Diet and remission

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NurseNatural
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2018
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/5/2018 10:38 AM (GMT -6)   
I see some you tube videos about complete remission with diet control--anyone have any personal experience in this arena?
And if it's mild UC why go straight to Humira? Is there any turning back or decreasing your dosage during remission? thanks for any input

imagardener2
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 5774
   Posted 3/5/2018 10:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Diet without RX only works for a small percentage of UC people. Yes, adding very strict diet modification got me to remission when RX meds did not but it was almost always with RX meds.

I've never taken Humira but my understanding of current UC protocol is to hit it hard in the beginning. When I got UC 17 years ago the protocol was to start with lower tier RX and move up if the RX didn't work. That protocol did not work for me at all which made me turn to diet which took a loooong time to figure out. Most people don't have that amount of time.

Most people using diet modification use it in conjunction with RX meds.
Do not believe videos on the web, they want to sell you something.
Diet=gluten-free modified Paleo+potatoes+low dairy, low grain, no seafood (IBS),low fiber diet
In remission April 2010 after 10 years of UC after no remission ever
gluten-free =bleeding stopped, dairy-free (less IBS) started remission path+food diary
daily: Balsalazide 750mg and 2 Ginkgold tablet
rarely: VSL#3, mesalamine enema, Canasa supp, Citrucel

iPoop
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 13188
   Posted 3/5/2018 11:10 AM (GMT -6)   
NurseNatural, It's easy to cherry-pick a few success stories that we agree with. Important to note that majority of uc patients require medications. Also important to note that everyone responds very differently to the same treatment: what's one's miracle, does nothing for another, and makes another's symptoms a whole lot wose. So, there's lots of contradictions out there on what works for uc. What's my solution likely isn't yours, same goes with someone else's solution. Uc involves lots of trial-and-error to treat. I wish it was easy and that solutions are repeatable person-to-person but they often are not.

Try a lot of things, if you're so inclined. Measure and expect results. You'll find more that will not work than will. It took many years for those on the forum without medications to find their solution. No two solutions are the same in that group.

Research has been spotty and incomplete on diets and uc. Here's a review of the research out there:
/www.dietvsdisease.org/ulcerative-colitis-diet/
Moderator Ulcerative Colitis
John
, 39, UC Proctosigmoiditis
Rx: Remicade @5mgs/kg/6wks; daily 75mgs 6MP, 4.8g generic-Lialda, and rowasa

UC experience: wakeup with noisy bowels so no lingering in bed, soon after poop with discomfort/pain/mild-nausea, eat something, poop, get dressed, poop, leave in car and worry whole drive about more...

Post Edited (iPoop) : 3/5/2018 9:22:50 AM (GMT-7)


Uniform Charlie
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2015
Total Posts : 725
   Posted 3/5/2018 11:41 AM (GMT -6)   
Luckily more dietary research is being done now that there is so much focus on the microbiome. My theory is that if you were a dietary researcher you used to be mocked at all the cool scientist dinner parties. Now you can say you are a microbiome researcher and sound a lot smarter.

/chriskresser.com/aip-for-ibd-the-paleo-autoimmune-protocol-and-inflammatory-bowel-disease/

CCFA/IBD Partners research team current studies underway:
IBD Partners Research Team said...
:

The question of how diet influences symptoms and disease activity is a very important one. Dr. James Lewis from University of Pennsylvania has been studying the role of diet in exacerbations of Crohn’s disease in CCFA Partners. This study is called FACES (Food and Crohn’s disease Exacerbations). Many members of CCFA Partners have participated in this study, where they were told to eat certain types of foods and then had outcomes measured, such as gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, fatigue, quality of life measures and other factors. The study has now completed enrollment, and we are awaiting the results. We are hoping that this study will help patients know if red meat plays a role in symptom changes in Crohn’s disease.

Additionally, Dr. Lewis and colleagues were recently awarded a grant from the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, with additional support provided by Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, to do a randomized controlled trial comparing important factors such as remission and quality of life in patients with Crohn’s disease. This study will compare the SCD diet to a standard “Mediterranean” diet. This study is called DINE-CD. Food will be provided to patients and delivered weekly, to help to ensure consistency. The results of this study will be incredibly important to guide dietary therapies for IBD. The trial is currently being planned, and CCFA Partners members will be invited to participate once it is initiated. This study idea was directly proposed by patients, and patients from CCFA Partners are involved in the design team.

