any recommendations on effective diets for UC?

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justincane
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Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 11/16/2007 10:36 PM (GMT -7)   
i have had UC for 13 years, and generally it's been very manageable on just maintenance medication (asacol). however, about a year ago, i had a pretty severe flare and then another in april of this year. and lately i can tell i'm teetering on the verge of another one. i'm now taking azathioprine along with the asacol and have had to use prednisone this year twice for the first time in 7 years.

with the issues i've been having lately, i have decided to try and really tighten up my diet to see if can keep me from flaring as often. of course, there are dozens of diets that are promoted online and the question is which way to go? i've read literature on the atkins diet, elaine gottschall's SCD diet, dr. david dahlman's diet, etc......

has anyone has success with any of these diets or can you recommend another one i should look into?
thanks so much in advance.

Rio in Maryland
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Date Joined Nov 2007
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   Posted 11/17/2007 6:50 AM (GMT -7)   
Justin,
 
Here are links to two interesting discussions on diet that I read recently on the forum, you should find some answers there:
 
 
 
You're right that there's lots of literature on diets out there and I think it's a matter of giving a particular diet a try and seeing what works for you - as we all have different triggers and different reactions to foods.  It may also take some time for a diet to show consistent benefits so you have to be patient at times too.
 
I have researched many diets and find that following a bland low-carb diet (along the same lines as the SCD) is a definite first step to resting the gut; as well as avoiding foods that are fried, high in sugar.  Also, it is important to eat fresh foods and freshly cooked foods instead of processed foods.  
 
Currently, I'm also avoiding acid-forming foods and foods that contain yeast.  That limits my food options tremendously but I feel better and feel that I am gradually getting out of a minor flare-up.
 
Once in a while it's not a bad idea to get on clear-liquids (just for a few days at most) or on easily digestible semi-solid foods so that you give your digestive system a short break.   
 
I'm going through a flare-up and still in the phase of trying different diets to see what foods work for me, so this advice is coming from a novice - but I think I'm on right track.
 
Rio
Rio, 31 yr old male - diagnosed with UC in 07/2006.
 
Alternative therapies for several months (SCD, ayurvedic treatments, chinese herbs, VSL#3): didn't work and became anaemic.
Canasa, 2 daily: remission for a month then flared up.
Completed first (6-week) tapered course of Pred in 10/07, flaring up since coming off it.
Currently on: 4800mg Asacol (6 x 400mg, twice a day) & Aloe Elite (not sure if it works).
Holding off from taking next dose of Pred as the side-effects were strong, but may have to give in if I'm not better soon.


justincane
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Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 11/17/2007 12:43 PM (GMT -7)   
thanks for the help rio. i think i'm going to give the SCD a try for at least a month and see how my colitis reacts. i know it is very limiting, but i would give just about anything to get off these darn meds.

Horus
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Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 190
   Posted 11/17/2007 4:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Forget that SCD diet as it is too haphazard in it's approach and too hard to follow. Besides it's focus on casein as a protein diet source causes colon cancer in rats. Plus it thins out the mucus barrier in the colon which is NOT what you want to do. Here's the study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=16410726&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

Yes a bland diet will help at first. You'll have to invest in a crock pot and make mad amounts of stews. Raw vegies are out! Stew most everything.
Stay away from spices that will irritate your colon like black and white pepper, yeast extracts, MSG, and carbonated drinks. Milk is out.
Slowly start to increase resistant starches into your diet. That means beans, hi maize corn starch, tapioca, slightly green bananas, inulin, psyllium husk. Cut out red meat as it is way to high in iron and is hard to digest. Stick with chicken and turkey and fish. Read your food labels like your life depends on it because it does.

I eat nachos regularly. No hot sauce. Just organic blue corn chips, chopped tomatoes, soy cheese melted on top and make tacos and tortillas all the time. Just no jalopenos and you'll do fine.

I have rice all the time in various forms. I cut out wheat and oats and barely just to keep away from immune stimulating foods. Rice milk is a must. They have lots of good flavors. Most processed foods will be out as they have copious amounts of unwanted additives and spices you'll have problems with almost guaranteed.

