UK or Canada--nationalized health care

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nucid
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Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 3/27/2009 3:13 PM (GMT -6)   
People from UK, or Canada do you like having nationalized health care?

I've heard horrible things about certain people being turned away from treatment with breast cancer, babies being born on bathroom floors, long waits for medical care.

I'm concerned that the US may end up with nationalized health care and I won't have access to treatment or the ability to have my opinion considered by the doctors. How bad is it really?
Female 33 Married
diagnosed January 2009
mild pancolitis
Sulfasalazine 500mg 3X

"The Lord is my Shepherd"


Mackster
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Date Joined May 2007
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   Posted 3/27/2009 5:07 PM (GMT -6)   
Nationalized is the wrong word to use with regards to UK/Canada/Australia/NZ and many EC countries. The word should be 'universal' health care. It really doesn't matter so much about the actual quality of the care, (that can vary from hospital to hospital just as it can in a private system) it pertains to a humanitarian concept that "every person is entitled to decent treatment REGARDLESS of how much money they have".

Some systems are better than others and some systems employ a combination of both private and free care. These blended systems are open for debate as to how they affect the whole concept of 'universality'.

It can safely be said that the US certainly has the most advanced health care in the world--AS LONG AS YOU CAN PAY FOR IT, (or be able to afford exorbitant insurance premiums).

The main reason that the British Commonwealth and certain European, mainly the Scandinavian social-democrat governments opted for universal health care, was for philosophical reasons. The very idea that in modern society that (sometimes huge) PROFITS are made on citizens unfortunate enough to require treatment for ill health is abhorrent when you really stop and think about it.

It may take a long time before any such system would be employed in the US. It would entail a massive sea-change in peoples' perceptions. Your own misguided concerns being a case in point.

You should be asking some of your fellow countrymen how they feel about not being able to afford insurance after losing their jobs, or even the more horrifying cases of patients getting so sick and expensive to treat, that they get CUT OFF from their insurance companies.

Like I said, as long as the big pharma companies remain greedy by keeping the cost of drugs artificially high, and litigeous nature of malpractice lawyers, and it costs about $15 for ONE tylenol tablet in a US hospital, it will be a cold day in hell before uncle sam gets a system that looks after EVERY sick person.

There's just way too much money to be made from bad health.

Joma
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 3/27/2009 6:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey there

I am a Canadian living in the US...an alien?!? Anyhow, having UC has allowed me good opportunity to make use of both systems. The US system is extremely poor in my experience compared to socialized medicine (the Canadian system is both universal and socialized, in that every Canadian has access and it is run by the government - a bit simplistic but in essence true -and paid for through taxation). It is absolutely not true that people 'have babies on floors' etc in Canada. Perhaps the one critisism of the Canadian system comes when you look at elective surgeries such as knee replacements etc. - there can be longer wait times for such proceedures because, unlike in the States, Canadian are not easily able to pay more to be seen faster and these types of surgeries are not life threatening. However, one could argue that most US citizens cannot afford to pay for faster service either and may be left at the mercy of an insurance company who doesnt view the proceedure as nessessary or messes around for weeks making a decision.

Furthermore, after having moved to the US and having worked here as a social worker for three years I have seen numbers of my clients struggling with healthcare costs they can't afford or not getting the treatments they need to save their lives. I myself have been denied health insurance in the individual market as a result of my UC and have found myself being very thankful I live in a state with a functional high risk insurance pool - many states do not have options for those with pre-exsisting conditions.

I recently read a report comparing the US and the Canadian systems. In short the report determined that 1) People living in the US pay 2.5 more annually for their healthcare than Canadians do 2) after measuring 'quality of care' indicators such as cancer treatment outcomes, heart attack outcomes etc over a wide variety of illnesses the report determined that there was NO increased quality of care in the US .....this despite the exceptional costs. I will try to find the link to this article if I can.

Lastly, I have spent more time down here fighting with my insurance company and screwing around with the millions of bills I have recieved for one small procedure than I care to add up. In Canada I simply called my doc, went to see him and that was it....no bills, no fights, no phone calls back and forth, no stress and no time wasted.

