SVT, so scared and hopeless...

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idk229
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2013
Total Posts : 50
   Posted 2/17/2014 7:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello everyone,
My name is John and I am 27 years old. I was diagnosed with SVT today and I feel horrible... In the past year I had : 24 hour holter monitor, 20 ekg's , echo, 2 stress tests, x-rays, and recently a 30 day event monitor that I am currently wearing and caught one episode. Also lots and lots of blood works done. I am a smoker since I was 18 years old, never drank any alcohol or did any drugs, but I do not exercise as much. I am 5' 9" and 138 pounds and have lost a lot of weight since all that started. I was originally a year ago diagnosed with GAD but those episodes started last September.
After I would eat, my heart rate would go up sometimes to 150 or so. I had the tests done back then and after a couple of months my mind relaxed and the episodes stopped. Now in january, one day after eating the same thing happened. Crazy heart rate and my blood pressure was up the sky. I wore an event monitor after several doctor visits and trips to the er. Yesterday it was on of the worst ones... I had the monitor on and an hour after I ate the whole thing started. It went on for 15 minutes and after lots of water it calmed down. I went to the doctor today that told me that the last night recording was at 182!! He said that I have SVT, even though he did not seem 100% certain for a second. The episode of 182 said sinus tachycardia with pacs.

With all that, for the past month I have been eating only once a day, a couple of sandwiches because most of those episodes come after eating... All this is ruining my life., I do not want to do anything and I am just scared when it will happen again...

I am not sure what to do. The doctor wants me to try calcium blockers and also told me about ablation... I have heard a ton of not successful and weird stories about ablation and even though I consider it, I do not think that I want to do it. There were also recordings in there with my heart rate being at 60 while resting, so I am not sure if the blockers are an option either. I am trying to get a second opinion from another doctor to see what he will think.

I would appreciate any opinions on the matter.

idk229
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2013
Total Posts : 50
   Posted 2/17/2014 7:59 PM (GMT -6)   
The doctor also did not look at the reports of the whole 2 weeks that the monitor recorded, but he only looked at the one from last night and told me that, which makes me doubt him even more....

Thank you,
John
Dx : Gad, Health Anxiety, Panic disorder, Anxiety with somatization, Chronic Gastritis, Gerd

Not on medication, CBT is my personal choice. Do not give up, there is always hope even at times that it does not feel like it.

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 2/18/2014 2:04 PM (GMT -6)   
I am sorry to hear of your problems and I agree with you; your Dr. seems to be a bit indifferent.  I would strongly encourage you to seek out a second opinion.
 
Also, keep in mind much of what you read in the forums are stories from patients that have had issues or complications from ablations.  People that zoom right through the procedure and have no questions rarely join a forum to post how great they have felt after ablation.
 
Each person is unique and will respond in their own way to any procedure or surgery.  Try to keep an open mind and do all your data gathering before you make an informed decision if the procedure would be good for you.
 
Kindly,
Kitt 
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety/Panic
and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.



"She Stood in the Storm & When the Wind Did Not Blow Her Away, She Adjusted Her Sails."

JungRulz
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2014
Total Posts : 394
   Posted 2/18/2014 2:50 PM (GMT -6)   
The threshold of below 60 Beats Per Minute as being Bradycardia is of little concern to the several cardiologists I have seen over the years. Most are happy with a resting or sleeping pulse much lower than that, but would begin to assess if dizziness, say on rising, or feeling lightheaded, is being experienced. If you wore a Holter Monitor and recorded 24 hours of activity and did not catch an event, it apparently isn't, at least at that time, daily.

You mention SVT (I've experienced PSVT, scary, the Holters never caught it, I had to wear an event monitor. I was relieved when I phoned in the event and the tech, in a rather bored voice, said "oh, you had a little PSVT" and didn't tell me to go to the hospital). There is a disorder known as Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia. See the following link for some questions and comments that appear to be relevant to your situation.

www.medhelp.org/posts/Heart-Disease/Tachy-after-eating/show/250081

idk229
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2013
Total Posts : 50
   Posted 2/18/2014 5:23 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you so much both for your responses!!!!! I went today and I saw one of the best cardiologists in the doc metro area. He looked all the strips from the event monitor(around 27 pages) and told me that he cannot see any PSVT or SVT and that he is not convinced that this is what I have... He told me to keep on wearing the monitor and report back to him after the whole month is done, so that he is able to tell me what is going on. I am so confused now, the one doctor says the one thing and the other doctor says something else... The only soupy that I have is, if the event monitor says sinus tachycardia with pacs, how can it be PSVT or SVT? I know that I sound like a mad person, but I am so desperate and confused and don't know what to do... I have been reading about all those stories that people had to go to the er and get the Iv shot and how much it hurts and stops your heart from working for a bit and it makes me even more scared... 😭

JungRulz
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2014
Total Posts : 394
   Posted 2/18/2014 7:11 PM (GMT -6)   
The following is a heavily edited excerpt from a site that pertains to EKG interpretation. The term dysrhythmia is what we call arrhythmia. Technically speaking, arrhythmia would mean "no or non rhythm". Dys would mean abnormal rhythm. In any case, where you see dysrhythmia think arrhythmia.

Obviously, even among professionals, there is some confusion about the specific terminology. The following is not meant for you to really learn much from, other than the fact that it shows there is confusion on the issue. If you're going to a cardiologist with the reputation you mentioned, you should be reassured.

Everything beyond this point is the excerpt:

"While we are discussing this, we should be clear about our terminology. Sinus tach is one of the Supraventricular Tachycardias. "SVT" is an umbrella term that represents a group of tachydysrythmias that originate above the ventricles.

One of the issues that’s come to light is the fact that “SVT” is seemingly often taught as a “dysrhythmia” itself rather than what it really is: a group of dysrhythmias.

What are we even taught about SVT?

Generally speaking these days, when students are taught SVT they are taught that a narrow tachycardia faster than 150 or 160 is "SVT". Simple as that.

How do we differentiate sinus tach from SVT?

While on the subject, where did the rate limit of 150 or 160 come from?

There does not seem to be any research I can find that even suggests that these numbers can be used to differentiate ST from other SVTs.

In fact, I could not find any research that demonstrates that absolute rate plays any part in differentiating ST from other SVTs."

idk229
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2013
Total Posts : 50
   Posted 2/18/2014 7:44 PM (GMT -6)   
Wow, believe it or not, while researching today I found this whole article and read all of it, lol. I know, it is really surprising to see, my only issue is, when a doctor says something(like the first cardio) and starts by prescribing pills, shouldn't he be a little bit more careful and sure on what the condition might be? There are people out there(myself included) that will be devastated by news like those even though it might supposedly be not serious...
Dx : Gad, Health Anxiety, Panic disorder, Anxiety with somatization, Chronic Gastritis, Gerd

Not on medication, CBT is my personal choice. Do not give up, there is always hope even at times that it does not feel like it.

JungRulz
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2014
Total Posts : 394
   Posted 2/19/2014 3:21 AM (GMT -6)   
Most Beta blockers and Calcium Channel Blockers have an excellent safety record, are well tolerated, and can be very effective in reducing heart rates and symptoms. If your doctor had suggested a Class I anti-arrhythmic drug, he/she may have been rash, but Calcium Channel or Beta Blockers are very common medications with a wide range of applicability.

/en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiarrhythmic_agent

When doctors consider prescribing a Class I anti-arrhythmic drug, and some others that are not Class I, they have to be wary not to make the rhythm worse, as some of these more potent medications can have proarrhythmic aspects to them and have to be closely monitored.
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