Seems everything that heals UC is bad for you...

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Shadam
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 307
   Posted 7/28/2009 5:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Has anyone every realized that the few meds/options that really relieve "most" of their symptoms are bad for you? 
 
Prednisone has been the only med that has fully made me feel "normal", yet its one of the worst meds you could be on...also smoking, I've hear that smoking and nicotine have been life saviors for most, yet we know the issues with smoking!!
 
Why can't these billion dollar drug companies make a med that treats or works like Prednisone, yet does not have the harmful side affects...prednisons is obviously the one drug that wokrs for almost everyone...
 
Makes sense to me!
Age: 25 / Male / Florida
Diagnosed: 11/08 / Pancolitis
Diagnosed with PSC: 3/9 --now taking Urso
Asacol - 2 x 3 day (waiting for results)
6MP - 50mg - 5/04/09 - 100mg - started 6/11/09 - back to 50mg 7/8/09
Mens Multi Vitamin - 1 a day
Vitamin A Deficient - 10,000mg a day
Calcium & Vitamin D3 - 1200mc of Calcium and 800iu of Vitamin D3  
Jaro - Dophilus Probiotic (3.4 Billion) - 1 a day
 
~~~Praying for a cure~~~~
 


Liz3
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 28
   Posted 7/28/2009 6:45 PM (GMT -6)   
The saddest thing, is that they are FULLY capable of blocking out some of the side effects, but doing so would cost more money and take more time to release the drug and get it FDA approved, so they choose not to. I have a friend who works for Merck and he was telling me all about it. Made me kind of angry.
 
The 5-ASAs are the only ones with minimal side effects...but they do nothing.
 

kops2da
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 2865
   Posted 7/28/2009 7:57 PM (GMT -6)   

It is sad for sure.  I am thinking of asking my doctor if I can go back on prednisone.  I feel miserable - spasms, etc. etc.  Rectal meds are not doing much and I have to take Imodium and Tylenol just to function.

YUCK on this disease!  ElaineNY


 
Senior - diagnosed with proctosigmoiditis - 6/2008   
Cannot tolerate mesalamines.  New specialist (June) - Cortifoam and Anusol three times a day for now.  Hope it works! (finding it impossible to do three times a day however)
 
Probiotic Align, Prilosec for GERD, Gas-X, vitamins, Calcium/D
Tylenol for knees and arthritis.
 
 
 


quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 30591
   Posted 7/28/2009 9:03 PM (GMT -6)   
I've had success with 5-ASA meds for over 20 years. I wouldn't say they do NOTHING!

q
*Heather* Status: flaring...Asacol 3 twice daily; Salofalk enemas nightly
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~UC meds: Asacol (3 @ 2x daily); Salofalk enemas nightly for flares & taper to maintenance 
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed; Ranitidine (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma) 
~vitamins/minerals/supplementsProbiotics....(RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care + Primadophilus Reuteri). @ bedtime
~various digestive enzymes as needed
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 7/28/2009 11:21 PM (GMT -6)   
They could clearly make better meds with little to no side-effects but what fun would that be for the drug makers, I'm convinced they see the world of the ill as "ha ha ha, lets help a little bit with their main complaints but give them new things to complain about" the joke is on the ill, there's no doubt about it...look at viagra for example (give a man back his sex drive but make him blind in the process)...typical of the world we live in.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


TroubledTurds
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2004
Total Posts : 8334
   Posted 7/28/2009 11:37 PM (GMT -6)   
Quincy -
 
just curious: what's the longest you've been off the 5-asa's in the last 20 years ?
 
 
regards,
 
Lonnie
diagnosed with pancolitis december 21, 2003
currently taking: NOTHING !


Blue220
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 191
   Posted 7/29/2009 7:22 AM (GMT -6)   
This all reminds me of a quote spoken by my dad: 'You fix your face and your ass falls off.'

I wish people like us would go into these lines of work and revolutionize the way we handle meds. I'll keep dreaming...
22 years old

Diagnosed with moderate/severe UC June 2007, I've had it since December 2006.

Taking Lialda 3x a day<---NOT ANYMORE. I got pancreatitis from them (?).
I stopped taking Lialda 8-19-08. Ugh!
All I take now is just my 3 Entocort, and 1 iron pill in the afternoon.

NOW back on Lialda as of 8-30-08, not the cause of pancreatitis.
Going in for an endoscopic ultrasound on 9-19-08 to check things out.
Still on Entocort and iron. Yay...

Haven't been on here in a while (finally graduated college).
Update as of 5/26/09 - Now taking Imuran 100mg/day.
