Has anyone experienced PAD = Peripheral artery disease

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PA_grandma
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Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 3667
   Posted 5/26/2015 7:16 AM (GMT -6)   
Have you had, or know someone...who has Peripheral artery disease?

I have not been 'diagnosed' yet...but with some research fear this is my condition. Right leg is getting worse every day, and shortly I doubt I'll be able to walk.

My cardiac appointment is two months away. Can I wait this long?

~ Joyce

Basia1
New Member


Date Joined May 2015
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 5/26/2015 9:58 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi, i say your question and wanted to make you aware of lifestyle choices, etc and how this can affect PAD. I was told about 10 years ago that I will most likely develop PAD in right leg. I was young then, early 40s. It has started to bother me more so I am going to try the supplements, and follow these suggestions. I copied this from a Drs website who treats PAD holistically. If you would like more info please let me know. :)

I would call the Drs office and tell them your concerns. Ask them if they can see you sooner. I always ask for them to put me on the list to call if someone cancels, that way sometimes I can get in sooner.

Only you know how you feel and if your walking is getting worse or not. If you feel 2 months is to long see, if you can find another Dr who can see you sooner. Remember though unless the Dr is a Functional Dr they will just give you drugs to control or mask the symptoms you are having and not address what is causing the PAD and how to cure it. I hope the following is helpful to you also.

Like heart disease and diabetes, successful treatment of PAD requires a multi-pronged approach that includes:

Step 1: Address Underlying Risk Factors

Fortunately, most of the risk factors for PAD are within your control. They include:

Diabetes
Smoking
High blood pressure
Nutritional deficiencies
Elevations in blood lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocysteine
Step 2: Change Your Lifestyle

Begin by cleaning up your diet. A heart-healthy diet should include:

Plenty of high-fiber, low-glycemic carbohydrates with lots of vegetables, beans and legumes
Adequate protein from poultry, oily fish (especially salmon), egg whites, nuts and occasional lean meat
A little fruit (one or two pieces per day)
Modest amounts of olive and other unprocessed oils
Unsweetened tea and modest amounts of wine
Next, try to exercise. One of the most troubling aspects of PAD is its toll on physical activity. Intermittent claudication can make walking across the street a major ordeal and climbing stairs a nightmare.

But according to a 2009 study published in JAMA, increasing your activity level is exactly what you should be doing.

Researchers from Northwestern University enrolled 156 patients who had PAD, with or without leg pain, in a six-month, three-times-a-week program of supervised treadmill or resistance exercise. When participants were retested at the study’s conclusion, both groups—but particularly the treadmill exercisers—were able to walk longer distances. They also reported better quality of life.

Step 3: Take Targeted Supplements

Deficiencies of vitamins A, C and E increase risk of PAD, and a low blood level of vitamin D was shown to raise risk by 80 percent. That’s why everyone, regardless of health status, should take an antioxidant-rich multivitamin and mineral supplement every day.

There are also several other supplements that target the underlying issues associated with PAD. The ones I recommend to my patients include:

Ginkgo biloba, an herb with mild blood-thinning effects that is a popular PAD therapy in Europe. In a recent German study, researchers gave patients with moderate PAD and intermittent claudication 40 mg ginkgo supplements three times a day for 24 weeks, and their walking performance significantly increased. I recommend taking 120 mg of ginkgo per day, in divided doses. Caution: Do not take ginkgo if you are on Coumadin (warfarin).

Propionyl-L-carnitine, an amino acid. In a year-long clinical trial, this supplement improved walking distance in patients with relatively severe PAD by 44 percent compared to placebo. I suggest taking 2,000 mg of propionyl-L-carnitine daily, in divided doses.