We have also examined the role of fiber in patients with Crohn’s disease in the Partners study. We reported that Crohn’s patients who ate the most fiber and the most whole grain fiber were less likely to experience disease flares or complications (link to manuscript and summary). Fiber can be metabolized by gut bacteria to produce chemicals that could help heal the gut, so the results are biologically plausible. It would be helpful to have additional studies of fiber in IBD.


You will notice no mention of UC. I can't figure out why we UC people never get to participate in these studies. nono
Diagnosed Proctosigmoiditis (UC) February 2015
Current Meds: Lialda 1.2gm 2x daily, duloxetine, rowasa as needed, Curcumin, VSL3 occasionally, One a Day Multi-Vitamin
Did SCD for about 2 years but lost willpower. Want to get back to it at some point.

DBwithUC
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4205
   Posted 3/5/2018 1:39 PM (GMT -6)   
You will also notice that they only outcomes measured were symptoms ( "gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, fatigue, quality of life measures and other factors") - not underlying inflammation and/or Chron's activity.

It would be a real pisser to live comfortably with diet-controlled symptoms while Chron's ulcer ate through your bowel wall and killed you with sepsis.
11/08: ischemic colitis and scope perf colon. 12cm colon/ileocecal resected. IV antib:sepsis.
01/10: Dx: Mod. UC pancolitis. Rx: Lialda 3x.
02/11: Major flare w/antib:sinus. Rx: 40mg Pred taper. 6mp.
07/11: Histol remiss rt/trans; worse sigmoid. Rx: Rowasa & hydrocort
---
Curr: 1-2 soft-formed stool, no urgency: Lialda 2x, NO PRED, probiotics, Vit-D/C

TroubledTurds
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Date Joined Jan 2004
Total Posts : 8358
   Posted 3/5/2018 1:51 PM (GMT -6)   
getting a little drama-queenish there DB ?
dx'd with pancolitis 12/21/03
current supplements:vit D, vit K2, cal/mag - grain free/paleoish diet that includes 100% grass fed beef, raw goat milk, & local organic free range eggs, lots of all natural well water, exercise, sleep as much as possible & enjoy this great life that God has blessed me with !

TroubledTurds
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2004
Total Posts : 8358
   Posted 3/5/2018 1:57 PM (GMT -6)   
i watch a lot of youtube videos - but mostly shooting and Black Sabbath stuff wink

diet mods are no different than UC meds > some work, some don't - only way to know is through personal experience -

gather knowledge, try different things and see where you land -

tell us more about your specifics -

(sorry, no experience with humera or any of them more potent meds)
dx'd with pancolitis 12/21/03
current supplements:vit D, vit K2, cal/mag - grain free/paleoish diet that includes 100% grass fed beef, raw goat milk, & local organic free range eggs, lots of all natural well water, exercise, sleep as much as possible & enjoy this great life that God has blessed me with !

IamCurious
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 3216
   Posted 3/5/2018 3:04 PM (GMT -6)   
DBwithUC said...
You will also notice that they only outcomes measured were symptoms ( "gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, fatigue, quality of life measures and other factors") - not underlying inflammation and/or Chron's activity.

It would be a real pisser to live comfortably with diet-controlled symptoms while Chron's ulcer ate through your bowel wall and killed you with sepsis.


IBD meds do not claim to cure, only to manage symptoms. I have been managing my disease for about 10 years with diet reinforced with some supplements. No meds. My colonoscopy results never indicated a Crohn's ulcer eating through my bowels.

But who knows, maybe it is my supplements like curcumin and probiotics that protect me from being eaten alive.
smile
Male, born 1951, DX IBD Feb08. No meds, allergic to Mesalamine. Food diary instead of SCD or Paleo.
When needed VSL#3DS sprinkled over powdered psyllium seed is very helpful.

Lactobacillus Reuteri (NCIMB 30242), Culturelle, Saccharomyces boulardii.
Fish oil, curcumin, extra D3, magnesium, multivitamin, glutamine when gut repair needed.

Resistant Starch and lots of fruit & vegetables (but no cruciferous), No Gluten, no soda, no HFCS, no shellfish. No processed foods with maltodextrin, sorbitol, polysorbate80 or carrageenan. No GMO foods saturated with Roundup.
Nature created all of the locks, therefore Nature has all of the keys

Chiron
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2015
Total Posts : 228
   Posted 3/5/2018 3:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Diet helps with symptom control but it has never put me in full remission.

I do think the microbiome is part of this.