You'll find gluten free items in most grocery stores and they are pretty clean of irritating substances and are good even if you aren't gluten intolerant.

princesa
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   Posted 11/17/2007 5:37 PM (GMT -7)   
Please don't make blanket statments about the SCD. If it didn't work for you, fine, but don't discourage others from trying it when it might be the most helpful thing they've ever done. Folks interested in learning more about it might like to read this excerpt from the Hoffman Medical Center Web site:


Curiously, the role of diet therapy for IBD is minimized by the gastroenterology establishment. One authoritative text, after devoting 20 pages to minute details of IBD diagnosis and drug and surgical treatments, notes tersely: "In mild to moderate ulcerative colitis, there is no need to impose general dietary restrictions."

This might sound, at the very least, counterintuitive to an informed layperson, who would question the dissociation between what a person eats and the condition of the selfsame alimentary canal through which food passes. The situation is analogous to that of a hydraulic engineer who makes no allowance for pipe corrosion susceptibility based on the acidity or chemical characteristics of the fluid the pipe conducts.

Ignoring diet in IBD also flies in the face of much evidence linking poor diets, especially those high in sugar and starches like bread and potatoes, to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease incidence. Historical documents date back to Greek and Roman times with references to detoxifying protocols that prompted remission in intestinal diseases.

Remission of Crohn's Disease may be maintained for long periods when foods to which patients are intolerant are identified and eliminated from the patient's diet, according to researchers from Cambridge, England, as reported in Drug Therapy (January 1986).

In their controlled study, seven of ten patients with remitted Crohn's Disease who excluded specific foods remained in remission for six months (Lancet 1985;2:177-180). In contrast, none of the ten similar patients who consumed an unrefined carbohydrate, fiber-rich diet were able to stay in remission for this length of time.

In a subsequent uncontrolled trial, the exclusion of certain foods enabled 51 of 77 patients to remain in remission for up to 51 months; the average annual relapse rate in these patients was less that 10%.

The investigators noted that this approach demanded a great deal of cooperation on the part of the patient. However, they added that most of their patients were so pleased with their improvement that they were willing to comply.

In my experience, the most significant breakthroughs for my patients with IBD have taken place with the "Specific Carbohydrate Diet" advocated by Elaine Gottschall in her book Breaking the Vicious Cycle. Ms. Gottschall formulated the diet based on personal experience with her daughter, who at age 8 was stricken with debilitating ulcerative colitis. Faced with the imminent prospect of surgery to remove her daughter's colon, Gottschall, then a young biochemist, sought out the advice of an elderly physician trained in turn-of-the-century Germany. His approach hearkened back to an early naturopathic tradition that recognized "pathogenic fermentation" as the root cause of gastrointestinal ailments. Gottschall's use of diet cured her daughter's colitis and out of this experience was born the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD).

The basic theory underlying the SCD is that disease-producing bacteria and fungus spread their toxic humors in the intestines when a natural balance has been disrupted. This can arise several ways:

inadequate breast-feeding

over-reliance on antacids

use of antibiotics

a diet high in sugar or starch

parasites or harmful bacteria or yeast from food or water

immunosuppression from disease, malnutrition or stress

toxic chemicals in food or water

natural aging of the GI tract

use of aspirin and aspirin-like pain-killer (NSAIDs) that inflame the intestinal lining.

In a "vicious cycle," harmful bugs proliferate, irritate the intestine, disrupt digestion, impair immunity, and foster fermentive degradation of certain hard-to-digest foods. The main dietary culprits: two-sugar and other enzymatically-resistant carbohydrates found in grains, certain starchy vegetables, certain fruits, table sugar, and lactose-rich dairy products.

Gottschall's Specific Carbohydrate Diet is a balanced, varied program consisting of meat, fish, eggs and poultry with most vegetables, nuts, and some fruits and sugars allowed. Lactose-free dairy products are permitted, as are certain ingeniously-formulated grain-free breads, cookies and pastries consisting of nut-meal. Beans are usually able to be reintroduced within three months.

Patients with IBD often note significant improvement in their symptoms within three weeks of starting the Gottschall diet. By twelve weeks, the majority are recovering definitively. One twenty-year-old patient of mine with ulcerative colitis took a full year to become symptom-free. She now maintains her remission with a modified version of the SCD that allows her occasional rice-based grain products. Another patient with ulcerative proctitis affecting the rectum had daily bloody diarrhea despite medications for years until initiating the Gottschall diet. After 18 months, he is completely symptom-free without the aid of medications. Elaine Gottschall herself is a frequent recipient of letters of gratitude from patients relieved of devastating symptoms.

