what are the chances your children will have UC

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cyn555
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Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 307
   Posted 3/21/2009 7:31 AM (GMT -6)   
i was wondering if i decide to have children what are the chances of them having UC?
 
- 23 year old female, Gatineau, Quebec
 -diagnosed with UC june 2007 panacolitis
- Asacol (6 daily)800mg
- Salofalk (1 at bedtime) 1000mg


AMK77
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Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 678
   Posted 3/21/2009 7:38 AM (GMT -6)   
My GI said that if one parent has IBD, the chances are 15%, if both parents have IBD 50%.
31 yr old female currently breastfeeding
Diagnosed 2/29/08 with Mild Universal UC
I've had UC since 2000 but was in remission for most of those 8 years med free
Lialda Colazal & Asacol made symptoms worse, MUCH worse
Not taking any meds for now. May be on 6mp soon?


Sweetie31105
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Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 903
   Posted 3/21/2009 8:26 AM (GMT -6)   
I don't know what the chances are for your children getting it, but I got mine from my Dad, so when I have kids they are going to be tested if there is a way of testing.
27 year old, Married, Female.
Diagnosed with UC since March 2007

Taking Humira and Imuran since May 2007 (Currently in remission since May 2007)
Taken off Imuran 1/15/09
Only taking Humira.

Can't take Asacol, Allergic to Remicade


subdued
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 3/21/2009 10:01 AM (GMT -6)   
The probability of my kids getting Colitis is practically zero.

The statistics are just averages. They don't show the difference between those families who are prone to getting Colitis and those who aren't.

My family members all have very strong colons. I have Colitis due to the constant abuse I had put on my colon. I was on antibiotics for most my life and I was a chocoholic and HFCS-oholic for two years. I ate nothing but chocolate and drank nothing but high-fructose corn syrup milk teas. It was my way of coping with my divorce without resorting to alcohol and cigarettes.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Diagnosed w/ UC Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


basa0806
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Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 2103
   Posted 3/21/2009 11:24 AM (GMT -6)   
I don't think its really that simple. There are a lot of factors that go into what genes you get and how genes are expressed and interact with others. Also they think that there are environmental factors that cause UC along with genetic and its hard to know for sure how your UC came about. Like subdued said stats are just averages.
Sam(antha)
20 year old medical technology/biology student
Remission since January/April 2006
4 400mg Asacol 2x daily, 10mg Elavil, 75mg Effexor XR for GAD, ortho lo

"Life is what happens when you are busy making other plans"
John Lennon


pb4
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Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/21/2009 12:23 PM (GMT -6)   
According to research it's estimated that if one parent has an IBD (either CD or UC) their offspring have a -10 to -15 fold increased risk of also developing an IBD...my mom has UC and I have crohn's, BUT, my mom got sick with her UC AFTER I got sick with my CD, she was in her mid 60's and I was in my 20's when I got sick, however, none of my other siblings have either....yet, doesn't mean they're completely out of the woods...remember part of the disease is it being triggered, who knows how many are walking around all healthy yet to get hit with either CD or UC.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Eva Lou
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Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 3442
   Posted 3/21/2009 12:33 PM (GMT -6)   
I don't think it's all that likely that a child will develop IBD if one parent has it. And even so, is it SO bad that you wouldn't want to have a kid, on the off chance that they may develop UC? Know what I mean? It's like, would you rather not be alive than be alive with UC? Funny enough, a lot of women seem to develop UC post-childbirth. My symptoms started when my daughter was about 3 months old, & just got worse from there. During pregnancy, your immune system is naturally suppressed to avoid rejecting the fetus- & after childbirth, it sorts of kicks back in with a vengeance. Many autoimmune disorders flare-up post-childbirth. I had an overactive thyroid for years, & it finally settled down, but after childbirth it was crazy overactive, to the point that my endocrinologist started talking surgery! Then it just settled down, I take no meds or anything, & it's been fine since. So the theory is that if in fact UC/IBD is auto-immune, that surge in immune system activity post-childbirth can trigger it. And conversely, during pregnancy, most UC sufferers go into near-total remission. That alone supports the auto-immune theory enbough for me to believe it!

diagnosed with UC '02
meds-
Asacol- 8 tabs/day
Remicade-10mgs/kg- since 4/07
Imuran- 150mgs/day
various probiotics
Fiber supplement
 
 
 


pb4
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Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/21/2009 1:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Yes, but the autoimmune factor doesn't rule out specific genes that are found in CDers and UCers (which happen to be a little different from one another) not to mention what researchers have learned about certain bacteria (or lack of as well as overgrowth of) related to IBD as well.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Kiss520
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Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 742
   Posted 3/21/2009 1:40 PM (GMT -6)   

pb4 - It's interesting that you bring up the order in which you and your mom got your diseases.  I was diagnosed over a year ago, and now suddenly my mom is having some digestion issues.  She also recently quit smoking, so I'm saying many prayers that she's not developing something like UC.