Taking Caltrate, iron, A, D, and B12. I still take 2 Lialda a day.
At least I'm off the Entocort.


princesa
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 2204
   Posted 7/29/2009 7:57 AM (GMT -6)   
I'd have to disagree. I can think of a couple of things that heal UC that are very good for you.

Omega-3 supplements reduce UC inflammation and help folks achieve and maintain remission. In addition, the benefits of omega-3s include reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke while helping to reduce symptoms of hypertension, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), joint pain and other rheumatoid problems, as well as certain skin ailments. Some research has even shown that omega-3s can boost the immune system and help protect us from an array of illnesses including Alzheimer's disease.

The amino acid L-glutamine helps heal the gut lining. There have been several recent studies into the effects of glutamine and what properties it possesses, and, there is now a significant body of evidence that links glutamine-enriched diets with intestinal effects; aiding maintenance of gut barrier function, intestinal cell proliferation and differentiation, as well as generally reducing septic morbidity and the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. In addition to its gastrointestinal benefits, it also improves brain function, stabilizes blood sugar and decreases alcohol cravings, plays an important role in muscle function and metabolism, and helps with wound healing.


Diagnosed with ulcerative colitis spring 1999. Have been in remission for years with only a few minor blips. Scope on 6/22 showed no inflammation at all.
 
Maintenance dose sulfasalazine. Probiotics, vitamin D, fiber supplement and fish oil caps. George's aloe vera juice and l-glutamine for gut healing. Mostly grain-free and dairy-free low carb diet.
 
 


quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 30591
   Posted 7/29/2009 9:31 AM (GMT -6)   
Lonnie...I was on and off the 5-ASA (oral/rectal) in the first 3 years but have been on them basically as maintenance since then.

The enemas I increase at the first symptoms of a flare (very mild which some may see as a blip) and taper. So I've not been on them nightly for 20 years.

The Asacol, however, I've been on 6 daily for pretty much the entire time. Once I upped to 8 for about 6 months.

I'm so far colon cancer free....I also have PSC which is a UC-related liver disease. My belief is that keeping the UC nice and calm will help prevent the increased chance of cancer as well as keep the liver disease in early stages.

I function and my colon isn't the main concern of my issues. Iut when it's not behaving, it just adds to the issues and I deal with things as early as possible.

So far, it's a miracle med to me....

q
*Heather* Status: flaring...Asacol 3 twice daily; Salofalk enemas nightly
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~UC meds: Asacol (3 @ 2x daily); Salofalk enemas nightly for flares & taper to maintenance 
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed; Ranitidine (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma) 
~vitamins/minerals/supplementsProbiotics....(RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care + Primadophilus Reuteri). @ bedtime
~various digestive enzymes as needed
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 


LuckyLindy
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 226
   Posted 7/29/2009 12:46 PM (GMT -6)   
quincy said...
I've had success with 5-ASA meds for over 20 years. I wouldn't say they do NOTHING!

q


You're one of the lucky ones I think. Seems like more people see no effects (or short-lived ones) than benefit. I see far better results from diet than Asacol (and similar), and even better results from Fish Oil caplets. Oh well, not that I could have afforded to stay on Asacol for a longtime anyway.
33 year old male
diagnosed severe pancolitis in 2004, unresponsive to all drugs
turned down recommendation to have j-pouch surgery
have been mostly symptom free since 2004 via diet modification (removed all carbs)


Sara14
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4194
   Posted 7/29/2009 12:59 PM (GMT -6)   
Asacol and Rowasa have helped me tremendously. I was in a severe flare and those two meds alone pulled me nearly completely out of it. It did take some time, though the Asacol worked pretty quickly.
25 years old; diagnosed March 2007
Currently: I feel almost back to normal...could be in remission finally or very close at least?
Asacol, 4 tabs, 3xday; Rowasa nightly; Viactiv; Metamucil wafers; multivitamin; sublingual allergy drops; Ortho Tri-Cyclen


LuckyLindy
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 226
   Posted 7/29/2009 1:08 PM (GMT -6)   
Shadam said...
Has anyone every realized that the few meds/options that really relieve "most" of their symptoms are bad for you?

Prednisone has been the only med that has fully made me feel "normal", yet its one of the worst meds you could be on...also smoking, I've hear that smoking and nicotine have been life saviors for most, yet we know the issues with smoking!!

Why can't these billion dollar drug companies make a med that treats or works like Prednisone, yet does not have the harmful side affects...prednisons is obviously the one drug that wokrs for almost everyone...

Makes sense to me!