Diagnosed with ulcerative colitis spring 1999
 
Therapeutic dose sulfasalazine, back on a pred taper for first flare in years. Down to 10 mg and feeling much better.
Probiotics, l-glutamine and fish oil caps. George's aloe vera juice and Mucosaheal.
 
 

Post Edited (princesa) : 11/17/2007 5:40:40 PM (GMT-7)


theklep
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 75
   Posted 11/17/2007 8:58 PM (GMT -7)   
Im confused...just because you have UC does not mean you have IBS, right? Because granted some people say that diet is what causes it and doctors will argue otherwise...so is it just person to person? Or is this more complicated than anyone has enough time to explain this notion?
Jeff, 23, Diagnosed July 2007 probably had it since 2005 but no real symptoms till July 2007 *Left Sided UC*
Lialda - 2.4mg 2x Day
Rowasa 1x (for spot treating and flare ups)
Centrum Multi-Vitamin 1X Day
Lexipro- 1x Day 10Mg
Ambien- 1x Day 10mg
Omega 3 Fish Oil- 2x Day


Rio in Maryland
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Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 891
   Posted 11/17/2007 10:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Jeff,
 
Yes, just because you have UC does not mean you have IBS - though you may have some similar symptoms.  From what I've read, the main argument about diet and UC isn't about a poor diet being the cause of UC but about an incorrect diet aggravating or trigerring an underlying UC condition.
 
(Though some may say that a prolonged poor diet is what causes UC in the first place and that's why it's more common in the Western world where more processed foods are consumed, than in developing countries, where people eat more freshly cooked meals).
 
This is a person to person thing, but there seem to be some foods that typically most of us with UC tend to avoid as they aggravate the condition further - for example dairy (lactose), caffeine, spicy, fried, high-starch foods.....

I also think this is a person to person thing as I've always eaten healthy, fresh foods but I used to smoke and a few months after I quit smoking I was diagnosed with UC. I think stopping smoking may have played a role in my underlying UC condition getting triggered - in fact, some studies show that people who smoke show lower incidences of UC and nicotine supplements have helped reduce flare-ups in ex-smokers.

By the way, a few interesting resources I've come across also mention:

- getting an allergy test done to find out what foods you're allergic to as they may be triggering the UC.
- getting a candida test done to check for yeast overgrowth in the intestine (and making sure you avoid high sugar and moldy foods and take some anti-fungal treatment)
 
There are many sources of information out there, some of which offer a diet-based 'cure' for UC - I think there's an element of truth to some of them and suppose it's a matter of seeing which ones make sense to you and then trying them yourself to find the right balance through trial and error (as I am doing).
 
Rio
Rio, 31 yr old male - diagnosed with UC in 07/2006.
 
Alternative therapies for several months (SCD, ayurvedic treatments, chinese herbs, VSL#3): didn't work and became anaemic.
Canasa, 2 daily: remission for a month then flared up.
Completed first (6-week) tapered course of Pred in 10/07, flaring up since coming off it.
Currently on: 4800mg Asacol (6 x 400mg, twice a day) & Aloe Elite (not sure if it works).
Holding off from taking next dose of Pred as the side-effects were strong, but may have to give in if I'm not better soon.


Sara14
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Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 4034
   Posted 11/17/2007 10:54 PM (GMT -7)   
Horus - Is that what you eat all the time or just when you're flaring? Do you avoid dairy and wheat, oats and barley all the time?

Princesca - Is the Hoffman Medical Center you cited an alternative medicine center?
23 years old
Diagnosed with UC March 2007
Current inflamation in the rectum
Asacol 4 tablets 3x/day
Rowasa (generic) - as needed for flares
Nature's Way Primadophilus Reuteri 1/day; Chewable multivitamin; Metamucil; Viactiv (Calcium and Vit. D) for Osteopenia; flaxseed


kazygirl
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Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 955
   Posted 11/18/2007 1:20 AM (GMT -7)   
i went to a dietician for 4 months and tried every diet in the book including a strictly liquid diet to "give my bowels a rest"... and none of them had any effect on me.

the thing "i think" that matters with UC is that your colon is tender and raw and ulcerated and bleeding and sore...etc.. so if you eat, say seeds, they can scrape along your colon and cause more pain to the already tender and raw lining. that is the thing i think you have to really take into consideration with food and UC. dont eat the foods that physically hurt it as it passes through like corn and raw lettuce (roughage) and stuff like that.

