Confused with echo readings.

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PALMY
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2003
Total Posts : 268
   Posted 12/26/2013 4:16 PM (GMT -6)   
I had a Echo done and the report said moderate pulmonary hypertension, I went to a cardio who said the numbers did not add up and retested me. He said mild pulmonary hypertension.

This report says normal inferior vena cava: estimated right atrial pressure 0-5 mmHg-mild pulmonary hypertension. I am not sure what numbers they use to access PH but my right ventricle systolic pressure was 43.1 this test, the 1 st it was 53.1.

I am having a echo done next month, 2 1/2 years after the last one.

Is this a real concern?

Palmy

stkitt
Elite Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 12/28/2013 2:27 PM (GMT -6)   
Palmy,
 
I do not read Echos nor do I interpret the numbers...........I would encourage you to make a list of your questions to ask your cardiologist.
 
HealingWell cannot take the place of your medical professional.  I do hope your outcome is good.
 
Kindly,
Kitt
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety, Osteoarthritis,
GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."

PALMY
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2003
Total Posts : 268
   Posted 1/17/2014 5:46 PM (GMT -6)   
I am aware that is not not a dr. answer board, I merely asked a ? and thought possibly someone may have the same problem and know the answer. sorry. I took up the space.

stkitt
Elite Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 1/17/2014 6:47 PM (GMT -6)   
Palmy,
 
You did not just take up space.  I feel bad when people want the answers to their tests and the Drs. fail to get back to them in a timely fashion. All Drs. should make sure they explain in layman's terms the outcome of the test and what it means for the patient including any treatment or follow-up that is needed.
 
I am very confused about the time frame and what test you had when  I saw an old post that you wrote in 2011 with the very same question.
 
Cardiologist are trained in reading and interpreting these tests. I also wonder why 3 years later you are posting this same question.
 
I am sorry I was not able to meet your expectations however I did not want to leave your post with no answer so I left the note  for you.
 
Kindly,
Kitt
 
 
 
 
 
 
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety/Panic
and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."

PALMY
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2003
Total Posts : 268
   Posted 1/17/2014 7:10 PM (GMT -6)   
That was a different ?. I did a search about PH and other echo ?/ on this site and there are many posts with answers.
Fibromyalgia. mofascal pain syndrome, dxed in 1882. Costochondritis, Two herniated cervical discs. Cervical and upper spine arthritis with a large bone spur in mid back. IBS.






Look toward the sun and the shadows will alway fall behind you !!!

stkitt
Elite Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 1/18/2014 11:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Palmy,
 
HW appreciates our members and I did a search last night for you and found this thinking it may be helpful for you.  I am also glad you are using the search feature here in the forum.
 
The left side of the heart is associated with systemic blood pressure, and the right side involves pressures associated with the pulmonary valve, pulmonary artery, and the lungs.  It is accepted any value greater than 40 is in the range of pulmonary hypertension.

In medicine, pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an increase in blood pressure in the pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, or pulmonary capillaries, together known as the lung vasculature, leading to shortness of breath, dizziness, fainting, and other symptoms, all of which are exacerbated by exertion. Pulmonary hypertension can be a severe disease with a markedly decreased exercise tolerance and heart failure.

In order to establish the cause, the physician will generally conduct a thorough medical history. A detailed family history is taken to determine whether the disease might be familial. A history of exposure to cocaine, methamphetamine, alcohol leading to cirrhosis, and smoking leading to emphysema are considered significant.
 
A physical examination is performed to look for typical signs of pulmonary hypertension, including a loud P2 (pulmonic valve closure sound),  jugular venous distension, pedal edema, ascites, hepatojugular reflux, clubbing etc. Evidence of tricuspid insufficiency (pulmonary valve regurgitation/stenosis) is also sought and, if present, is consistent with the presence of pulmonary hypertension.
 
The pulmonary artery systolic pressures derived from a transthoracic echocardiogram are estimates based on the Bernoulli equation which uses with peak velocity from tricuspid regurgitation to estimate right ventricular systolic pressure.  Normal values are less than 30 mmHg at rest.  The point is that these are derived values and may vary as much as 5 to 10 points from examination to examination. 
 
I do not have PH however, I do hope another member will be along to help answer your question.
 
Meanwhile I wish you a very pleasant week-end and look forward to getting to know you better.
 
Kindly,
Kitt

 
 
 
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety/Panic
and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."

PALMY
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2003
Total Posts : 268
   Posted 1/18/2014 12:03 PM (GMT -6)   
my echo that was done 2 weeks ago was not showing p h but now is showing mild to moderate aortic regurg I am wondering how good of a test this is. also last echo showed mild to moderate tricuspid regurg now it is mild


thanks for your help..

stkitt
Elite Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 1/18/2014 2:11 PM (GMT -6)   
Two-dimensional echocardiography with Doppler flow studies is the most useful imaging modality in patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension. If pulmonary hypertension is present, further evaluation may include assessment of oxygenation, pulmonary function testing, high-resolution computed tomography of the chest, ventilation-perfusion lung scanning and cardiac catheterization.
 
After discussion with your Dr. you may want to set up some pulmonary function studies.
 
Kindly,
Kitt
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety/Panic
and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."
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