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/27/2009 7:45 PM (GMT -6)   
Yes, it's a lot better than what some might realize in Canada, and although our system isn't perfect, I'm certainly happy to being living in a province that has scrapped us from having to pay for it, we no longer have to pay for Alberta Health Care (they probably shouldn't have stopped it because I'm sure it will come back and bite us in the ass) but even when we did pay it was very affordable, a family of 4 for example paid 88.00 every month so that's pretty good, 1056.00 a yr for 4 people, the only crappy thing is dental and eyes are not covered under our provincial health care and I find them to be quite pricey (especially for the RX for eyes, thank goodness I don't need glasses or anything but my hubby and 2 kids do). Then again, insurance through my hubby's work does help pay for all medical RX and eye RX too.

I'm sure in every province there are health care horror stories, but I like our system better than what I've heard it's like in the US, no place is perfect, but some places are definitely worse than others especially if you're not super wealthy.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


Sara14
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Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4538
   Posted 3/27/2009 10:39 PM (GMT -6)   
I can't wait until the US gets universal healthcare. Then I won't have to worry about flaring up and lying on my bathroom floor in excruciating pain if I lose my job and can't afford to pay $800+ each month for prescription meds because no insurance companies will cover me since I have a pre-existing condition.
25 years old; <FONT color=#0000ca nights 3-4 every> Viactiv; Metamucil wafers; multivitamin; sublingual allergy drops; Ortho Tri-Cyclen


nucid
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 3/28/2009 12:48 AM (GMT -6)   
I wonder what the real cost of health care to you is when it isn't disguised in taxes.
The truth is the United States does have gov. funded health care, the contrast is so stark that most people don't want to go to a free clinic.
Female 33 Married
diagnosed January 2009
mild pancolitis
Sulfasalazine 500mg 3X

"The Lord is my Shepherd"

Post Edited (nucid) : 3/29/2009 6:00:40 PM (GMT-6)


Zippy123
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Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 735
   Posted 3/28/2009 1:12 AM (GMT -6)   
Mackster is right.
I hope we can get coverage like Canada, but I really doubt it with the insurance, drug and health care lobbiest influencing the government. They make so much money from cancer and supposedly incurable diseases like UC, they have too much to lose to let everyone have free health care and have costs regulated.
I hope Obama can do something to at least help though. Makes me wish I was living in Canada right now.

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/28/2009 1:57 AM (GMT -6)   
Well, the sad thing about Canada is our government is looking to more privatization (basically trying to turn our health care system into what the US system is like) although they say they won't let it become a negative and will continue to offer public health care like we currently still have but there are many Canadians that can't help but think it's another government lie and the true goal is for our govrnment to basically squeeze out most of the government funded and have more privatized than not. We already have some private in place, of course the way it works is, if you have enough money to go to a private place then you will get your surgery quicker, fantastic idea if everyone was a millionaire. Not saying that having a choice isn't good but usually the choice is in the favor of those with money. And although they say that if those that can afford private health take advantage of it that it will benefit those that don't because it'll supposedly free up the public hospitials, of course that generally only works in a perfect world, since afterall there generally are more poor-middle class than there are rich people, and afterall plenty of rich people might sooner choose public over private in order to hang on to their cash. As usual there are pros and cons to virtually everything.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


qwerty1
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 402
   Posted 3/28/2009 10:24 AM (GMT -6)   

I'm from the UK, I've never heard of anyone being turned away from care. As far as I'm aware everyone gets the care they need, it can just take longer to wait for appointments etc. You can go private if you have the money, and you get better treatment there but you have to be able to afford it!  

When I heard about how in the US you have to pay so much I couldn't believe it! What happens if you don't have the money to spare?! In some ways that to me seems worse! But I guess there are positive and negative points on both sides.


22 year old female, from the UK.
 
Diagnosed with Ulcerative Proctitis Jan '08, Proctosigmoiditis Jan '09.
Hospitalised Jan '09 for IV Hydrocortisone - had no effect!
Hospitalised Feb '09 for a week of IV Hydrocortisone.
  