The problem is that most medications are designed to fight the body. Our systems are very responsive to outside agents, and if a drug "picks a fight" so to speak, our body will fight back with a vengeance. The more potent the drug, the larger the response due to lack of normal chemical feedback.

In UC, our body initiated the inflammatory response for some unknown reason (bacterial, fungal, auto-immune, who knows). Whether real or not, our immune system sees something in our colon as harmful. Until we isolate that something, we're just fighting ourselves.

As an analogy, consider a boxing match between Mike Tyson (your body) and a high school band geek (your colon). After a couple minutes, the band geek is going to be all bloody and ready to quit, but Mike Tyson is probably doing fine. In the second round, the referee decides to let the band geek use whatever method wanted for protection. The more protection offered to the band geek, the more Mike Tyson will probably hurt himself trying to inflict injury (i.e. imagine a coat of armor). Prednisone is kind of like getting Mike Tyson to punch less by removing his tricep muscles. He's still going to try, but will probably end up punching himself in the face more than anything. Eventually he'll figure out how to punch backwards or something, at which point the only option will be to pull the band geek from the ring (Colectomy). But what we really want is to get Tyson to sit down in the middle of the rink for tea with the band geek (a cure).
33 year old male
diagnosed severe pancolitis in 2004, unresponsive to all drugs
turned down recommendation to have j-pouch surgery
have been mostly symptom free since 2004 via diet modification (removed all carbs)


Sara14
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4194
   Posted 7/29/2009 1:20 PM (GMT -6)   
I love your analogy, LuckyLIndy. That was great. So do you think the drugs are bad for us because they aren't actually fixing the root of the problem, just the symptoms?

I don't agree with the earlier insinuations that drug companies purposely make drugs have side effects. People would be more likely to take their product if it did not cause side effects.

princesa - What are some good sources of Omega-3s for vegetarians? I think nuts have some, right? Flaxseed oil? What would you suggest?
25 years old; diagnosed March 2007
Currently: I feel almost back to normal...could be in remission finally or very close at least?
Asacol, 4 tabs, 3xday; Rowasa nightly; Viactiv; Metamucil wafers; multivitamin; sublingual allergy drops; Ortho Tri-Cyclen


Peety
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 2855
   Posted 7/29/2009 1:47 PM (GMT -6)   
In the late 1980s I was very ill and headed to surgery when I was granted a special protocol through my doctor with the FDA to try an ASA drug, which was only being studied for Chrohs. It worked really well for me, and I took the study drug until Asacol was approved. I was afraid to ever stop taking it! My doc would say that the upper part of my colon showed scar tissue but was healthier than the rest of my colon, so that told her that the Asacol had a positive effect as far as it could reach.

Some drugs have risks, but that doesn't mean they will necessarily be bad for YOU.
Having been in the drug study, I can tell you they took note of everything I experienced, even if it obviously had nothing to do with UC... and that had to be put in the drug info sheet.
49 year old female attorney, diagnosed UC/pancolitis 1985, no surgery but much suffering. Asacol maintenance for 20+ years; used prednisone & Rowasa for flares.  Probiotics (Ultimate Flora, 50 billion), salmon oil (omega-3) when I can remember. 
August 2008 sought care of naturopathic doctor. Food sensitivity test showed wheat/gluten, other intolerances; eliminated wheat/gluten from my diet.
Bad flare in March, used prednisone. Humira denied, started Remicade 4/12 and doing great~ learning what normal is~ wow


LuckyLindy
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 226
   Posted 7/29/2009 2:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Sara14 said...
I love your analogy, LuckyLIndy. That was great. So do you think the drugs are bad for us because they aren't actually fixing the root of the problem, just the symptoms?

I don't agree with the earlier insinuations that drug companies purposely make drugs have side effects. People would be more likely to take their product if it did not cause side effects.

princesa - What are some good sources of Omega-3s for vegetarians? I think nuts have some, right? Flaxseed oil? What would you suggest?



"bad for us" is all relative. Sure, if we knew the root cause of the problem (and could "fix" it), current drugs would seem barbaric. But we have to work with what we have, and weigh the pros/cons. To continue my earlier analogy, some of the drugs may hurt Mike Tyson a bit, but the alternative of having the band geek pummeled to a pulp isn't realistic.

I also don't agree that drug companies are purposing making drugs with bad side effects. It's horrible business, and sets them up for competitive pressures later (since some company would eventually be able to make the same drug without side effects and steal market share).