What I'm afraid of is that once the immune system starts attacking the bowel it never really stops. Then you have goblet cells not working anymore so there isn't enough mucus in the bowel.

iPoop
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 13188
   Posted 3/5/2018 4:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Well there's flares and remissions, a cycle to it all. What's the trigger and cause to both is unknown. We know our microbiome is darn wacky as UC patients, but is that a cause or a symptom of having UC (which came first the chicken or the egg)? I am a fan of UC's an auto-immune-deficiency, and a messed up microbiome is a symptom and not a cause. Line up the perfect conditions and we have a cascade of problems that ultimately result in UC flares and the many symptoms that manifest during it. Of course, I could be completely wrong, who knows, it's a total unknown.

Post Edited (iPoop) : 3/5/2018 2:28:18 PM (GMT-7)


ambling
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Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 760
   Posted 3/5/2018 5:28 PM (GMT -6)   
DB is correct, that management of symptoms is not the same as avoiding a flare up. Crohn's Disease (as distinct from UC) can indeed involve a fistula tract that travels through the entirety of the bowel wall. That can become extremely serious for the patient. There isn't always symptomatic warning about that process.

IAC claims to have managed for 'ten years' with supplements and diet. I recall that a year or two ago he got into a bad flare. The only thing which saved him was a course of antibiotics.
At the time he said he understood how serious things can become even though symptoms are managed.

TroubledTurds was apparently diagnosed over 15 years ago. He hasn't had a scope for over 10 years, and claims that avoiding grains is what made all the difference to his health. It is possible, therefore, that grain intolerance was the major problem for him.

The degradation of the food supply is indeed a cause for grave concern. And it is a possible contributor for the prevalence of IBD. But it is unlikely to be the only contributor.
Once the inflammatory cascade (known as IBD) has begun, it is generally not a simple matter to prevent that cascade from leading to a flare up.
The cycle of remission and flare up is different for each person.

IamCurious
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 3216
   Posted 3/5/2018 6:28 PM (GMT -6)   
ambling said...
IAC claims to have managed for 'ten years' with supplements and diet. I recall that a year or two ago he got into a bad flare. The only thing which saved him was a course of antibiotics.
At the time he said he understood how serious things can become even though symptoms are managed.

I never said that I never experienced flares. I always get flares whenever I stray from my diet. As I have said over and over, I can remain in remission thru diet and supplements like psyllium seed. But once in a flare I need a short course of antibiotics to escape it.

My initial flare 10 years ago was a nightmare and I had no idea what hit me. My symptoms were as bad or worse than most of what I read here, To top it off I developed a painful perianal abscess. Fortunately antibiotics prescribed for the abscess also snuffed out my flare. I consider myself lucky to be one of the 15 percent of IBDers who are helped by antibiotics.

Since then I have maintained remission for months or years at a time by monitoring my diet and taking supplements as described in my signature. But 3 times since then I learned the hard way that going off of my diet will cause a flare. I always went back into remission after a 2-3 week course of antibiotics, but I didn't want to push my luck and resolved to stay on my diet.

My last flare was October, 2015. I had always been able to eat chocolate without any problem, but all of sudden chocolate began causing symptoms. I was stubborn and in denial, no one wants to give up on chocolate, and soon found myself in a serious flare that lasted almost a month before antibiotics cleared it up.

Two years later a colonoscopy showed that my colon was clean. I attribute that to managing my symptoms thru diet.
Male, born 1951, DX IBD Feb08. No meds, allergic to Mesalamine. Food diary instead of SCD or Paleo.
When needed VSL#3DS sprinkled over powdered psyllium seed is very helpful.

Lactobacillus Reuteri (NCIMB 30242), Culturelle, Saccharomyces boulardii.
Fish oil, curcumin, extra D3, magnesium, multivitamin, glutamine when gut repair needed.

Resistant Starch and lots of fruit & vegetables (but no cruciferous), No Gluten, no soda, no HFCS, no shellfish. No processed foods with maltodextrin, sorbitol, polysorbate80 or carrageenan. No GMO foods saturated with Roundup.
Nature created all of the locks, therefore Nature has all of the keys

Uniform Charlie
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2015
Total Posts : 725
   Posted 3/5/2018 7:10 PM (GMT -6)   
@DB, only the FACES study was a quality of life and symptom study. I believe the rest use fecal calprotectin and or endoscopy/biopsies. That being said I wouldn't hang my hat on any of these studies with the exception of the SCD study, which has not been completed.

