Question about heart attack

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keios
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 13
   Posted 10/6/2009 8:34 AM (GMT -7)   
Is it true that if one person is having a heart attack he also has high blood pressure? Im just curious.

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 10/6/2009 9:27 AM (GMT -7)   
In a heart attack your heart is working less, not more, so your blood pressure would actually drop. In fact, low blood pressure can be a symptom of heart attack, as well as an abnormally low heart rate (bradycardia), problems with heart valves, and heart failure. These are conditions in which your heart may not be able to circulate enough blood to meet your body's needs. As a result, many folks having a heart attack may feel dizzy or breathless.

So, no, your blood pressure does not go up during a heart attack. It typically goes down.

Take care,

Kitt

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 10/7/2009 7:23 AM (GMT -7)   
Common signs and symptoms of a heart attack include:

Pressure, fullness or a squeezing pain in the center of your chest that lasts for more than a few minutes
Pain extending beyond your chest to your shoulder, arm, back, or even to your teeth and jaw
Increasing episodes of chest pain
Prolonged pain in the upper abdomen
Shortness of breath
Sweating
Impending sense of doom
Fainting
Nausea and vomiting
Signs and symptoms of a heart attack in women may be different or less noticeable than heart attack symptoms in men. In addition to the symptoms above, heart attack symptoms in women can include:

Abdominal pain or "heartburn"
Clammy skin
Lightheadedness or dizziness

Unusual or unexplained fatigue

Not all people who have heart attacks experience the same ones or experience them to the same degree. Many heart attacks aren't as dramatic as the ones you've seen on TV. Some people have no symptoms at all. Still, the more signs and symptoms you have, the greater the likelihood that you may be having a heart attack.

A heart attack can occur anytime — at work or play, while you're resting, or while you're in motion. Some heart attacks strike suddenly, but many people who experience a heart attack have warning signs and symptoms hours, days or weeks in advance. The earliest predictor of an attack may be recurrent chest pain (angina) that's triggered by exertion and relieved by rest. Angina is caused by temporary, insufficient blood flow to the heart, also known as "cardiac ischemia." reference: Mayo Staff

Don't "tough out" the symptoms of a heart attack, such as pressure or pain in your chest, for more than five minutes. Call 911 or other emergency medical services for help. If you don't have access to emergency medical services, have someone drive you to the nearest hospital, such as a neighbor or friend. Drive yourself only as a last resort, if there are absolutely no other options. Driving yourself puts you and others at risk if your condition suddenly worsens.

~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety, Osteoarthritis,
GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."

Post Edited (stkitt) : 9/1/2013 12:36:38 PM (GMT-6)


stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 10/8/2009 3:29 AM (GMT -7)   
A heart attack generally causes uneasiness or ache in the middle of chest. The ache may come on swiftly, or now and then it may begin gradually, developing in intensity in a matter of minutes. It may feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness, heaviness or tightness. The pain has been depicted by patients as: 'like an elephant sitting on my chest', 'like a red hot poker in the centre of my chest' or 'like a steel band tightening around my chest'. The ache might be mild, severe or even moderate.
 
Please remember I am not a physician.
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety, Osteoarthritis,
GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."

Post Edited (stkitt) : 9/1/2013 12:37:55 PM (GMT-6)


keios
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 13
   Posted 10/8/2009 4:22 AM (GMT -7)   
oh okay thanks... i know but still you give us lots of very useful info so it doesnt matter if your a physician or not smilewinkgrin so the ache starts in the middle of the chest or the place where your heart is located am i correct? wink

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 10/8/2009 5:33 AM (GMT -7)   
keios,

To the best of my knowledge, yes most heart attacks follow this scenario but there is always the exception.......so when in doubt do get checked out. It is always better to error on the safe side.

Blessings,

Kitt

keios
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 13
   Posted 10/8/2009 5:52 AM (GMT -7)   
you're the best kitt. does a heart attack start without chest pain? by the way, im asking these questions because we have a family history of being hypertensive. better be knowledgeable about heart conditions than sorry. :D

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 10/8/2009 4:40 PM (GMT -7)   
Silent heart Attacks

There is such a thing as a Silent Heart Attack but please don't let this information alarm you as it is not the normal and if you have concerns do please talk with your physician. Silent heart attacks can happen to anyone, but people most likely to experience silent heart attacks are those that have had a prior heart attack, individuals who have diabetes, women, men and women over the age of 65 and those prone to strokes.

Sometimes the first you time you learn that you have had a silent heart attack is when you have a random EKG for other purposes. But experts do not recommend that people generally be screened for silent heart attacks unless they have other heart-related problems.

I would say the most important thing you can do is to live heart healthy and if you are on medications, do take your meds as prescribed, keep your appointments with your physician and continue to be knowledgable in the signs and sx of a heart attack.
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety, Osteoarthritis,
GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."

Post Edited (stkitt) : 9/1/2013 12:38:59 PM (GMT-6)


keios
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 13
   Posted 10/8/2009 5:10 PM (GMT -7)   
No worries I'm just asking for answers to my queries. Im just curious about it. I'm just 24 and I'm doing the best I can to stay in shape and eat only the best for my health. I also do excercise every morning and lost many pounds since I started. I was just asking. I've read some lines over the internet and some say "Don't think about it, instead think that you just got to stay in shape, exercise everyday and eat healthy in order to be healthy."