Regarding Omega-3's, you really only have two good common vegetarian sources:
- Flaxseed oil (not just the flax)
- Walnuts

Most other vegetarian foods with Omega-3's have a low ratio of Omega 3 to Omega 6's, even oils we typically consider "good" (Olive oil for example). A few less common oils include Chia and Kiwifruit oil, both are similar in effectiveness to Flaxseed oil but hard to obtain. But none of them have anywhere CLOSE to the amount of Omega-3's as fish oil caplets, and the good fish oil caplets have them in a ratio that cannot be met by vegetarian sources. This ratio is what's important ... for example, many nuts (peanuts in particular) are pro-inflammatory since they have a high ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3's (opposite of what you want).

If you're willing to stretch your vegetarian diet a TINY bit, fish oil would be a great addition. Some studies have shown the 4g+ of fish oil per day (4-8 pills) is more effective in preventing UC relapse than Asacol, and that it reduces symptoms and need for anti-inflammatory drugs. Flaxseed Oil has not shown the same level of anti-inflammatory benefits in trials, although there haven't been as many studies.
33 year old male
diagnosed severe pancolitis in 2004, unresponsive to all drugs
turned down recommendation to have j-pouch surgery
have been mostly symptom free since 2004 via diet modification (removed all carbs)


Sara14
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4194
   Posted 7/29/2009 3:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks a bunch for your reply. That makes sense. I took fish oil at one time, but probably not in doses high enough to do anything. I know I read at least one study that said fish oil did not do anything for Crohn's....they didn't look at UC in that study though.
25 years old; diagnosed March 2007
Currently: I feel almost back to normal...could be in remission finally or very close at least?
Asacol, 4 tabs, 3xday; Rowasa nightly; Viactiv; Metamucil wafers; multivitamin; sublingual allergy drops; Ortho Tri-Cyclen


LuckyLindy
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 226
   Posted 7/29/2009 4:10 PM (GMT -6)   
I just searched and couldn't specifically find the study vs. asacol to which I earlier referred, but thought these references would be of interest to you:

http://www.oilofpisces.com/inflammatoryboweldisease.html

http://ibdcrohns.about.com/cs/alternremedies/a/fishoilibd.htm

Tons more out there ... if you're opposed to fish oil though, definitely take some flaxseed oil.
33 year old male
diagnosed severe pancolitis in 2004, unresponsive to all drugs
turned down recommendation to have j-pouch surgery
have been mostly symptom free since 2004 via diet modification (removed all carbs)

Post Edited (LuckyLindy) : 7/29/2009 4:14:58 PM (GMT-6)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 7/29/2009 7:25 PM (GMT -6)   
You think it's that simple??? You forget that drug makers have patents on their meds so they can do whatever the heck they want with their concoctions and if they create meds with side-effects then more money for them in the long run when you end up having to take meds down the road due to the side-effects from the previous, it's a viscious circle where they benefit and patients don't.

)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


LuckyLindy
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 226
   Posted 7/29/2009 7:41 PM (GMT -6)   
pb4 said...
You think it's that simple??? You forget that drug makers have patents on their meds so they can do whatever the heck they want with their concoctions and if they create meds with side-effects then more money for them in the long run when you end up having to take meds down the road due to the side-effects from the previous, it's a viscious circle where they benefit and patients don't.

)


Patents only last 17 years, which usually means a drug is only protected on the market for ~10 years before competitors start producing generic versions. It's easy to feel disgust and anger towards the pharma industry, but purposefully creating drugs with side effects is counter-intuitive to their goal of making lots of money.

Also, many of the smaller drug companies have no possibility for an ulterior motive since they wouldn't sell the drugs to counter the side effects ... yet these "boutique" drug makers and bio/genetic pharma companies churn out drugs with nasty side effects as well.

It really is simple - if you create a drug that attacks the body, the body will almost always fight back. Our body is regulated by feedback loops. The only potent drugs that lack serious side effects are those that attack foreign objects (antivirals, antibiotics, etc) since those drugs help the body instead of fighting against it.

That said - I do believe that drug companies are far more interested in finding treatments than cures. It's realistic to think that a cure for UC, Crohn's, Cancer, Heart Disease, etc are all possible within the next 20 years ... if drug companies cared to invest HEAVILY in curative research. But they won't, because there's far less money in curing someone than treating them.
33 year old male
diagnosed severe pancolitis in 2004, unresponsive to all drugs
turned down recommendation to have j-pouch surgery
have been mostly symptom free since 2004 via diet modification (removed all carbs)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 7/29/2009 7:49 PM (GMT -6)   
Our own bodies are what will heal us....think stem cell therapy, that will be the wave of the future for CURES not just bandaid-junk meds.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


LuckyLindy
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 226
   Posted 7/29/2009 8:21 PM (GMT -6)   
pb4 - I don't doubt you there ... once politicians get their hands out of stem cell research I think it holds great promise.
