Some interesting Info i have learned recently

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summerstorm
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Date Joined Aug 2006
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   Posted 5/8/2009 9:56 PM (GMT -6)   
I know people are always wondering where UC comes from and what causes it.  And i am NOT saying this is what causes it, i have just seen and heard some studies lately that were very interesting. 
My Mom actually heard this one.  3rd world countries where there is not as good medical treatment and people aren't taking antibiotics and other meds there is a MUCH lower rate of UC, crohns and other Irritable bowel diseases!
 
I read this on Yahoo news a few weeks ago.
That countries that dont have all the cleaning craziness that we do in the "developed" countries, also have much lower rates of those diseases, and they often have certain types of parasites in their bodies.   The thought on what i read was that here and in other developed countries we have treated out water and sanitized so much that we are losing immunities against things and that we are NOT getting the benefits of certain worms and other bacteria.
Its the thing you might have heard "a little dirt won't hurt" 
The study actually said, "let your kid eat some dirt, let them eat that cookie off the floor" that those kids will be healthier!  If nothing else made me feel better about my mommy skills!

I know alot of this has probably been said before, and i am certaintly not saying these things are the sole cause, i just thought it was interesting!

basa0806
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Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 2103
   Posted 5/8/2009 10:11 PM (GMT -6)   
I absolutely believe a little dirt won't hurt. I think our country sometimes goes a little overboard with antibiotics. Doctors give patients anits for common colds when colds are viruses and not bacteria and then you're body becomes immune to the anti or something like UC happens or something else. I have thought for a long time that antis caused my UC. I was taking them for an h-pylori infection and took them too long and it killed the goodies and 6 months later I was diagnosed with UC. The same thing happened to me as a baby and I think it happening twice was just too much.
I don't really believe in keeping super clean all the time. Obviously wash your hands after using the bathroom and stuff like cuz that's just nasty! But your immune system is there for a reason. It is there to protect your body and keep you healthy. I think immune system strengthens by coming in contact with viruses/bacteria in everyday life and when we are constantly washing our hands and scrubbing our tables we are killing things that could possibly help us. There isn't anything wrong with the '5 second rule!' lol tongue
Sam(antha)
20 year old college student diagnosed in March 2005
Remission since January/April 2006->THREE YEARS!!!!!
Trying Colazal 3 750mg x2 (NOT for a full blown flare, just some random symptoms)
25mg Elavil
75mg Effexor XR for GAD
Will possibly go back to asacol
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude."
Maya Angelou


subdued
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 5/9/2009 1:16 AM (GMT -6)   
Yep.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Colitis Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


Shadam
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 307
   Posted 5/9/2009 6:50 AM (GMT -6)   
I'm convinced that a long period on an antibiotic set my UC off.  I cut my arm pretty badly last June and was on long term supply of an antibotic...3 weeks later I started seeing the symptoms of UC...

Age: 25 / Male / Florida
Diagnosed: 11/08 / Pancolitis
Asacol - 2 x 3 day (waiting for results)
6MP - 50mg - started 5/04/09
Prednisone / ended 1/09 (started at 30mgs and tapered down)
Mens Multi Vitamin - 1 a day
Calcium & Vitamin D3 - 1200mc of Calcium and 800iu of Vitamin D3  
Jaro - Dophilus Probiotic (3.4 Billion) - 1 a day
Diagnosed with PSC: 3/9 --now taking Urso
Sunflower Seed & Spinach Diet - Started 4/26/09


PalaceDan
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 50
   Posted 5/9/2009 7:04 AM (GMT -6)   
Me too. I work in development and had three bouts of stomach parasites over a couple of years (once from Bangladesh, once from Angola and once from Palestine). After various courses of antibiotics I started to develop IBS symptoms. Then another course of broad spectrum antibiotics a few years later was shortly followed by emergence of UC symptoms.
Diagnosed November 2007
10cm moderate
Canasa 1000mg 2 per day, Asocol 2x2 per day, Digestive Advantage Crohns and Colitis probiotic, Animal Pak multivitamin, Aloe gel, concentrated fish oil


Paul L
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Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 647
   Posted 5/9/2009 9:18 AM (GMT -6)   
This subject has been discussed here many times before. The unclean environment of some third world countries is one explanation but there are others. I tend to believe that the differences in incidences of IBD are due to the accessibility of good health care to the masses. Although there can be very good hospitals and medical care in the larger cities in third world countries, it is not accessible to the average person in these countries. Many people go undiagnosed and never get proper treatment. These cases are never reported and are not part of the statistics.