Currently taking daily: 
20mg Prednisolone tablets (tapering)
5mg Prednisolone suppositories x 1
1g Acetarsol suppositories x 1 (soon to change to Acetarsol)
1g Mesalazine granules x 2
Vitamins A,C,D 
                             
                             


Joma
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 3/28/2009 10:27 AM (GMT -6)   
nucid

The studies comparing the cost of US vs Canadian healthcare take into account how those costs are paid for (ie through taxes vs directly from the individual/insurance company). In turn, despite Canada's single-payer system, Canadians still pay less for healthcare - significantly less - and still recieve a very similar quality of care. Truly, there is nothing to worry about and everything to gain from socialized medicine. Especially for those with pre-exsisting conditions such as ourselves. In this country healthcare is for the healthy.

I agree with the writer who stated that changing the US system will be very difficult as a result of the strong lobbies and the vast amounts of money being made by some. In fact nucid, you dont have to worry about the 'evils' of socialism at this point because Obama is far from proposing a completely socialized system - although he wants to strengthen government support for those less fortunate. Rather he wants to increase the employer based system and regulate insurance companies somewhat in relation to pre-exsisting conditions etc. He also wants to focos on cost cutting but it does remain unclear as to how he will do that in a for profit system.

Again, from personal experience, the level of distress I feel regularly as a result of living with the fear that I could loose insurace, my company will not pay a bill or cover a drug etc is huge. Growing up in Canada I would never have been on a forum such as this asking the question that you asked - healthcare was just there like water to drink and air to breath. It is a very secure feeling that I miss. jo

bookworm21
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 1766
   Posted 3/28/2009 11:23 AM (GMT -6)   
I can't wait until we have universalized healthcare. Then I don't have to be paranoid about losing insurance, don't have to worry if I don't get into grad school or get a job right away, or being turned down for a pre-existing condition, etc. I was actually thinking about joining AmeriCorps after graduating from college, and they don't cover pre-existing conditions! I'd be giving up a year of my life for less than $5000 to help my country but I won't have insurance?!? Ridiculous.
 
And I don't think Pres. Obama is going to make it completely universal; if we have insurance that we already like, then we can keep it. But the new policy would require employers to cover pre-existing conditions and would help to cut costs. But it'll probably take a while given the many other problems our country has and the influence of lobbies.

Sara14
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Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4538
   Posted 3/28/2009 11:39 AM (GMT -6)   
I wanted to try joining AmeriCorps too but can't because of the pre-existing condition thing...it is ridiculous.
25 years old; diagnosed March 2007
Asacol, 4 tabs, 3xday; Rowasa nightly; Viactiv; Metamucil wafers; multivitamin; Primadophilus Reuteri; sublingual allergy drops; Ortho Tri-Cyclen; persistant rectal inflammation


nucid
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 3/28/2009 12:11 PM (GMT -6)   
President Obama does not have to make it completely universal to have it end up that way. Why would a business pay extra if they could just jump on the government band wagon. Right now all nations are piggy backing on US innovation. I'm sorry but I would rather pay more to have better drugs. I am not rich, and most of my extra money goes to pay medical bills. But I also know that I wouldn't be turned away from treatment if my cancer only had 25% chance of survival. I think Switzerland has had socialized medicine the longer than Australia and England and they don't allow citizens to pay for treatment that the government can't afford because it would be unfair to other citizens who can't afford to pay for treatment privately.
My husband traveled to South Korea a couple years back. While he was there he injured his toe pretty badly. They didn't even sell bandages. You had to go to the hospital and it was a two week wait for that, longer than he was in the country. That was socialized med.
There are a lot of current problems with our gov. subsidized insurance. Just try to get a doctor to see you if you have medicaid and are not a child. The reason doctors limit the number of medicaid patients is that the gov. won't reimburse fully for costs. In fact all private insurers set the prices lower than what the doctors charge and it is cheaper if you pay in cash, because there is no government oversight for medicare. When the whole industry sets prices higher to rip off the government, I think we have a problem with the model. Of course everyone want free health care of good quality. But the truth is nothing is free.