33 year old male
diagnosed severe pancolitis in 2004, unresponsive to all drugs
turned down recommendation to have j-pouch surgery
have been mostly symptom free since 2004 via diet modification (removed all carbs)


quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 30591
   Posted 7/29/2009 8:42 PM (GMT -6)   
I don't think the drug companies will be what offers a cure.

But, on the other hand...they may be perceived as offering band-aid treatments...there are still some positives as per 5-ASA meds, but yes, some can have serious side effects from them ..but all in all, it's better than the serious side effects and handed-out-like-candy treatment of prednisone.

In saying that....who seem to be equally irresponsible are the "natural cures" aspect of treatments (which to me are still medications in a different form).


Now what is worse??? I take medications because the ones I take work for me. I'm truly grateful that my first and only GI wasn't the one down the hall...I'd've been on pred for sure and my story here would have been quite different. GUARANTEED!!!

I wouldn't say I'm lucky...I'd say that my doctor knows how to prescribe the medication properly. Here I go again about rectal meds, but it's still an "ass"pect that's still sadly ignored...to the detriment of the patient especially if pred is initially offered.

Even those who are on natural treatments are still on medications....responsibility is still something that must come into play because not all supplements are totally free from problems or side effects or whatever. It's just that we are free to administer them at our own discretion sometimes at a very high cost financially or physically.

I personally don't see the difference....but I'd never stay on a med that made me feel worse than the disease I have..either mainstream med or natural.

If a doctor wouldn't prescribe accordingly (sans side effects) I would probably venture to other means, but I wouldn't blame the pharmaceutical companies...I'd blame the stupid neglectful and arrogant doctor.

quincy


*Heather* Status: flaring...Asacol 3 twice daily; Salofalk enemas nightly
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~UC meds: Asacol (3 @ 2x daily); Salofalk enemas nightly for flares & taper to maintenance 
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed; Ranitidine (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma) 
~vitamins/minerals/supplementsProbiotics....(RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care + Primadophilus Reuteri). @ bedtime
~various digestive enzymes as needed
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 

Post Edited (quincy) : 7/29/2009 8:45:39 PM (GMT-6)


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 7/29/2009 9:18 PM (GMT -6)   
LuckyLindy said...
pb4 - I don't doubt you there ... once politicians get their hands out of stem cell research I think it holds great promise.

 

Another reason why I'm glad to be canadian, we're already doing a stem cell therapy on a woman who lives near me that suffers with MS, because it's promissing results of 80% who've been treated with stem cell therapy for their MS have had ALL their MS symptoms come to a halt.  Stem cells taken from our own bodies means no contraversy.

 

:)


My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

Post Edited (pb4) : 7/29/2009 9:21:08 PM (GMT-6)


quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 30591
   Posted 7/29/2009 9:28 PM (GMT -6)   
pb4...curious if one has stem cell therapy..would one have to have it on an ongoing basis?
*Heather* Status: flaring...Asacol 3 twice daily; Salofalk enemas nightly
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~UC meds: Asacol (3 @ 2x daily); Salofalk enemas nightly for flares & taper to maintenance 
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed; Ranitidine (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma) 
~vitamins/minerals/supplementsProbiotics....(RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care + Primadophilus Reuteri). @ bedtime
~various digestive enzymes as needed
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 20577
   Posted 7/29/2009 10:27 PM (GMT -6)   
Stem cells differ from other kinds of cells in the body. All stem cells, regardless of their source have three general properties: they are capable of dividing and renewing themselves for long periods, they are unspecialized, and they can give rise to specialized cell types.

Stem cells are capable of dividing and renewing themselves for long periods. Unlike muscle cells, blood cells, or nerve cells which do not normally replicate themselves, stem cells may replicate many times, or proliferate. A starting population of stem cells that proliferates for many months in the laboratory can yield millions of cells. If the resulting cells continue to be unspecialized, like the parent stem cells, the cells are said to be capable of long-term self-renewal (The ability of stem cells to replicate themselves by dividing into the same non-specialized cell type over long periods (many months to years) depending on the specific type of stem cell.

I don't know if it's something that would have to be done for example every 10 yrs or something (I'm sure this still needs to be investigated), but I know with the MS lady that will soon be getting her treatment they will be wiping out 80% of her immune system and re-establishing it with stem cells for her specific treatment.


:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)

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