As for the bowel eating ulcers... I honestly think I'd prefer 10-15 symptom free years followed by a quick septic shock induced death over 30-40 lousy, bloody diarrhea-filled years.
Diagnosed Proctosigmoiditis (UC) February 2015
Current Meds: Lialda 1.2gm 2x daily, duloxetine, rowasa as needed, Curcumin, VSL3 occasionally, One a Day Multi-Vitamin
Did SCD for about 2 years but lost willpower. Want to get back to it at some point.

quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 30976
   Posted 3/5/2018 8:05 PM (GMT -6)   
My ass hurts to read this stuff and some of the comments. I'm with DB and ambling on this.....tolerance and lack of knowledge regarding UC facts and symptoms seems elusive.

All or nothing, full out flare, get me to remission and cure in a week.

Hello.....no cure, and yessiree..... what the hell does this actually mean??
"What I'm afraid of is that once the immune system starts attacking the bowel it never really stops. Then you have goblet cells not working anymore so there isn't enough mucus in the bowel."

q
*Heather* I give suggestions, do with them what you will.
Status: ...Asacol 3 @ 2x daily; Salofalk enema @ 3rd night (nightly/ flares, tapered/maintenance)
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~Bentylol 20mg as needed; Zantac 150mg; Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma); Effexor XR 75mg (depression); Rosuvastatin 10mg (cholesterol); Telemesartin 80mg / Amlodipine 5mg (BP)
~vitamins/minerals/supplements; Probiotics....(RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care + Genuine Health Advanced Gut Health 15 billion @ bedtime)
~Metamucil capsules 6 @ 2x daily with meals; Vitamin D 4500 IU
~URSO 500mg @ 2x daily for Primary Biliary Cholangitis
"TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS" worth it !!

Post Edited (quincy) : 3/5/2018 6:08:21 PM (GMT-7)


Uniform Charlie
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2015
Total Posts : 725
   Posted 3/6/2018 7:51 AM (GMT -6)   
To answer the OP's original question, there are some doctors that believe in a "top down" approach instead of making patients "earn" biologics. It is a personal choice whether we, as patients, want to go along with this approach. Most insurances (in the U.S.) would probably not approve this approach without some extra work on the doctor's part.

I bet an internet search of just about any disease will find discussion boards full of claims of how people cured their disease with all kinds of wacky supplements, diets, routines etc. Most are probably b.s. Even the most intelligent, experienced and knowledgeable person on this discussion board has no idea whether or not diet plays a major role in UC because there simply is not enough evidence. My personal OPINION is that we are BEGINNING to see a small but mounting amount of evidence that diets along the lines of a hunter gatherer diet MAY be better than the typical western diet when it comes to creating a more diverse microbiome, reducing flares, inducing remission and reducing inflammation. This may be my own research bias but I haven't seen any research testing these diets and finding they are of no benefit or are harmful. I am talking about your trendy internet diets like SCD, Paleo, IBD AID diets. Many of the studies, unfortunately, are poorly designed or simply too small but they are slightly better than nothing.

I always enjoy the diet debates and I think we can continue to have a discussion without insulting each other. Who is saying they are cured? Who is saying diet is the answer to everyone else's problems? Who is saying diet is the only contributor to UC? Why is limiting diarrhea and rectal bleeding, or "symptom management" a bad thing? Nobody said a single thing about a "cure" or to just forego the entire medical system altogether. People are just trying to learn and/or help each other here. If you disagree with someone how about just asking them to clarify or respectfully stating a counterpoint?

Quincy if your ass hurts you should try rectal meds. Treat it from both ends, as they say.

smile
Diagnosed Proctosigmoiditis (UC) February 2015
Current Meds: Lialda 1.2gm 2x daily, duloxetine, rowasa as needed, Curcumin, VSL3 occasionally, One a Day Multi-Vitamin
Did SCD for about 2 years but lost willpower. Want to get back to it at some point.

iPoop
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 13188
   Posted 3/6/2018 8:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Back when healingwell was young and dinosaurs ruled the earth, there were vicious battles between those who used medications and those who did not. Thankfully discussions on this matter are now a lot more civil, but there's still the occasional insult thrown by those Veterans who's war-wounds ache when this subject comes up again. In the end, use whatever works for you. If meds or diets worked 100% of the time then there would be no cause for debate, but that book is still open. Cheers!
Moderator Ulcerative Colitis
John
, 39, UC Proctosigmoiditis
Rx: Remicade @5mgs/kg/6wks; daily 75mgs 6MP, 4.8g generic-Lialda, and rowasa

UC experience: wakeup with noisy bowels so no lingering in bed, soon after poop with discomfort/pain/mild-nausea, eat something, poop, get dressed, poop, leave in car and worry whole drive about more...

