I eventually started to enjoy feeling liberated from cigarettes; the need to go outside in all kinds of lousy weather, being anxious that I would be a few minutes late for something because I had to stop to have a cigarette and so on.  I still have the unopened pack of cigarettes in my office.  A friend broke into my pack at home and took it with him.  Stopping smoking is not an event so much as a process.  Best wishes.


*saskia*
pan colitis (diag: Nov 05)
Meds: salofalk7 to 10 tabs/day depending on disease status; imuran 75mg/day; entocort when flaring; cortifoam when flaring; pantoloc; VSL#3; vitamin D and calcium; fosomax


Kiss520
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 742
   Posted 2/25/2009 6:16 PM (GMT -6)   
It is impossible to encourage someone to quit smoking. They have to want to do it for themselves. My own mother wouldn't quit for me when I used to beg her to, and she didn't even quit when my son was born (even though my mother-in-law did). And my mother is the most considerate and loving person I know. It was only when her brother had a heart attack in his 40's and she concurrently learned that she had very high cholesterol that she actually did quit. Sometimes it takes a good slap in the face like that to make someone do it.

I wish I could be more positive, because I totally understand your frustration with wanting this person to stop. Nothing upset me more than watching my mom blantantly disregard her health for years. I hope your loved one finds the inspiration to quit. As for your part, it doesn't hurt to give as much information as you can about the negative effects of smoking as well as helpful information on how to quit (books, programs, etc.). Good luck!
DX:  Pancolitis as of 9/08 (Proctitis as of 1/08) and IBS
Current Treament:  Spinach/Sunflower Seed Diet
Previous Treatment:  Canasa suppositories, Cortifoam, Prednisone, Colazal, Symex DuoTabs, Rowasa, Bentyl, Cortenema, Asacol, Iron, Zoloft, Acidophilus.
Status:  Remission
 
 
 
 


beartooth
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 517
   Posted 2/26/2009 4:47 AM (GMT -6)   
I was a smoker for over 13 years myself. i tried quitting many times, but no matter how long I was able to stay off the cancer sticks, I'd always go back. I was doing a lot of hiking/climbing then and one day I was chugging up a mountain when I noticed that it was hard to breathe. Not sure why this was a light bulb moment, but I realized that the cigarettes really were making it hard for me to breathe. I decided I wanted to be able to climb more than I wanted to smoke so I gave up the cigarettes. I used the patch for a while, but the constant nicotine flow felt weird so I didn't use them long. I haven't smoke in over 6 years now.

Good luck. Cigarettes are one tough habit to break, but when you are ready in your mind, you'll be able to do it.
 
36 y.o. male
Diagnosed w/ UC in May '06, had symptoms since '99
Meds & supplements: VSL#3, Lialda, Allegra, multi-vitamin, buproprion, fluoxetine, and vit E, D, zinc.
Started LDN: 1.5mg for now


Red_34
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23551
   Posted 2/26/2009 6:20 AM (GMT -6)   
That's what I thought. What we have here my fellow members is a sneaky spammer. This person has hit the Allergies/Asthma forum with the same odd question followed with a post with a link. That is why I asked whether or not this person had UC.
 @--->--SHERRY--<---@
Moderator for Allergies/Asthma and Co-moderator for UC
~Left sided Uc-'92-Colazal(9 daily),6mp(50-100mgs),Bentyl, Prilosec,Biotin,Forvia,Pro-Bio**Unable to tolerate Asacol, Rowasa or Canasa**~Year-round allergies-Singulair, Zyrtec~Secondary Reynauds Syndrome-'04-Norvasc~Sacroiliitis-epidural injections~bulging and herniated discs C5/C6 & C6/C7~3 epidural injections-second series starts 2/17, OA in my fingers -Celebrex, Tylonel Arthritis and Voltaren Gel
To help Healingwell - click here: DONATE
 
 
 
 

 
 


Belly Ache
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 9
   Posted 2/26/2009 8:21 AM (GMT -6)   
sneaky spammer?? What do you mean?

Red_34
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23551
   Posted 2/26/2009 8:50 AM (GMT -6)   
A spammer is someone who comes to sites like these and tries to get you to go to their site in order for you to purchase something or sign up for something. A sneaky spammer is someone who does this but in a round about manner. In essense trying to go under the "radar". This person will post a question (this time about smoking cessation) then create another account to pawn off their website. This is their way of trying to be sneaky but what they don't seem to realize that HW has a ZERO tolerance rule about spammers and mods are trained to know which is which.
 @--->--SHERRY--<---@
Moderator for Allergies/Asthma and Co-moderator for UC
~Left sided Uc-'92-Colazal(9 daily),6mp(50-100mgs),Bentyl, Prilosec,Biotin,Forvia,Pro-Bio**Unable to tolerate Asacol, Rowasa or Canasa**~Year-round allergies-Singulair, Zyrtec~Secondary Reynauds Syndrome-'04-Norvasc~Sacroiliitis-epidural injections~bulging and herniated discs C5/C6 & C6/C7~3 epidural injections-second series starts 2/17, OA in my fingers -Celebrex, Tylonel Arthritis and Voltaren Gel
To help Healingwell - click here: DONATE
 
 
 
 

 
 

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