My wife is from the Philippines and she has an uncle that is a doctor. He works in a smaller town. Last time I visited the Philippines I had an interesting talk with him. He told me many stories of people not being able to afford basic medical care. One story of an infant comes to mind. A mother of 9 brought her baby to the doctor and was diagnosed with something that could have been easily treated with medication. The mother couldn’t afford the medication. The baby died. Could you imagine if a patient was recommended to have a colonoscopy and couldn’t afford it? Chances are they would never get it and never have a proper diagnosis.
Paul
Diagnosed in 2000 at age 43 with UC. Colon removed October 20/08.
Bad reaction to Asacol, Pentasa and Dipentum - can’t take any more 5ASAs.
Prednisone - worked well for 1 month, then side effects became unbearable.
6-MP - blood tests showed not metabolizing properly.
Corticosteroid enema, Flagyl, Ciprofloxin, VSL#3, Adacolumn Apheresis – no effect
Methotrexate with Remicade - 7 infusions with no improvement
Folic Acid and B12 injections.
Abatacept trial - no effect
Visit our photo albums at: http://www.laflammefamily.ca 


subdued
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 5/9/2009 11:19 AM (GMT -6)   
Hmm. I don't think this is for all countries. I used to live in Asia.

If Chinese did have digestive issues, they would probably go to Chinese doctors and take herbal medicines.

I had national health insurance when I was in Taiwan even though I was just a permanent resident and not a citizen.

I wouldn't be surprised if Chinese start getting IBS. Bubble tea drinks (which contain high amounts of HFCS) have become a very popular beverage over the last 15 years. Deserts and junk food are also becoming more popular in Asia.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Colitis Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


Malkavian
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Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 1439
   Posted 5/9/2009 12:41 PM (GMT -6)   
They're actually trying experimental treatments with non-virulent parasites (either hookworms or pig whipworms) for people with Crohn's and Colitis, I learned about it in my parasite ecology class. The reasoning is our bodies are so used to intestinal parasites that they don't know what to do without them there and attack the gut wall.

I was really surprised when all of my stool samples came back negative for parasites, as that's what I originally thought my UC may have been. I've worked with dogs and farm animals, own cats and dogs, eat sushi and walk around barefoot all the time (which is like begging for hookworm), you'd expect SOMETHING there.
21, female, diagnosed 3/6/2009
Mild ulcerative colitis from rectum to mid transverse colon
Currently in remission
Currently taking Asacol (3x/day) and Calcium/D supplements


summerstorm
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 6571
   Posted 5/9/2009 4:11 PM (GMT -6)   
thats the worms that were in the paper! i couldnt remeber for anything, lol.

It took into account that some people were not being able to get treatment or diagnosis also, because thats what i thought after i read the paper, but the one my mom heard on the radio adressed that issue.

I also got UC right after taking an antibiotic for a sinus infection, and everytime i would take one after that i would go into a huge flare! Even colonless now i am terrified of having to take one!

qsam6
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 90
   Posted 5/9/2009 5:37 PM (GMT -6)   
I believe I was born with it even though I was not diagnosed until I was 30. I do not remember the exact percentages though the report I read states that a sibling has a high chance of developing UC if another sibling has it, even if exposed to different environmental conditions. Athritis and sinusitis is reported at an early age by many who suffer from UC later in life. I was diagnosed with arthritis at 13, nasal polyps removed at 14, deviated septum removed at 26, symptoms of UC at 28 and diagnosed with UC at 30. It seems to follow a pattern starting at an early age. On the other hand, my brother and I are identical twins and we are now 36 and he has yet to develop UC. I have read reports of UC dating back to the 1940s, before we became neat freaks. I have no dought that antibiotics or something environmental triggers the UC, but it can not be the cause. There are people who continuously receive antibiotics for chronic conditions and the math doesn't add up. Those of us who receive them for a short term develop UC while millions of people who use them long term do not. I believe it is at the chemical or cellular level and is lieing dormant until triggered by an outside source. Studies have shown abnormalities in chromosome 6 of UC patients.

subdued
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 5/9/2009 10:50 PM (GMT -6)   
I agree that for many people it's inherited. However...