NurseNatural
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2018
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/7/2018 11:03 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you for information--it's actually my daughter with the dx and not me--it's frightening to get the dx and quite frankly I'm still in shock. Technically mild at this point but has worsened a little since last colonoscopy and GI wants to go to Humira--I've heard good and bad and am just learning--
Can you ever get off Humira or decrease dosage?

iPoop
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 13188
   Posted 3/7/2018 11:32 AM (GMT -6)   
What medications (names and dosages) and other treatments is your daughter currently taking for her UC?

"And if it's mild UC why go straight to Humira? Is there any turning back or decreasing your dosage during remission? thanks for any input"

It sounds like your doctor is an advocate for the top-down-approach. You can agree/disagree with that approach and decide what treatment you believe is best for your daughter. There's two general schools of thought on the management of UC patients. (1) Top-down-approach and (2) Use the least and weakest medications possible, first and work your way up if/when needed. There are pros and cons to both approaches, and firm believers in both approaches. Below is the general thinking of both approaches to help you understand the thinking: pros/cons/and gambles you make in using them.

1.) More and more gasteroenteroligists are advocates for the top-down approach. A patient might startout with Humira early within their treatment. Essentially, start with the stronger medications 1st or at least very early in the process, especially for those who will have UC the longest. Why? Their goal is to stop UC early in its tracks before UC spreads in extent and severity, and becomes a much bigger problem. Would you rather put out a fire when it is a small smoldering ember or wait until it is a 5-alarm-fire? The thinking is control and manage it early, keep the patient in a deep/quiescent/histological remission where he/she has the longest possible remission, least frequent and mildest flares for the best quality of life and overall long term prognosis. UC is particularly aggressive in spreading in extent in severity within five years of a new diagnosis, you potentially beat that hurdle. When UC progresses in extent and severity, longterm colorectal cancer odds jump substantially, as do the risks of hospitalization and other adverse events.

2.) The old-school approach for managing UC patients was to start with the weakest medications first and gradually work up the medication ladder if/when needed: 1st use topical anti-inflammatory mesalamine (asacol/pentasa/lailda/etc), 2nd use immunomodulators (azathioprine/imuran/6mp), and 3rd use biologics (humira/remicade/entyvio). The thinking is that if a patient is able to control his/her UC well with the lower classes of medications there is less risk of major side effects, and you can save stronger medications for later on for just those who ultimately need them. There's a lot of trial-and-error with initially treating UC, you might start with the weakest meds and then findout that a particular patient must go up the ladder within the first year, or first several years. That might result in multiple flareups as UC progresses in extent and severity due to initial under-treatment, and a more difficult quality of life until things are figured out. According to this school of thought, medications like humira are saved for last, after the others have been exhausted (often when Humira is first mentioned you're flaring severely, have been on prednisone for an extended period of time and exhausted lesser medications). You might end up taking Humira when you're hospitalized and/or suffering with a rather awful quality of life. The advantage is that for those who can be managed with the weakest medications that's all that is needed.

It's possible your daughter can sustain with the weakest medications indefinitely (Quincy has been on them for multiple decades). It's also possible your daughter's UC could spread quickly and become much more severe and necessitate strong meds quickly. There's no knowing ahead of time what each individual's ultimate prognosis will be. UC can be quite mild mannered and easy, it can be difficult, and it can quickly necessitate surgery. We all hope for the best, plan for the worst, and many of us land somewhere in the middle.

It takes more medications to achieve a remission than to sustain it. So it is possible to take less medications or lower dosages once a remission has been achieved and sustained. That said, often with biologics like humira we stay on those meds as a maintenance treatment indefinitely. As stopping a biologic can mean our bodies develop antibodies to Humira, and when we need humira again it may be either less effective or not work at all. That's not a 100% certain outcome but it is a risk to consider. You could certainly do humira shots less frequently during a sustained remission. If she's on multiple meds besides humira, then you can often eliminate everything but humira when in a remission.
Moderator Ulcerative Colitis
John
, 39, UC Proctosigmoiditis
Rx: Remicade @5mgs/kg/6wks; daily 75mgs 6MP, 4.8g generic-Lialda, and rowasa

UC experience: wakeup with noisy bowels so no lingering in bed, soon after poop with discomfort/pain/mild-nausea, eat something, poop, get dressed, poop, leave in car and worry whole drive about more...

