Please I need some advise & help

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Tinamarie
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 28
   Posted 5/7/2009 9:38 AM (GMT -6)   
I am so depressed & stressed out right now.  After my ileostomy reversal, I was going 20 plus times a day.  When I was in the hospital, the thought I had C-Diff, but that was negative...or it was because they were already treating me for it by the time they took the samples.  I had a colonscopy & the gastro dr thought it was diversion colitis but now it's obvious it's UC.  My colon/rectal surgeon mentioned that it could be Crohn's too....how do they figure out the difference.  I'm on all the meds in my profile & am still going 10-12 times a day.  Sometimes I don't even make it to the bathroom.  redface   <-- embarrassing.   I have so much gas, so much discomfort both in my stomach and my rear end because of going so often.  I have to see both doctors in a couple of weeks...I'm see them every other week right now.  I have so little energy...is that normal?  I used to run circles around everyone.  What am I doing wrong??? 
 
Thank you,
 
Tina


01/12/04 surgery to repair prolapsed bladder, partial hysterectomy
12/11/08 surgery to repair prolapsed intestines, bowel, rectum (enterocele, rectocele & intussusception)
12/12/08 surgery to find source of bleeding, hemotoma in muscle behind vaginal wall (down to 7 hemoglobin)
12/13/08 gelfoam embolism to stop bleeding (still at 7 hemoglobin)
12/30/08 surgery temp ileostomy and rectal stent due to rectovaginal fistula
03/18/09 surgery to reverse ileostomy.
 
Currently dealing with severe colitis, taking on a daily basis: 2 Canasa Supp, 4 packets of Questran, 2 Immodium tablets, 1000 mg Omega 3 tablet
 
PTSD, depression, migraine headaches, gastritis, colitis and anxiety disorder
 
 
~~Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising each time we fall~~
 
~~Dare to reach out your hand into the darkness to pull another hand into the light~~


Post Edited (Tinamarie) : 5/7/2009 9:49:36 AM (GMT-6)


PSA
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 498
   Posted 5/7/2009 9:57 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Tina

I am sorry to hear about your pain. I hope you will feel much better in a couple of days. As you may be aware, after the reversal, it takes time for the stools to become somewhat normal. Even though it may not become absolutely normal and you may have to go down at least 4 to 6 times. The pain in the butt is because of frequent BMs as it causes swelling in the butt. Take care. Apply some gel in the butt.

Have you taken lopamide or immodium.

Keep us posted. I will keep you in my thoughts and prayers.
45 years Male Attorney
Diagnosed UC October 1989
 
Had two stage J Pouch Surgery Nov 2005; Take Down March 2006
Complications after surgery - Incisional Hernia and Ano Fistulas
 
"There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle: Albert Einstein
 
"What you are aware of you are in control of; what you are not aware of is in control of you."
 


MustLoveDogs
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 394
   Posted 5/7/2009 11:01 AM (GMT -6)   
You're not doing anything wrong!!! Your body has gone through a lot of trauma and of course that will make you tired!! Let your body rest and heal. Depression is also a huge energy-drainer. Take it easy on yourself. Hang in there
Gwen
 
10 yr old daughter diagnosed with "UC-like Crohn's" 12/08
2nd opinion March 2009 - diagnosis UC and not Crohn's
 
currently on 2400 mg Asacol & Rowasa 1x day


Tinamarie
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 28
   Posted 5/7/2009 11:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you both for your support.

PSA-Delhi, yes taking immodium twice a day plus canasa twice a day & questran 4 x's a day. The reversal was almost 2 mos ago, the colonscopy showed definite colitis in parts of the colon...and also protitis around the area of the rectum that was resectioned.

I just thought after 2 wks of being on the meds, things would slow down more. Thank you both..your words mean alot to me.

Tina
01/12/04 surgery to repair prolapsed bladder, partial hysterectomy
 
12/11/08 surgery to repair prolapsed intestines, bowel, rectum (enterocele, rectocele & intussusception)
12/12/08 surgery to find source of bleeding, hemotoma in muscle behind vaginal wall (down to 7 hemoglobin)
12/13/08 gelfoam embolism to stop bleeding (still at 7 hemoglobin)
**Received 8 units of blood & 2 units of platelets during these 3 days**
 
12/30/08 surgery temp ileostomy and rectal stent due to rectovaginal fistula
 
03/18/09 surgery to reverse ileostomy.
 
Currently dealing with severe colitis, taking on a daily basis: 2 Canasa Supp, 4 packets of Questran, 2 Immodium tablets, 1000 mg Omega 3 tablet
 
PTSD, depression, migraine headaches, gastritis, colitis and anxiety disorder
 
 
~~Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising each time we fall~~
 
~~Dare to reach out your hand into the darkness to pull another hand into the light~~



pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 5/7/2009 11:24 PM (GMT -6)   
In CD, the location of the inflammation may occur anywhere along the digestive tract from the mouth to the anus. In UC, the large intestine (colon) is typically the only site that is affected. However, in some people with UC the last section of the small intestine, the ileum, may also show inflammation.
Symptoms
Many symptoms of UC and CD are similar, but there are some subtle differences. UC patients tend to have pain in the lower left part of the abdomen, while CD patients commonly (but not always) experience pain in the lower right abdomen. With UC, bleeding from the rectum during bowel movements is very common, and bleeding is much less common in patients with CD unless the CD is affecting the colon known as crohn's colitis, meaning it's still CD it's just affecting the colon.

Pattern of inflammation
The pattern that each form of IBD takes in the digestive tract is very distinct. UC tends to be continuous throughout the inflamed areas. In many cases, UC begins in the rectum or sigmoid colon, and spreads up through the colon as the disease progresses. In CD, the inflammation may occur in patches in 1 or more organs in the digestive system. For instance, a diseased section of colon may appear between two healthy sections.


Appearance
During a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, the physician can view the actual inside of the colon. In a colon that has CD activity, the colon wall may be thickened and, because of the intermittent pattern of diseased and healthy tissue, may have a "cobblestone" appearance. In UC, the colon wall is thinner and shows continuous inflammation with no patches of healthy tissue in the diseased section.
Granulomas are inflamed cells that become lumped together to form a lesion. Granulomas are present in CD, but not in UC. Therefore, when they are found in tissue samples taken from an inflamed section of the digestive tract, they are a good indicator that CD is the correct diagnosis.

In UC, the mucus lining of the large intestine is ulcerated. These ulcers do not extend beyond this inner lining. In CD, the ulceration is deeper and may extend into all the layers of the bowel wall.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

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