Antibiotics can cause colitis. It's called Pseudomembranous colitis, antibiotic-associated colitis, C. difficile colitis.

Antibiotics can kill the good bacteria in the colon.
Antibiotics can permit the overgrowth of a resistant bacterium called Clostridium difficile.
Certain foods support colon health. Others do not.

The math does add up. Taking antibiotics makes it more likely to get colitis due to an imbalance of fecal floral. However, genetics also makes it more likely to get colitis. It is this interplay that can be a determinant in just how much antibiotics one can have before one gets colitis.

For me, I was able to take antibiotics for years without getting any colitis flare ups. Once I took antibiotics every day for two years. As a result, every time I got a cut, it would get infected. I also had a chocolate and HFCS beverage addiction. That's all I ate and drank. I had terrible gas. My stomach would get huge. And I was constantly having diarrhea. I ignored it. I didn't know it was possible to bleed out the butt. I wish someone had told me.

My colon is getting healthier now that I did fecal transplantation, am eating right, and am taking Probiotics. I barely have any gas at all anymore. My abdomen no longer gets bloated. I rarely have diarrhea.

I still have issues with digesting foods high in fructose, but I can eat bananas, pineapple, strawberries, and lemons with no problems.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Colitis Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)

Post Edited (subdued) : 5/9/2009 10:56:22 PM (GMT-6)


Malkavian
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Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 1439
   Posted 5/9/2009 11:27 PM (GMT -6)   
:nod: My first flare was diagnosed as c. diff colitis, but the diagnosis was never confirmed. The biopsy revealed no psuedomembranes and my mother wouldn't give me a plastic bag to get a stool sample in (I went home as the health center doctors were being utterly retarded.) I then spent the next two years flaring on and off with everyone telling me I wasn't actually sick until I finally got a doc to take me seriously.
21, female, diagnosed 3/6/2009
Mild ulcerative colitis from rectum to mid transverse colon
Currently in remission
Currently taking Asacol (3x/day) and Calcium/D supplements


qsam6
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 90
   Posted 5/10/2009 4:04 AM (GMT -6)   
There are no scientific studies that show a correlation between antibiotic use and steroids. There has to be an existing abnormality that already exist within us that is triggered by antibiotics. Simply put, our systems were already compromised before our exposure to the trigger, there was no preventing it.

subdued
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 5/10/2009 9:42 AM (GMT -6)   
I asked one of the researchers researching genetics and UC. He said that "UC is a diagnosis of exclusion after infectious and other causes are excluded." Antibiotic-associated colitis is an infection of the colon caused by C. difficile that occurs primarily among individuals who have been using antibiotics. One does not need to be genetically prone to colitis to get it.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Colitis Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)

Post Edited (subdued) : 5/10/2009 9:45:22 AM (GMT-6)


Hellokitty
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Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 765
   Posted 5/10/2009 10:15 AM (GMT -6)   
I believe this to be true. First of all in non developed countries there is not the greasy fried food, dairy and take aways that I was broght up on. These foods do effect us. Since I have experimented cutting these foods out my UC has improved and Im on minimal medications (at the present). I’m still not perfect but I am better.

The other reason I believe this to be true is that I grew up with asthma. I was always on medication for this and I would get frequent chest infections whenever I got a cold or flu. If I had grown up in non developed country I believe I would have died. Although it is sad to think that you would have died, it still would have gotten rid of the bad genes I may pass on. I believe that because we can survive with illness it is weakening the gene pool.
Female 32 years old
 
Diganosed ulcerative colitis November 2007
Present medication- 1/2 X 500mg pentasa in the morrning= 250g pentasa (I reduced this to see how my diet will effect me) and 1 X250g Asacol every other evening
Diet- Tried raw food diet with 80% raw foods, found some pro's and cons. Started to add more products to keep up weight as mine did not balance. Still eating raw spinage and still am combination eating. No dairy No gluten.  
 