Thanks kitt, you're the best and this forum is the best. smilewinkgrin

KopyKat
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 10/9/2009 5:26 AM (GMT -7)   
Maybe not *during the heart attack, but leading up to the heart attack yes.

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:40 AM (GMT -7)   

KopyKat,

You are right in your statement..............

High blood pressure increases the risk of coronary artery disease (also called atherosclerosis).

Coronary artery disease is the buildup of plaque or fatty matter in the walls of the coronary arteries; this buildup leads to narrowing of the arteries over time. The narrowed artery limits or blocks the flow of blood to the heart muscle. The hardened surface of the artery can also encourage the formation of small blood clots.

People with high blood pressure are more likely to develop coronary artery disease because high blood pressure puts added force against the artery walls. Over time, this extra pressure can damage the arteries. These injured arteries are more likely to become narrowed and hardened by fatty deposits.

Damaged arteries cannot deliver enough oxygen to other parts of the body. For this reason, high blood pressure can harm the brain and kidneys. High blood pressure also increases the risk for stroke, congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and blindness.

Thank you for pointing this important point out.

Kind Regards,

Kitt

Horse Girl
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 11/19/2009 8:26 AM (GMT -7)   
rolleyes  1st hand experience of symptoms ....
I had a heart attack at 47 with no past problems & I had always had very low blood pressure.  I decided not to ride horses with my husband one evening just because I had felt 2 small flutters in my chest that day (first ever).  The next morning getting ready for work I started having tight hard pains in my chest that would make me sick but then past until the next wave came.  My husband took me to the ER where I blacked out on the way in.  My symptoms were face & ear pain, chest pain & nausea.  I stayed in ER for 5 hrs because they thought I was having an anxiety attack.  When the last blood work came back I was rushed to another hospital for surgery.  They told me  that I was to young & fit & that most women do not have pain with a heart attack.  Mine hurt like the devil....I kept telling them there was a Donkey sitting on my chest & I was cold and sweaty.  I had one 99% blockage that required a stent and was on my way in 3 days.  Later I became anemic and started blacking out.  After 6 months of being confused and weak my heart dr found a PFO in my heart that had to be closed.  Here it is 16 months later and I'm almost normal again.  And other than a little pain from the PFO closure now & then and not being able to sleep on my left side I feel like a new women.  I also had to get 5 IV's of iron after the PFO closure which helped so much.  I was so weak, my hair was falling out by the handful and I was so confused that it wasn't safe for me to drive.  Cronic anemia can be a very hard thing to live with, I was stupid that's how I felt, I couldn't function.  I had been anemic for over 3 yrs, my iron level had dropped from 9 to 7 then 3 before the IV's.  Still riding horses and happy.....
 

Trog
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 28
   Posted 6/17/2010 1:24 AM (GMT -7)   
I am 68 and overweight (BMI 29) but feel perfectly fit.
I have a healthy diet(low fat, no salt, no added sugar, high fibre & plenty of fruit). I have always had low cholesterol in blood tests.
I lead an active life: I hike, mountain bike and swim regularly.
However, I recently had a check up prior to an operation for prostate cancer. The ECG was abnormal and the anaethetist was called to check whether the operation could go ahead.
A subsequent ECG at my GPs surgery showed that I had had a heart attack. This was a great shock to me as I have not had any symptoms at all.
I do not know when the heart attack occured so I might have been following my sporting pursuits with a damaged heart.
This knowledge has made me very nervous about continuing my activities especially since I live on my own.
I am seeking further tests and medical advice to fully understand how badly damaged my heart is and what I should do about it.
How can I have had a heart attack that has badly damaged my heart with me knowing anything about it and having no symptom during or after the attack?

Trog

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 6/17/2010 8:22 AM (GMT -7)   
Trog,

Although many people think of a heart attack as a painful, sometimes fatal event, there are some heart attacks that go entirely unnoticed.

Undiagnosed, or "silent," heart attacks affect nearly 200,000 people in the United States annually. As many as 40 to 60 percent of all heart attacks are unrecognized, studies show.

Symptoms of a silent heart attack are often present but unrecognized. They can be very mild, but pinpointed with careful history taking by your physician. Episodes of mild indigestion, dizziness, weakness, sweating and sudden fatigue may be related to unrecognized heart attack. For others, especially diabetics, there may be no symptoms at all.

My best advice would be to follow up with a cardiologist and if you need further testing do consider it.

You are not alone with this dx so now that your know you have had a heart attack in the past make it a habit to get regular check ups and become familiar with all the sx of a heart attack.

Take care,

Kitt

CeeJay27
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 7/20/2010 8:48 AM (GMT -7)   
There is great information here. I am 48 year old male with high cholesterol that was discovered 8 years ago. I tried to control with diet and exercise, but couldn't since it is hereditary in my case. I am now on Crestor. Started with 20mg, now down to 10 mg.

Just spoke with my doc, we're going to get an EKG done to be safe.