EvaLou - I, too, developed my problems shortly after childbirth.  I think my son was 1 1/2 when I first saw symptoms.  I think childbirth totally screws up your body's chemistry.  I'm just glad I never had to make any decisions about childbirth, since I got UC afterwards.  I totally agree with what you're saying about having a life with UC that's still worth living, but I just read another mother's post about the pain of administering rectal meds to her 10-year-old daughter and it absolutely broke my heart.  I'm always so grateful that I developed UC AFTER my childhood, dating/partying years, etc. 


DX:  Pancolitis as of 9/08 (Proctitis as of 1/08) and IBS
Status:  Remission
What Worked:  Spinach/Sunflower Seed Diet & IBS Diet (www.helpforibs.com)
What Didn't Work:  Canasa suppositories, Cortifoam, Prednisone, Colazal, Symex DuoTabs, Rowasa, Bentyl, Cortenema, Asacol, Iron, Zoloft, Acidophilus.
 
 
 
 
 


pb4
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Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/21/2009 2:02 PM (GMT -6)   
kiss520- yes it is interesting but it proves that our trigger(s) play a role in that part of the disease, hers obviously wasn't triggered until after mine was and I wasn't living at home at the time of my DX, I already had my first child who was a yr and a half old when I got sick...thing is people always assume that their IBD isn't herditary because they are the only ones in their family that have the disease and that clearly is not always the case since those that make that claim obviously don't realize that it doesn't mean other family members don't also have the disease, just that theirs hasn't been triggered yet.

I hope your mom isn't developing an IBD and I hope neither of my 2 kids don't get it either.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Kiss520
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Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 742
   Posted 3/21/2009 2:13 PM (GMT -6)   
pb4 - Yep, even though there is some argument over UC being an autoimmune disease, I really think that it is and that it must be genetic. Although no one in my family but me has UC, my dad and my grandma (mom's side) both have IBS and/or other digestion issues. Maybe they're carriers who haven't shown real symptoms. Who knows. I suppose there's no point in trying to figure this one out. Once you've got it, there's nothing you can do about it anyway. :-(
DX:  Pancolitis as of 9/08 (Proctitis as of 1/08) and IBS
Status:  Remission
What Worked:  Spinach/Sunflower Seed Diet & IBS Diet (www.helpforibs.com)
What Didn't Work:  Canasa suppositories, Cortifoam, Prednisone, Colazal, Symex DuoTabs, Rowasa, Bentyl, Cortenema, Asacol, Iron, Zoloft, Acidophilus.
 
 
 
 
 


subdued
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 3/21/2009 4:09 PM (GMT -6)   
Yes. There is a genetic component to the Ulcerative Colitis, which means that there are people who prone to getting this disease. But that doesn't mean that one can't get Colitis without being genetically prone to it. If so, I would have gotten Colitis many, many years ago. My triggers are antibiotics and foods high in fructose. I've been setting off triggers like crazy my whole life.

No one in my family or extended family has any problems with their digestive system--no diarrhea, no gas, no bloating, no blood. Nothing.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Diagnosed w/ UC Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


subdued
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 3/21/2009 4:15 PM (GMT -6)   
As for whether or not to have children. There are far worse things in life than having to live without a colon.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Diagnosed w/ UC Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/21/2009 4:45 PM (GMT -6)   
Ya kiss520 I hear ya...there are those that can get what's called antibiotic induced colitis but as far as I'm concerned I think in those cases it's a clear observation that it's the antibiotic that was the trigger for their UC. Also, a lot of people don't realize there are different forms of colitis, which is why so many CDers even get confused when their docs throw the word "coltis" out there, the CD patient automatically assumes they now have both CD and UC when infact they only have CD but specifically crohn's colitis which is CD affecting the colon...some people refuse to understand the varients when it comes to IBD.