Post Edited (iPoop) : 3/7/2018 9:42:28 AM (GMT-7)


NurseNatural
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2018
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/7/2018 11:49 AM (GMT -6)   
Excellent info and thank you--she has been on Mesalamine and some ?enemas--not sure name of it--She is my adult daughter and l don't know all the ends and outs--but I do understand the top down approach and yes I would like her to have long term success and remission--without it progressing!! I appreciate your fire analogy--Any mother would rather have it than watch their child suffer --ever--no matter what the diagnosis and no matter how old our kids get!!

brucen36
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2014
Total Posts : 292
   Posted 3/7/2018 5:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Diet alone puts me in remission, but the diet itself has a lot of side effects on me. I know not everyone agrees, but no one really knows what's going on with UC.
Male mid 40s.
SCD only, since 2006.
Since 2015: mesalamine 4.8 g/day and salofalk enemas as needed.
Psyllium husk (isabgol) 2 tbsp's morning and night (4 total)

notbob
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2016
Total Posts : 69
   Posted 3/7/2018 6:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Lots of good discussion here. For the first 8 years of UC I was hesitant to take any RX and lacked the discipline to stay on a restricted diet long term, mainly because the symptoms weren't bad enough to encourage me to. During my last final flare however I did stay on SCD for several months. The first 8 weeks I got steadily better and I was very close to full remission. Then the next several weeks I stair stepped down until I was basically back to square one. Then it got worse. I would suggest that UC sufferers reach a point of no return where things like diet or RX will not provide any sort of remission.
UC for 10 years, last two+ had the never ending flare from hell. Tried the usual meds, pills, steroids, biologics, diet, supplements and nothing worked. Had perm ileostomy Feb of 2017. Feel great!

quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 30976
   Posted 3/7/2018 7:32 PM (GMT -6)   
Bruce.....what side effects?
q
*Heather* I give suggestions, do with them what you will.
Status: ...Asacol 3 @ 2x daily; Salofalk enema @ 3rd night (nightly/ flares, tapered/maintenance)
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~Bentylol 20mg as needed; Zantac 150mg; Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma); Effexor XR 75mg (depression); Rosuvastatin 10mg (cholesterol); Telemesartin 80mg / Amlodipine 5mg (BP)
~vitamins/minerals/supplements; Probiotics....(RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care + Genuine Health Advanced Gut Health 15 billion @ bedtime)
~Metamucil capsules 6 @ 2x daily with meals; Vitamin D 4500 IU
~URSO 500mg @ 2x daily for Primary Biliary Cholangitis
"TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS" worth it !!

brucen36
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2014
Total Posts : 292
   Posted 3/7/2018 7:35 PM (GMT -6)   
quincy said...
Bruce.....what side effects?
q


Lack of energy, not enough carbs on SCD.
Male mid 40s.
SCD only, since 2006.
Since 2015: mesalamine 4.8 g/day and salofalk enemas as needed.
Psyllium husk (isabgol) 2 tbsp's morning and night (4 total)

quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 30976
   Posted 3/7/2018 7:49 PM (GMT -6)   
Oh, i can see that.
q
*Heather* I give suggestions, do with them what you will.
Status: ...Asacol 3 @ 2x daily; Salofalk enema @ 3rd night (nightly/ flares, tapered/maintenance)
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~Bentylol 20mg as needed; Zantac 150mg; Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma); Effexor XR 75mg (depression); Rosuvastatin 10mg (cholesterol); Telemesartin 80mg / Amlodipine 5mg (BP)
~vitamins/minerals/supplements; Probiotics....(RenewLife Ultimate Flora Critical Care + Genuine Health Advanced Gut Health 15 billion @ bedtime)
~Metamucil capsules 6 @ 2x daily with meals; Vitamin D 4500 IU
~URSO 500mg @ 2x daily for Primary Biliary Cholangitis
"TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS" worth it !!

TroubledTurds
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2004
Total Posts : 8358
   Posted 3/7/2018 8:05 PM (GMT -6)   
not trying to be a dumb-ass but do you have more energy when you're not in remission ?
dx'd with pancolitis 12/21/03
current supplements:vit D, vit K2, cal/mag - grain free/paleoish diet that includes 100% grass fed beef, raw goat milk, & local organic free range eggs, lots of all natural well water, exercise, sleep as much as possible & enjoy this great life that God has blessed me with !
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