Inositol hexaniacinate, a form of vitamin B3 and no-flush cousin of niacin, has also been shown to extend the distance PAD sufferers can walk prior to the onset of debilitating pain. I recommend taking 4,000 mg of inositol hexaniacinate per day, in divided doses.
I suggest trying these one at a time and giving each a two- or three-month trial until you find what works for you. Other supplements you may want to consider are:

A special seaweed extract (Seanol) and nattokinase (an enzyme present in the Japanese fermented food natto), both of which help normalize fibrinogen and other clotting factors in the blood. This is important because the poor blood flow to the extremities associated with PAD increases the risk of blood clots, which can lodge in narrowed arteries and cause serious complications, including death. These supplements also improve overall circulation. Use as directed. Caution: Do not take nattokinase if you are on Coumadin (warfarin).

Vitamin K2 is active in the bones and soft tissues, escorting calcium into the bones where it belongs and out of the arteries and other soft tissues. When you have deficiencies in vitamin K2, calcium can build up in and contribute to hardening of the arteries. Dutch researchers have discovered very strong links between vitamin K intake, arterial calcification and cardiovascular death. I recommend taking 100–150 mg of vitamin K2 (the MK-7 form) daily. Caution: Do not take vitamin K if you are on Coumadin (warfarin).

Fish oil has anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and cardio-protective effects, which is why I recommend taking 2–5 g of a high-quality product daily.
Step 4: Use Noninvasive Treatments for Extra Support

Again, email me if you want more info about this particular Dr. I would post it here but I do not think they allow that.

PA_grandma
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 3667
   Posted 5/26/2015 10:56 AM (GMT -6)   
Basia...you went to a lot of trouble, thank you.

Will take some time to 'absorb' it all...and get back to you.
~ Joyce

Basia1
New Member


Date Joined May 2015
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 5/26/2015 11:40 AM (GMT -6)   
You are welcome. I hope it helps.
Remember, god put plants on the earth to help us. I always look into holistic treatments for any illnesses. Sometimes drugs are definitely needed but many times with an open mind and the willingness to search, you can find many cures from herbs. Earth clinic dot com is also a great place to do research.
Good luck and let me know if I can help. :)

theHTreturns...
Elite Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 20279
   Posted 5/26/2015 4:14 PM (GMT -6)   
good stuff basia. joyce, as suggested some meds may be required to aid this. yeah go fully prepared. awesome stuff basia.
THE HAPPY TURTLE.

my conditions are mere aspects of me, they do not define me.
'

PA_grandma
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 3667
   Posted 5/27/2015 12:49 PM (GMT -6)   
Basia and Jamie...thanks both of you.

The leg is looking (and feeling) worse. Even pain without activity.

I have a new appointment with my cardiologist for this Friday at 4:00.
Will fill you in then on the results.

~ Joyce

LoveMyBrittanys
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2015
Total Posts : 13
   Posted 6/20/2015 7:45 PM (GMT -6)   
I had 7 stents beginning in mid 40's prior to my recent bypass due to PAD. My 1st set of stents were due to my left foot blackish/blue color. No pain. Came very close to losing that leg dr said. 5 yrs later more stents in both legs and pain was becoming more prominent when walking. Legs were heavier and my own mom walked faster than me (lol). It was hard walking distances. In 2013 on a Friday nite I had "the most excruciating" pain in back of left leg. Went to nearby ER and I still remember him 2 this day saying "we can't find anything. If only they had done a ct my vascular surg said. On Monday I did call my vascular surg to let him know what was going on. Get straight to hospital I was told. Well long / short story, I had multiple clots !! And almost lost my leg "again". 😔. After 8 horrible days in hospital I came home to a home health care nurse for a few weeks after my bypass. I would definitely say, let ur heart guide you. If u ever have any of "these" symptoms, biggest not being able to walk a certain distance & pain in back of calf, contact ur doctor for sure. Hope ur doing well...

theHTreturns...
Elite Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 20279
   Posted 6/20/2015 10:46 PM (GMT -6)   
welcome LMB sound info. thx for sharing. keep strong. take care.
THE HAPPY TURTLE.

NOT DEAD YET!!!!! STILL KICKING AND SCREAMING!!!
'
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