Other medical problems- Born with asthma- no medication taken for this.


qsam6
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 90
   Posted 5/10/2009 12:21 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm sure he misused terminology. I am guilty of it myself when I say that smoking causes cancer, if that were true then everyone who smokes over the long term would develop it. I don't recommend avoiding antibiotics to avoid IBD. There are enough people who die each day because they refuse blood transfusions and other medical treatment because of the fear of the rare incidents of what may happen. If antibiotics cause IBD then it is rare and does not have the same effect on the majority of the populace. The dangers of not taking antibiotics greatly exceeds that of developing IBD. 

summerstorm
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 6571
   Posted 5/10/2009 8:44 PM (GMT -6)   
the food we eat is def alot of what causes all the health problems in the US.
There was a study on Asian women who came here in like their mid 20s and were perfectly healthy, on their high carb diets, lol. And within like 5 years, even still eating the same kind of food, their health had declined because the food they were getting to cook with was treated and had all kinds of chemicals and such in it. And also most of them did add "american" foods to their diets. Their life excpecantcy cut by like 10 years or something too, and their risk for cancers sky rocketed.
It's impossible to say that our foods aren't causing us problems. Another thing was that the reason so many children are getting food allergies in the US is because of how foods are introduced one at a time. Kids in poorer families and other countries who are just giving them lots of dif things aren't getting the stomach problems or the allergies.
I think we are doing so much to keep ourselves healthy that we are really hurting ourselves.

UP09
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 5/10/2009 10:50 PM (GMT -6)   
As is frequently discussed on this forum, there doesn't seem to be one answer to how to treat this disease, we all react differently to treatment (different medicines, different dietary requirements, etc) It may be also that we each have different triggers. I don't know what triggered mine. Mine started when I was over 50. I don't remember the last time I used anitbiotics. We grow a large organic garden & I was the kid who always liked my vegetables - not that my diet was perfect. If you were to visit, I doubt I would be accused of being a clean freak (I never use antibacterial soap) and I'm sure I've had dirt under my fingernails more than once when preparing food.

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 5/10/2009 11:27 PM (GMT -6)   
qsam6 said...
There are no scientific studies that show a correlation between antibiotic use and steroids. There has to be an existing abnormality that already exist within us that is triggered by antibiotics. Simply put, our systems were already compromised before our exposure to the trigger, there was no preventing it.
I agree, this is how I see it as well, otherwise why wouldn't other people that over-use antibiotics and/or have a poor diet most all of their lives not get it as well unless they were predisposed to getting it.
 
There is still so much to learn though so at this point it's still hard to say exactly why it is the way it is.
 
:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


subdued
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3231
   Posted 5/11/2009 1:08 AM (GMT -6)   
The researcher I talked to did not misuse terminology. I was asking him about UC and antibiotics, because I was diagnosed with UC and have misused antibiotics in the past so it was quite possible that I had an imbalance of fecal floral due to an overuse of antibiotics. He was being very careful with his words when answering my questions.

The researcher stated that antibiotic-associated colitis is not UC, which means that if I had antibiotic-associated colitis, I was misdiagnosed. I misdiagnosis is possible because I had not mentioned to my GI my abuse of taking antibiotics. I don't think he tested me for C-diff.

I know it is hard to believe for those of you who are predisposed to colitis that not all of us are. However, I got colitis only after having had food poisoning, having swallowed the jaw bone of a fish, having taken antibiotics for most my life (one time for two years straight), and having eaten a diet consisting of only chocolate and HFCS beverages. That is definitely not being predisposed.
Joy - 47 yrs and counting
Colitis Dec 06 (also have IBS)
Currently in remission
Don't expect your doctor to cure your health problems. Your health is your responsibility.

Lexapro (for stress), Probiotics and Vitamins (a whole bunch of them)
Avoid HFCS, foods high in fructose, artificial sweeteners
When flaring: eat anti-inflammatory foods, avoid pro-inflammatory foods
Previous treatments: Fecal transplantation (worked), Prednisone (stopped working), Colazal (stopped working), Asacol (stopped working)


Old Mike
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 3864
   Posted 5/11/2009 6:25 AM (GMT -6)   
Folks this is called the Hygiene Hypothesis here is one article.
Old Mike
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2675108

Got2Believe
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 436
   Posted 5/11/2009 9:15 AM (GMT -6)   
I remember a caller on a talk radio show a long time ago maybe probably b4 i got UC said he and his family of like 4 kids hardly ever got sick and he thought it was b/c they all drank out of the same water bottles and shared their bacteria. I remember this probably b/c growing up I never drank out of someone elses drink not even my moms.
Well that caller may have been on to something or his family may have just been lucky. We'll never know.

pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 5/11/2009 10:44 AM (GMT -6)   
I did find this info specifically related to Pseudomembranous colitis (aka antibiotic induced colitis/C-Diff....