I read the reports about health care. I honestly don't think it was a complete view. When you switch to universal health care it takes time to erode the quality of care that the private industry has established the effects may not be seen for 10 to 20 years. If government established price controls and the affordability of buying new machines was gone it would take some time for to pose more devastating results.
Government health care advocates used to sing the praises of Britain's National Health Service (NHS). That's until its poor delivery of health care services became known. A recent study by David Green and Laura Casper, "Delay, Denial and Dilution," written for the London-based Institute of Economic Affairs, concludes that the NHS health care services are just about the worst in the developed world. The head of the World Health Organization calculated that Britain has as many as 25,000 unnecessary cancer deaths a year because of under-provision of care. Twelve percent of specialists surveyed admitted refusing kidney dialysis to patients suffering from kidney failure because of limits on cash. Waiting lists for medical treatment have become so long that there are now "waiting lists" for the waiting list.
Malmo, with its 280,000 residents, is Sweden's third-largest city. To see a physician, a patient must go to one of two local clinics before they can see a specialist. The clinics have security guards to keep patients from getting unruly as they wait hours to see a doctor. The guards also prevent new patients from entering the clinic when the waiting room is considered full. Uppsala, a city with 200,000 people, has only one specialist in mammography. Sweden's National Cancer Foundation reports that in a few years most Swedish women will not have access to mammography.
Female 33 Married
diagnosed January 2009
mild pancolitis
Sulfasalazine 500mg 3X

"The Lord is my Shepherd"


JLG45
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 114
   Posted 3/28/2009 2:33 PM (GMT -6)   
You've got the wrong impression of Canadian Health care but many Americans are ignorant of how our health care system works, especially those who lobby against a goverment subsidized healthcare program. Those who understand it, wish they had a similar system in the USA.

We can visit any doctor/specialist we wish all that is required is a referral from your family doctor. I've seen three different GI's

No one in Canada gets turned away from health care. Our hospitals are some of the best in the world. Mt. Sinai in Toronto where I'm treated is world renowned for treating those with Colitis.
Diagnosed U.Proctitis 07

Flare Feb 09 - Diagnosed with Severe Pancolitis
Remicade, 50mg Prednisone, Cortenema PM, 1g 5 ASA suppository AM


Peety
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 2855
   Posted 3/28/2009 3:14 PM (GMT -6)   
One thing I have wondered about from the forum, without getting into the whole debate:
if you are in Canada or the UK and you decide your doctor isn't any good, can you change doctors?? It seems from what Jratt said that you can, but I thought some here had trouble with that.
49 year old female attorney, diagnosed UC/pancolitis 1985, no surgery but much suffering. Asacol/5ASA 6x400 mg maintenance for 20+ years; use prednisone & Rowasa for flares. 
August 2008 sought care of naturopathic doctor. Food sensitivity test showed wheat/gluten, other intolerances; eliminated all wheat/gluten from my diet. Probiotics (Ultimate Flora, 50 billion), trying Curamin. 
Flaring, seasonal? or supplements too harsh? Back on prednisone, tried to taper but now back up to 20-30 after several really bad days. Waiting for insurance decison on Humira...soon... 


Rio in Maryland
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 891
   Posted 3/28/2009 3:26 PM (GMT -6)   
Peety, when I was at university in England I was covered by the NHS and chose the specialist clinic to which I got referred to by the GP. I was given a choice of several clinics/hospitals. At the clinic too I requested to change doctors and see a certain doctor (the head of the GI department) and was able to get him. The process involves some administration and waiting around, but I think it works well. Also, if you'd rather not wait or deal with public health-care then you can pay out of pocket and go to a private practice.
Rio, 33 year old male. Diagnosed with UC in 2006
100 mg Azathioprine, 4800 mg Asacol
VSL#3 x 3 times a day, Metamucil wafers
Vitamin E enema or Mesacol/Asacol enema at least once a week
Spinach & sunflower seed diet

Post Edited (Rio in Maryland) : 3/28/2009 2:29:43 PM (GMT-6)


Joma
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 3/28/2009 3:51 PM (GMT -6)   
Peety

In Canada you can choose your doctor/specialist. As another person wrote, you just have to get a referral from your family doc.

nucid
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 3/28/2009 8:01 PM (GMT -6)   
So maybe its not as dire as it sounds. I still think that there are inherent problems with a system set up that way, but that's politics. I'm sure the choice of private care makes the public care better also. I wasn't aware that Canada had added private care also. A lot of our cost problems have to do with monopolies. The gov is not suppose to allow this, but they do because they can be lobbied as many of you have said.