but once again.. everyone is different. some people control their UC with diet and others can't. for some its caused by a bacteria. they dont really know the causes.. my grandmas side of the family all has some form of auto-immune disease in the colon area. so im hereditarily screwed LOL.

the only thing to do is try it and see if it works for you.

as for IBS and UC... well they are 2 different diseases.
UC is 1 of 2 inflammatory bowel diseases (the other being crohn's) which is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT to "irritable" bowel syndrome.
31 year old female - diagnosed UC in 2000
started as proctitis and now is pancolitis..this year long flare is now severe on left side only.
**3 weeks out of hospital/no colitis symptoms... normal bm's only 1x a day + no blood
50mg prednisone 1x  with lunch or breakfast
50mg imuran 1x  8pm stopped it to try and have a baby
2x 500mg mesalazine 2x day + night
VSL#3 didnt work
Aloe Elite didnt work
Budesonide 9mg day didnt work
ive lost 40+lbs and my legs look like sticks ... ewww
 


Horus
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2007
Total Posts : 190
   Posted 11/18/2007 2:15 PM (GMT -7)   
So much to rant about in here I barely can contain myself in regards to the misinformation parroted out like a broken recond based on unknown and nonpeer reviewed research.

The very thought that things you injest doesn't effect IBD is so counter intuitive that it is almost heretical. For those that think that things you put in your mouth can't effect you then I suggest
you experiment with deep fried salted and peppered jalepenos and raw eggs for starters. Next let's get a TALL glass of orange juice and some tomato juice and citrus derived vodka shots and some
tequilla with lime chasers lined up to wash the jalepenos down. Don't forget to salt the rim! I'd dip the jalepenos in hot mustard sauce then double dip it in apple cider vinegar just for good measure. MMMm
Hopefully we can find some nice whole milk now to down since our taste buds will be on fire. But don't forget to squirt some chocolate syrup in it. I think a double choclate latte espresso from starbucks would do
nicely in this situation. But don't stop there. A nice juicy steak marinated in every kind of spice you have in the cabinet would be the main course now and make sure it is charcoaled black well done style. I'm sure I can eat a salad with my steak so load up on any randomly chosen salad dressing since it won't matter right? Make the salad chock full of onions and vinegar marinated olives of every kind. Croutons? Pile them on! Then put some more pepper on that salad. What's a salad without alot of salt and more pepper? I just can't eat much steak without my heinz 57 sauce with 57 herbs and spices in it so load me up waiter!! You just can't have steak though without dinner rolls and butter and I'm feeling hungry so make sure and give me the super sized variety. I'm hoping I can save room for desert. What's this? The steak comes with fire roasted bell peppers and corn on the cob? OH YESS!!!!!!! I need 2 ears of corn please! Keep it coming till I say stop! We have no problem with corn niblets right? Good thing I have some mushroom gravey and french fries on the side to keep me going. Oh so delicous. Did you say wine? Oh pour me some of that too. I can find room for wine. I bet that will calm things right down. Is it time for destert already? How about some fire carmelized cheese cake topped with fresh fruit and more chocolate ice cream please! Feels so good to get that down. Waiter don't forget my after dinner drink to go with my desert. How about a Grand Marnier if you please. Now just make sure I chomp down on some bubble yum gum on the way home so my breath smells fresh. What a meal. I think I'll eat like this every day. For food has no bearing on how one feels with IBD, right? Now where's my cigar?


The SCD is based on false assumptions and no real peer reviewed science. It's almost like the eat right for your blood type diet science. Her approach mainly deals with bacteria as the cause and and thus makes you cut out all resistant starches that could feed bacteria in the colon. WHAT a CROCK of huey. This extremely narrow view of science forgets about genetics, viruses, and the fact that they know almost NOTHING about the bacteria we do have in our colons even today, what feeds them, what they secrete that's so harmful, and all the other unknowns like mucus layers and on and on ad infinit. There must be dozens upon dozens of types of IBD cuased by all kinds of different things, all seperate and distinct from another. Starving bacteria in the colon won't get you over that. I wonder if elaine has ever even seen a colonoscope before?