I am not overweight, in fact, probably underweight, and always have been throughout my life. I'm 5'4", 110 lbs.

I suspect my arteries are getting clogged up. I want to try other natural remedies like Niacin, Pectin etc, but I am not sure about doing it while on Crestor.

Any feedback from anyone?

In the mean time, I'll get more tests done and post my findings.

Thanks.

cindy001
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 53
   Posted 9/8/2010 11:08 PM (GMT -7)   
my mum has increased palpatations as well as she cant see when she gets this pain in her chest and she begins to feel hot and she sweats.have taken her to our gp and her says that its just angina and he gave her angised.he did not even do a ecg.in 1 day she took at least 7.when i asked my gp he said if it relieves the pain i must just give it to her.she does not take the angised now but she still having a problem with her heart.do you think i should be concerned and take her to the nearest hospital.she however takes isosbinade dintrate 2 times a day.she also has esld.what must i do?please help

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 9/9/2010 2:27 PM (GMT -7)   
cindy,
 
It feels to me like your Mom should get a second opinion re her chest pain.  You stated the Dr. gave your Mom "angised" -  I am not sure what you are referring to.  Also I am concerned your Mom did not have an ECG prior to prescribing medications.
 
Kindly,
Kitt
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety/Panic, Osteoarthritis, GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.
www.healingwell.com

"If you can't change the world, change your world"

heartbear
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 10/11/2010 11:27 AM (GMT -7)   
No kidding heart issues are very serious why wouldn't they do more tests? Does she have insurance? I know that shouldnt matter but it really does. You have to ask questions and give the doctors any information that you have, even those little things that might not seem like much can be. Better to be safe than sorry.

rocky leonard
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 2/12/2011 4:41 PM (GMT -7)   
I would like to include this about heart pain. First I am a 48 year old man, I had pain in my back, just under my shoulder blade in the area of my armpit, but closer to the middle. I had more female heart disease symptoms than male, so when you research it on the net, look at male and female symptoms. Here is a link I wrote about my heart bypass and all the issues i had from pain, symptoms and what the doctors did, and failed to do. http://www.smart-heart-living.com/my-quadruple-heart-bypass-experience.html. Everyone should read this. It is what I believe to be as informative as I could make it. I was told I had anxiety, and if it wasn't for my instance, I'D BE DEAD.. I am on a mission now to inform any and all people who seek help with answers. I had symptoms that were very different than what I could find online, and through every doctor. Best wishes and good luck to all of you. Feel free to ask me anything, or contact me any way you would like. If I can help, I'll be more than happy. It's always a good thing to read someone's story, it really help me out.

Rocky

Dazzler123
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/15/2011 11:27 AM (GMT -7)   
I am 43 and have had two heart attacks. The first was more serious. I was sweating profusely, my BP dropped to 70/30 and I collapsed (passed out), My wife is a nurse and quickly raised my legs up high, I think she saved my life. The chest pain then was unbearable, spreading to both arms( where I just didn't know what to do with them- no place or position was confortable, especially in the ambulance.) I had two stents in my RCA and was lucky to live. 6 weeks later and completely out of the blue, as I felt great, I had another one. Same chest pain - really bad, but I walked out of my house this time. This attack did not show on an ECG!! but was discovered 12 hours later when my blood troponin levels came back. I knew I had another one though, I kept telling them. You can't mistake it. That second one cost me some heart tissue as they didnt open the blockage in my LAD as it was too late ( as they didn't have the evidence to say I was having one) You can save any damaged heart muscle if they do an angioplasty before 250 minutes have elapsed since the symptoms started. If blood flow is replenished to the starved area within this time the damage can be minimal - it is quite amazing what they can do.
That was the case with my first one, not the second.
I have low BP, am not overweight, have always been fit, never been a drinker and I stopped smoking after my first MI ( the fags got the blame even though I only smoked 10 a day) The second one I was risk factor free!! The cardiologist said it was bad luck. Thas why I dont do the lottery!! My message is this. If you feel strange or have chest pain that will not go, go to your nearest A and E asap. Most heart attack patients in hospital don't go straight away and lose their heart muscle tissue as intervention strategies are too late. The earlier you go the more chance you can make a total recovery. Dont go to your GP and get given tablets for indigestion like me!! Good luck

cat1962
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 8/28/2011 10:10 AM (GMT -7)   
ROCKY...that's what my husband felt today....The pressure/pain in his shoulder blades in his back. He said it went from his chest to his back. Was that like yours? He is stubborn...blew it off". He is 46. Both of his parents (ages 65 and 71) died of heart attacks...) he won't let me take him to the ER.)

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 4/6/2012 8:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Today we have a new member who shared their experience - massive heart attack !  I am taking this opportunity to post a link to all:
 
This is a must read and you may print the info and share it with others.
 
Seconds Count
 
http://www.scai.org/SecondsCount/Resources/Detail.aspx?cid=6cdaa128-5d23-4125-bcf7-9ad03af2c024
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety, Osteoarthritis,
GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.

www.healingwell.com

"Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass...
It's about learning how to dance in the rain."~ Vivian Greene
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