Sara14--Sickly girl just posted about a program for people who are not insured that allows you to buy Canasa for $2. Also I think there was another drug but can't remember what. Sulfasazaline costs me $30 a month without insurance. Someone posted about shopping around and getting that down to $12.50. You maybe able to get your rx down if something else than Asacol works for you. Often there are many programs or special ways you can see a doctor if you don't have insurance. You just have to search hard for the niche. $800/m is a heavy burden to carry especially for someone as young as you.
Female 33 Married
diagnosed January 2009
mild pancolitis
Sulfasalazine 500mg 3X

"The Lord is my Shepherd"


Probiotic
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 2832
   Posted 3/28/2009 10:23 PM (GMT -6)   
As someone who has experienced the Canadian system in childhood, I'd say the craziest, and probably worst, thing about Canada's health care system is that private care (with a very few exceptions, including all dental care which, paradoxically, is entirely privatized) is completely illegal. Hence, the only safety valve to jump a sometimes months long que for certain surgeries or tests, or an all-day wait in a waiting room sometimes for a minor emergency, is to drive or fly south to the U.S.. At least most of the European socialized medical systems operate in tandem with a separate private health care system, so you can take your pick. The U.S. system of course is a bit of a joke in terms of bang for the buck- the world's priciest system is, when one averages it all out, still mediocre. But I think some sort of dual system is a better model than the Canadian system, which doesn't allow much patient choice if they are willing to spend more, other than go south.  The other thing about a universal health care system is that it may appear to function now, but may be completely disfunctional in a few decades when baby boom demographics result in each young worker supporting the system's expenditures on five or six retired people; i.e. there is never a free lunch.


Pancolitis >20 years, allergic to all 5ASAs
Tried everything under the sun (natural and alternative)
Some partial success with TSO but was too expensive to keep up 
Currently Remicade and lots of probiotics, tapering pred again, maybe surgery this year
 
 

Post Edited (Probiotic) : 3/28/2009 9:27:40 PM (GMT-6)


nucid
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 3/29/2009 10:11 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you Probiotic!
I was beginning to believe that I was the only one who still believes in choice.
According to the Vancouver, British Columbia-based Fraser Institute's annual publication, “Waiting Your Turn,” Canada’s median waiting times from a patient's referral by a general practitioner to treatment by a specialist, depending on the procedure, averages from five to 40 weeks. The wait for diagnostics, such as MRI or CT, ranges between four and 28 weeks.
A year old report came out: Currently, 750,000 Brits are awaiting hospital admission. Britain's National Health Services hopes to achieve an 18-week maximum wait from general practitioner to treatment, including all diagnostic tests, by the end of 2008.

I think people don't realize how long the wait is. This is unacceptable by American standards. That's not to say we don't have our problems. Certainly there can be better options for people that don't have insurance or much money. And there are some options now. Look at the Shriner's Hospitals. I would like to see us moving in the direction of more charities and private programs for people who need it. We are a very giving country.
Female 33 Married
diagnosed January 2009
mild pancolitis
Sulfasalazine 500mg 3X

"The Lord is my Shepherd"


Joma
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 222
   Posted 3/29/2009 11:56 AM (GMT -6)   
Nucid

Be aware that the Fraser Institute is an extremely right wing enitity in the same way that, say, Micheal Moore presented a misguided picture in 'Sicko', the Fraser Institute has the tendency to move in the opposite direction. I have found that they do not present a balanced picture of health issues.