Want more? OK how about that previous statement you churned out from elain's book, "This might sound, at the very least, counterintuitive to an informed layperson, who would question the dissociation between what a person eats and the condition of the selfsame alimentary canal through which food passes. The situation is analogous to that of a hydraulic engineer who makes no allowance for pipe corrosion susceptibility based on the acidity or chemical characteristics of the fluid the pipe conducts."

Now at least here she makes sense. However, she fails to know just how much she is ignorant of when it comes to what can cause our gastro intestinal pipe corrosion. Now admittedly I'm no fan of sugar nor of processed foods. So far so good elaine. However where she gets it' wrong is placing too much emphasis on eliminating resistant starches too. Poor elaine must not have known about butyrate or mucus. Her selective ignorance of other things causes genetics and environmental and placing all the blame on bacteria and yeast is her downfall. For we know much more today than we did way back in the 70's when elaine got her degree. Do you really think in 37 years we haven't learned anything new? We don't know hardly anything about bacteria now and even less in the 70's. Funny how yeast just goes away on it's own when inflammation stops without resorting to taking specific antifungals. Besides antifungals have been tried for decades for IBD. No cure there. Nystatin has been talked about forever and still people relapse while on it. Antibiotics have been tried in every flavor known to man. No mass cure there. As we can see by the latest research all kinds of different things are causing IBD symtoms that were never even thought of during elaines time. One only has to read the lates CCFA or the most recent GUT or Gastroenterology medical journal to wake up to the notion of how narrow minded elaines approach is. Sure she has some good points but they are very very few and far between. She just didn't know that she didn't know anything.

:)







Post Edited By Moderator (MMMNAVY) : 11/18/2007 3:36:53 PM (GMT-7)


MMMNAVY
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Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 6927
   Posted 11/18/2007 3:46 PM (GMT -7)   
I have tried the SCD and had a very bad result from it (hospital, blood trans.,etc), however there are people who have said they have gained remission on it. Any graduate student would tell you that any study that is over 5 years old is mainly a poor research material. Do your own research and see if you think this diet will benefit you. This is a very hotly contested topic on here, so please don't think that you are not welcome it is just a very old arguement here. Personally my advice is to aviod foods that make you hurt.
Forum Moderator 
We will find a way, or make one.-Hannibal (crossing the Alps in the 15th Century on war elephants) 
Make sure your suffering has meaning...


princesa
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 2198
   Posted 11/18/2007 5:03 PM (GMT -7)   
Horus said...
OK how about that previous statement you churned out from elain's book, "This might sound, at the very least, counterintuitive to an informed layperson, who would question the dissociation between what a person eats and the condition of the selfsame alimentary canal through which food passes. The situation is analogous to that of a hydraulic engineer who makes no allowance for pipe corrosion susceptibility based on the acidity or chemical characteristics of the fluid the pipe conducts."

Now at least here she makes sense. However, she fails to know just how much she is ignorant of when it comes to what can cause our gastro intestinal pipe corrosion.
If you're going to attack my posts, at least read and understand what's being said by whom. The quote is not from Elaine or the SCD book. The quote is from the very well-known and respected Dr. Ronald Hoffman of the Hoffman Clinic in New York City.
 
Sara14 said...
Princesca - Is the Hoffman Medical Center you cited an alternative medicine center?

The Hoffman Center is a complimentary medical clinic, combining traditional allopathic treatments with alternative medicine. You can learn more here:

http://www.drhoffman.com/

If you look under Center>Health Conditions and Concerns, you can read several articles on inflammatory bowel disease and their treatment protocols.


Diagnosed with ulcerative colitis spring 1999
 
Therapeutic dose sulfasalazine, back on a pred taper for first flare in years. Down to 10 mg and feeling much better.
Probiotics, l-glutamine and fish oil caps. George's aloe vera juice and Mucosaheal.
 
 


tjf
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Date Joined Dec 2005
Total Posts : 3238
   Posted 11/18/2007 5:08 PM (GMT -7)   
I know we all are very passionate about our thoughts regarding diet. Let's all just remember to be respectful of each other. Thanks!!!!
Tabitha (Tab)