Researchers still have much to learn though and the less they know the longer it will take for a cure to be found for us all.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/21/2009 4:56 PM (GMT -6)   
Oh and Kiss520, you might find this helpful in understanding about the immune systems involvement with IBD (it's info from the CCFC)...

Mechanism of Disease

How specifically does the immune system interact with the cells (muscle, nerve, epithelial, blood products) of the GI tract to produce, maintain and resolve acute and chronic inflammation as seen in IBD
Investigations into this communication system are ongoing and producing promising results.

Funny how with research behind the immune system being involved (and that aprox 70% of the immune system is in the bowels) that many will still argue that IBD is not an immune disfunction.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


jars05
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 297
   Posted 3/21/2009 5:32 PM (GMT -6)   
AMK77 said...
My GI said that if one parent has IBD, the chances are 15%, if both parents have IBD 50%.

Wow that's pretty cool information. My mom had it and out of four children, I was the lucky one to also enjoy this disease. I pray every night that my girl doesn't have it (she's 1 yr 2 mo. old).
Age: 31
Location: Missouri
Diagnosed with UC in 1997.
Medications: 100 mg Azathioprine a day
 
 
 
 


Eva Lou
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Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 3442
   Posted 3/21/2009 5:51 PM (GMT -6)   

with all said, I too pray my daughter doesn't develop IBD- I couldn't deal with having to administer rectal meds to a child, & the emotional pain of watching them go thru it would kill me. It's funny, the talk about the autoimmune/genetic link- no one in my family has had IBD, per se, but there has been a lot of digestive issues- tons of IBS, & my Dad had colon polyps like you wouldn't believe. And, many many people in my family suffer from autoimmune disorders- lupus, MS, etc. I think a certain combination of predisposition to both autoimmune disorders & bowel problems set one up to fail. All you need is the trigger to get things in motion, whether it be antibitoics, food, bacteria, etc. If your body is predisposed to go one way, it's gonna go that way! Hello, ulcers! Where as one who doesn't have that genetic predisposition may have a tummy ache for a day or so. And subdued, i really like your comment about how living without a colon isn't the worst thing you can think of! So true. I think if I had developed IBD during my 20's, my wild years, I wouldn't have dealt with it well at all- being settled in a realtionship & with a child changes your perspective, & I can't imagine trying to live a "normal" life as a single girl- come on, I rode the subway every day to work! What, are you going to just have an accident on a subway car??! Or in a bar some night? No thanks...it's bad enough now, but at least I'm in my own little world, my own car, etc.


diagnosed with UC '02
meds-
Asacol- 8 tabs/day
Remicade-10mgs/kg- since 4/07
Imuran- 150mgs/day
various probiotics
Fiber supplement
 
 
 


vega19
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 91
   Posted 3/21/2009 6:28 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm the only one in my family who has UC or any digestive problems. My daughter was having bloody stools when she was 2 weeks old. She spent a few days in the hospital and switched up formulas and she's been fine since but I always wonder if that was a precursor for things to come. I would be heartbroken if she ends up with this.
31 year old female diagnosed with UC (entire colon) Feb 2008
(4) 400mg Asacol 3x a day
Remicade 10mg/kg every 8 weeks
Omega 3 supp, calcium supp
probiotic


subdued
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 3/21/2009 11:41 PM (GMT -6)   
I guess I should say this goes for my kids too. They are turning 20 and 28. They have no signs of Colitis. Neither does my 2 1/2 year old granddaughter. So no one, great-grandparents, grandparents, cousins, aunts, uncles, parents, siblings, nieces, nephews, kids, grandkid, has any digestive issues except for me.

It's really my own fault I have Colitis. I was on antibiotics for two years. I stopped eating breads, pasta, and rice after that. I then ate nothing but chocolate and drank nothing but high fructose corn syrup milk teas. Only then, when my colon was depleted of good bacteria and weakened from a poor diet, did I get Colitis.

If I was genetically prone to getting Colitis, then I would have gotten it many years ago. I had to be on antibiotics for ear infections when I was a kid. Apparently, my ear canals tilt downward, causing a buildup of wax, which often becomes dirty and gets infected. When I was in my early 20s, I was hospitalized for pneumonia, and I got this really bad sinus infection right afterwards. I was on antibiotics for at least six months. And then I've been on and off antibiotics ever since I was about 18 for acne. In fact, I was probably taking different antibiotics for the sinus infection and acne at the same time.