cyn555
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 309
   Posted 3/29/2009 12:54 PM (GMT -6)   
the canadian health care system is really not perfect! i lived most of my life in Ontario and there wasnt really any problems there cause my dad was in the military and there was always a doctor on base. it came to a totally different story when we moved to Quebec. the healthcare system here is horrible. when i first starting having symptoms from UC i tried to go to the hospital in Gatineau. i waited 11 hours and the only thing they did was to take stool samples and blood work thats it. 1 month later i still not had any news from the hospital. i was down to 75 pounds, anemic, dehydrated. i had to do something. i decided to go to the general hospital in Ottawa which is in Ontario its just accross a bridge from my city. i waited 3 hours, they did lots of tests and that day i was really lucky cause there was a cancelation with the gastro cause i passed a colonoscopy that same day. i was diagnosed with UC and they put my right away on meds. the GI that was there decided to take me as a patient too. he also has his own practice downtown. and that doctor doesnt even take quebec patients anymore so i was really lucky. the only thing i have to do is pay like 50 something dollars for every visit. but most of the time the quebec medical insurance pays everything back. and the worse thing about the hole quebec system is that its almost impossible to find a family doctor. i really lost confidence in the quebec system. whenever theres a problem i go straight to the hosptial in Ottawa.

 
- 23 year old female, Gatineau, Quebec
 -diagnosed with UC june 2007 panacolitis
- Asacol (6 daily)800mg
- Salofalk (1 at bedtime) 1000mg


Jjc2007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 194
   Posted 3/29/2009 1:24 PM (GMT -6)   
nucid

Please, after reaming out someone for "rudeness" you are doing the same thing. You are making false generalizations based on what? An incident from your husband's travels? A right wing report?

There are some of us whose "choices" are limited because of "profit margin" being way more important than humanitarian care. If you are lucky enough to have money ANYWHERE your options improve. But at least in countries where there is universal care, poor people do not have to go to ER's for things that could be taken care of at a doctor's office. Here, when poor people have no options, they take their children, their elderly parents to ER's, thus clogging resources. As a result, other people have to wait...in the ER. So to imply the American system of private insurance has no waiting issue is not true for all. In fact, loss of life has occurred in the "waiting" areas of ER's because they are understaffed to meet the needs in urban areas.

We all have a right to political views. In my view, "profit" motive is NOT a good thing for health care.
diagnosed with UC in 1962
regualr meds:
Asulfadine (500mg tablets, 6 daily)
Folic Acid
Zantac as needed
open heart surgery in 2005 for removal of aortic root aneurysm


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 3/29/2009 1:35 PM (GMT -6)   
As I mentioned I'm in Canada and although things have changed quite a bit with waiting times for referrals and such for some reason (which I don't understand) it's not always the case, for example, I we had just recently gotten a referall for our daughter to see a GI (she's having some gut issues), back in my day I went from seeing my family doc one week to getting in to see my GI the next week including getting scoped my first visist with my GI, in my daughters case it was a four week wait to see a GI then 2 weeks after that for her colonoscopy so that really wasn't too bad considering how things have changed as much as they have in even the last 10 yrs (I'll mention that for me it was 18 yrs ago when I got such speedy results).

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


love4cats
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 458
   Posted 3/29/2009 6:07 PM (GMT -6)   
I am in Ontario Canada and it took me 3 years to get a family doctor and 6 months (from the time the doctor took me on as a patient) to get a colonoscopy when I was bleeding quite badly with horrible diarrhea.
 
My daughter went to emergency when she was bleeding and it took 4 months to get a colonoscopy.
 
Soooo I guess it depends on where in Ontario you live to get good health care.
 
 
Dx:  UC Proctitis 2006 
Meds:  None so far. Garlic works to ease flares. My GI laughed when I told him and said it was just coincidence. 
Started Meds:  Apr 9 08 500mg 5ASA (salofalk) to ease flare, tapering, stopped. 
Diet:  Regular fresh garlic, Biobest yogurt daily, Omega 3 supplements, very limited junk food, carbs and processed food, low fat diet.  Lots of fresh fruit and veggies (limited potatoes). 
 Added: tumeric and probiotics.
 
 

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