100mg Azathioprine, 2 Fibercon, Colazal-6 a day, Acidopholis Pearls, Prilosec OTC

http://www.healingwell.com/donate
Co-Moderator UC Forum


Probiotic
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Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 2832
   Posted 11/18/2007 8:20 PM (GMT -7)   
Very good points, Princesa, about the SCD. Even though I personally feel that the SCD has some minor flaws- in particular its over-allowance of some very high carb foods cush as honey, fruit and almond flour (though these are supposed to be avoided initially), it serves as a good starting point from which to eliminate foods that feed pathogenic bacteria. As for the science of supplementing probiotics with resistant starches i.e. prebiotics such as inulin, that can be a crxp shoot. Some people tolerate inulin and prebiotics but others don't. I believe it was Horus who pointed out that most common inulins are mostly short chain and can feed pathogens, for example. Regardless of what one views as the optimal diet, one thing is clear: diet can have a big effect on the microflora in our guts, and the resulting bacterial ecology is now acknowledged to be a big player (even if not the primary cause) of IBD. Ultimately it is up to us as individuals to do some trial and error though.
Pancolitis dx'd 1986, full med-free remission 88-97
Flaring or simmering ever since
10 20 17.5 15 12.5 mg pred, 100 mg Imuran
Probiotics (Primal Defense and others), TSO
Turmeric/circumin, fish oil, many vits/minerals
Lower-carb version of Specific Carb Diet (SCD)
 
 
 


jujub
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10405
   Posted 11/18/2007 8:27 PM (GMT -7)   
I think it's a mistake to say someone absolutely can't eat certain things if they have UC. Each of us is different, and tolerates different things. If it works for you, that's great, but that doesn't mean it will work for everyone. For instance, I have no problem with dairy products, but I can't eat high-fiber foods at all. Fried foods are hard on anyone's GI tract, but we notice it more and it tends to panic us, where a person with a "normal" colon would just think, "hey, I ate something that disagreed with me" and be over it in a couple of days.

I respect whatever works for anyone else, but don't assume it will work for me or the rest of the world just because it works for you.
Judy
 
Moderate to severe left-sided UC diagnosed 2001.
 
Current meds are Colazal, Azathioprine and Remicade. Completely off steroids for more than a year now! In remission since April, 2006. Remicade has been my wonder drug.
 
Now tapering Azathioprine, please pray for me.
 
"If you spend your time second-guessing your past decisions, you'll never have time to enjoy today."


princesa
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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 2198
   Posted 11/19/2007 8:18 AM (GMT -7)   
Judilyn said...
I respect whatever works for anyone else, but don't assume it will work for me or the rest of the world just because it works for you.

And the flip side of that is don't assume something won't work for other sufferers just because it didn't work for you. The point of this forum is for us to share experiences and help educate each other about the options that are out there. We're all individuals with different situations. In my experience there is no magic bullet or quick answer. We all have to go through a period of personal trial and error and a cyclical healing path.
Diagnosed with ulcerative colitis spring 1999
 
Therapeutic dose sulfasalazine, back on a pred taper for first flare in years. Down to 10 mg and feeling much better.
Probiotics, l-glutamine and fish oil caps. George's aloe vera juice and Mucosaheal.
 
 


Probiotic
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 2832
   Posted 11/19/2007 9:22 AM (GMT -7)   
This is not alluding to Judilyn's reasoned and valid points at all, but rather some other posts that can get hot and heavy when someone suggests a certain diet such as the SCD: I've never understood the degree of hostility sometimes shown to the idea that perhaps diet can be a significant factor in IBD, merely on account of the official, medical party line (and that of the CCFA) that it is purely a personal thing, i.e. that because there is no systemic evidence that is "approved" by the medical authorities, therefore it must be baloney. I am all in favor of science-based evidence, but the medical authorities have enormous inertia, and can lag years, sometimes decades, behind the times before they give their blessing to new developments- time many of us do not have to play around with.

The classic example is probiotics. Look back 20, 30 years and you will see that it was considered nonsense and witch-doctor medicine. Yet now I see entire issues of gastroenterological journals devoted to the topic of probiotics and IBD. I totally agree that no single diet should be assumed gospel, and must be approached with caution, but it is certainly worth looking into and, if it seems safe enough, trying it out for a few weeks by those who either don't respond to (or are allergic to) the common IBD meds, or want to minimize their use (certainly a laudable goal for some drugs like pred).
Pancolitis dx'd 1986, full med-free remission 88-97
Flaring or simmering ever since
10 20 17.5 15 12.5 mg pred, 100 mg Imuran
Probiotics (Primal Defense and others), TSO
Turmeric/circumin, fish oil, many vits/minerals
Lower-carb version of Specific Carb Diet (SCD)
 
 
 

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