However, this is not to say that it's your fault that you have Colitis. Some people are prone to getting Colitis. I think that the effectiveness of treatments might be different for those who are prone to Colitis and those who aren't. I don't know. It would be interesting to do a study on this.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Diagnosed w/ UC Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/21/2009 11:49 PM (GMT -6)   
You can't say that subded, that you would have gotten it yrs ago if it was genetics, no one knows what all the triggers for this disease are and it could even be a combination of things together that trigger the disease. People are genetically predisposed to getting UC and CD and you also don't likely know what your great great great great grandparents, aunts, uncles, ect bowel issues might have been, this disease has been around for longer than most realize and people from waaaay back didn't exactly discuss their bowel habits (even with their docs) openly, some people today choose to suffer rather than tell a doc or anyone that they are having gut issues. And studies have and still are being done on this, go to the CCFC and check out the GEM project.
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


heathd
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 3/22/2009 7:18 AM (GMT -6)   
well i cant say about statistics with UC but i have it my mother has it, 2 out of my 3 siblings have it my mothers mother doesnt have UC but IBS and it turns out that her mother has alot of problems with digestion and her bowels. They have had this for a long time but i never knew it until the first time i was hospitalized, i guess it wasnt something that you talk about at the holidays and such. I have 4 children so i hope that they dont get it but with my family history of it i guess its probable. mayby in the not so far future they will find a way to suppress it or something.

diagnosed 2004
Prenisone finally off (oct 2008)
Prilosec otc (1 a day)
Sulfasalazine (12 a day)
Flora q (every other day)
Remicade (failed oct 2007)
Humira (started oct 2008)
Multivitamin (1 a day)


subdued
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 3/22/2009 10:31 AM (GMT -6)   
pb4 said...
You can't say that subded, that you would have gotten it yrs ago if it was genetics, no one knows what all the triggers for this disease are and it could even be a combination of things together that trigger the disease. People are genetically predisposed to getting UC and CD and you also don't likely know what your great great great great grandparents, aunts, uncles, ect bowel issues might have been, this disease has been around for longer than most realize and people from waaaay back didn't exactly discuss their bowel habits (even with their docs) openly, some people today choose to suffer rather than tell a doc or anyone that they are having gut issues. And studies have and still are being done on this, go to the CCFC and check out the GEM project.


Current research suggests that certain genetic factors may increase the likelihood that a family member could develop Ulcerative Colitis. It does not state that you have to have those genes to get the disease.

I come from a family that is very open and doesn't hide things. Besides it's kind of hard to hide Colitis. My relatives were never running off to the bathroom. They never complained that they ate something wrong. They never made sounds in the bathroom. They never had issues with having too much gas. They were all surprised that I got Colitis. And they don't know any other blood relative that has it.

I don't know why you have to insist that I have the gene for Colitis.

I do have some bad genes, some of which are far worse than having Colitis and are very strong reasons for not wanting to reproduce. So it's not the case that I don't want to admit to having a bad gene. It's that I'm not predisposed to this disease.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Diagnosed w/ UC Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


Sweetie31105
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 903
   Posted 3/22/2009 11:20 AM (GMT -6)   
I totally agree with you Vega, but I'm gonna be the paranoid mom, and monitor my children as best as possible. I want them to lead a healthy life, but if they get this disease.... well, God allows things for a reason, and He know what He's doing, so I will just worry about that when the time comes. I just know I'm gonna really watch out with my children.
27 year old, Married, Female.
Diagnosed with UC since March 2007

Taking Humira and Imuran since May 2007 (Currently in remission since May 2007)
Taken off Imuran 1/15/09
Only taking Humira.