Once the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis is made, your doctor will stop the antibiotic that was associated with development of the disorder. Sometimes, this may be enough to resolve your condition, or at least ease signs, such as diarrhea.

If you have severe symptoms and your doctor suspects pseudomembranous colitis, you may be started on treatment before stool tests confirm the diagnosis. Once you begin treatment for pseudomembranous colitis, signs and symptoms may begin to improve within a few days, and they often resolve completely within two weeks.

To treat more-severe cases of pseudomembranous colitis, your doctor will choose from among a number of medications, particularly antibiotics other than the one associated with your illness.

Most common medications
The antibiotic metronidazole (Flagyl) is the first drug of choice for treating disorders associated with C. difficile bacteria. However, recent research suggests that the antibiotic vancomycin (Vancocin) may produce a faster response and may be associated with a lower risk of recurrence. If your condition is severe, your doctor may prescribe vancomycin first because of its rapid response rate. However, vancomycin only works when it's given as a pill. If you are very ill and not eating, your doctor may prescribe intravenous metronidazole.

If you're a pregnant woman in your first trimester, don't take metronidazole because of the risk of birth defects. It's also a poor choice if you're breast-feeding because the drug's effect on babies is unknown. Doctors also generally avoid prescribing this medication in children younger than 10 years old. In certain cases, doctors may give a combination of vancomycin and metronidazole.

Rifaximin (Xifaxan) is another antibiotic that doctors sometimes use to manage pseudomembranous colitis.

The antibiotics used to treat pseudomembranous colitis are usually given by mouth. However, depending on the severity of the inflammation and the medication, you may be treated with these drugs intravenously, via an enema, or through a tube inserted through your nose and threaded into your stomach (nasogastric tube).

Recurrent inflammation
Even in people who are treated successfully, pseudomembranous colitis may recur in up to 20 percent of cases within weeks to months after treatment has been completed. You may need a second or third round of drug therapy to resolve your condition.

If your infection comes back, your doctor may treat you again with metronidazole. If it comes back still again, you may receive a prolonged course of vancomycin to get rid of the infection.

Your doctor may also give you a yeast called Saccharomyces boulardii (Florastor) or another probiotic to help restore your colon's normal bacteria. Probiotics are dietary supplements or foods that contain beneficial bacteria normally found in your intestinal tract. Small studies have suggested that probiotics may shorten the duration of diarrhea related to antibiotic use and may prevent a relapse of C. difficile infection, but more research is needed.

Why antibiotics as a treatment?
Antibiotics cause pseudomembranous colitis because they kill the normal bacteria in your colon and allow toxic C. difficile to grow. Although it may seem strange to use antibiotics to treat a disorder caused by antibiotics, treatment with antibiotics eradicates the C. difficile and allows the normal bacteria to grow back, restoring the balance of bacteria in your colon to what it was before any antibiotics were given.

Dealing with dehydration
If you become dehydrated due to diarrhea, your doctor will prescribe electrolyte solutions to replace lost fluids. At times, these rehydration solutions will be administered intravenously.

Don't take anti-diarrheal medications — such as loperamide (Imodium) or the combination drug diphenoxylate and atropine (Lomotil) — without your doctor's knowledge. These drugs could worsen the signs and symptoms of pseudomembranous colitis.

When surgery is an option
If antibiotic treatment doesn't reduce colonic inflammation and ease your symptoms, and your condition worsens, your doctor may recommend intestinal surgery. This is rare, however; surgery is needed in less than 4 percent of people with pseudomembranous colitis.

Surgery becomes an option in people who have progressive organ failure, rupture of the colon and inflammation of the lining of the abdominal wall (peritonitis). Surgery typically involves removal (resection) of the diseased section of the bowel (subtotal colectomy).

So it does seem that this form of colitis can be completely treatable for most.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

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