Can't take Asacol, Allergic to Remicade


Christine1946
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Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 5963
   Posted 3/22/2009 12:00 PM (GMT -6)   
     My situation is very similar to Joy's.  I, too, took a LOT of antibiotics while growing up.  My family physician's answer to all ailments was a regimen of Erythromycin (since I was allergic to penicillin, as are both my daughters and my grandson).  I think taking all that Erythromycin contributed greatly to my UC.  I can remember as a child having bathroom issues.  No bleeding but urgencies.  I believe now that it must have been IBS.  When I was 52 I developed UC.
     My dad had diverticulitis and even had to be operated on because it formed a pouch.  Mom had IBS.  My paternal grandmother passed away from cancer of the rectum.  That was back in 1952 and doctors didn't know much about UC back then.  She lived with us and I remember that she suffered greatly.  She passed at the age of 65 and I am almost 63 now so needless to say it has me a bit concerned.  But, I stay on top of my condition and visit my GI doctor every three months.  He has me getting monthly CBC's.  I had my last office visit with him last Wednesday and he wrote a script for lots of blood work...liver function tests, pancreatic enzyme levels, etc..  My youngest daughter, aged 32 gets diarrhea quite frequently, but you can't tell her to seek out medical help for it.  God forbid she gets this as she still takes children's chewable vitamins because she said she has trouble swallowing pills....ugh.
62 yr old granny. South Jersey
Diagnosed with ulcerative proctitis in 1998 in hospital
Hospitalized (2nd time) in May 2008
Update 11/03/08...finally in remission!!  Hope I don't jinx myself.  Off the prednisone since 11/01/08...now see if I can stay off for longer than two weeks.  Other meds: 6MP (75 mgm), colazal (6 per day), Benicar and Toprol (high blood pressure meds), Probiotic (2 per day), fish oil capsule and multi-vitamin and calcium with vitamin D.


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/22/2009 1:31 PM (GMT -6)   
I know about current research regarding the genetics of IBD Subdued, I'm a member of the CCFC and get journals throughout each yr with updated and current info and researchers do believe there is a genetic predisposition of getting an IBD (either CD or UC), what they are not clear on is how it's passed down because it's more complex compared to cycstic fibrosis for example where there is a single gene defect involved and the pattern of inheritance for CF is such that the affected person must receive 2 defective genes, one from their father and one from their mother. But in IBD it appears that many different genetic defects may be simutaneously necessary to produce the disease...the mathematical pattern of inheritance that is the case with CF is simply not known in IBD. Which is why researchers say that it has been estimated that if one parent has an IBD there is a 10- to 15- fold increased risk that your offspring will also develop an IBD compared with those who do not have a parent with IBD. And that's not saying that only those with a parent that has an IBD are the ones that are genetically predisposed to likely getting an IBD either.

Even though much remains unknown about the cause of IBD, most experts agree on a basic framework that explains why people develop CD or UC. In essence, the cause of IBD lies in the complicated interactions that occur between the genes that IBD patients are born with, environmental factors and the ever-present challange of bacteria that live in the intestinal tract.

DNA is organized into genes that encode all of the instructions required to build and maintain living organisms. Genes determine physical traits such as eye and hair colour and height. Genes also program the body, for example, cells of the immune system are under the control genes that determine the strength, effectivness and appropriateness of an inflammatory response. Genetic infulences have long been suspected to play a role in IBD based on the following clues. 1) certain ethnic groups are at substantially higher risk for IBD than the general population. 2) there are extream cases of familial IBD where nearly every family member suffers from the condition. 3) in studies of identical twins, if one twin has CD there is a 40-60% chance the other twin will also have the disease.

If you don't agree with the above statements then you're disagreeing with one of the lead reseachers of the genetics and inheritance of IBD in Canada, who I happen to believe because he's going by scientific facts, not by "well I'm the only one that has it" which should be obvious by now, that could simply mean that other family members have not had theirs triggered yet, just as many people that were predisposed to having an IBD may have lived their whole lives without being affected by the disease simply because it was not triggered for them...you are not thinking out of the box, you assume becasue no one in your family had/has it that you're the only one so it's not genetic...and I guarantee you do not know everyone of your past family members health histories, especially their bowel health because people were shunned for discussing such things way back when and just because you have an "open family" now doesn't mean every family member from the past was open about things, especially poop things.

I'm not the one being closed minded about it and I do have the facts according to current and past research and how on earth could you even explain how someone gets an IBD without being genetically predisposed to it??? It's not like herpes or other STD it's a genetically predisposed disease. Which by the way was confirmed once again yesterday when I was watching the local news and they did a story on the "health beat" about a UCer and how he has a video on you tube about his UC and the GI in the story even re-confirmed that "in order to get UC, one must be genetically predisposed to getting it and triggers are involved with setting the disease in motion."

Here's a recent link regarding genetics linked specifically to UC (some different genes are associated with crohn's disease).

 

 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090104164208.htm

 
and other links related....
 
 

http://www.ashg.org/2008meeting/abstracts/fulltext/f21412.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010309080230.htm


My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

Post Edited (pb4) : 3/22/2009 1:58:37 PM (GMT-6)

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