Heartburn Solution

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

sinusvictim
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 1/23/2011 9:59 AM (GMT -6)   
Hello Everyone,
 
I actually joined this forum to help combat my allergies and sinus issues but as I was scrolling thru all of the Topics I came across the Gerd/Heartburn topic which is something I have had to deal with as well.
 
I wanted to share with you what has helpd me and that is taking a disgestive enyme capsule before every meal and snack...works everytime. 
 
I use a full spectrum one (not sure if I can say the name brand). It has helped me tremendously!!! I don't go anywhere with out them. I can eat anything I want. I usually take just one before every meal or sanck but sometimes two if it's a heavier meal.  They're totally safe...it's like having mega salads before you eat.  
 
I have been off all percriptions med's since I discovered te enymes...I wean off them slowly until I no longer needed them.
 
Hope this info helps you all!!!
 
Ana wink

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7188
   Posted 1/23/2011 11:38 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Ana,
Welcome to our little corner of Healing Well! What a great idea. I use BEANO when I'm eating gassy foods, which is also an enzyme, so it sounds like a similar thing.

Glad you've found relief! Hope you get some answers to your sinus issues as well. Good luck with that. I've had chronic sinus issues since I was a child. I've pretty much decided that it's something I have to continue to live with. Let me know if you find something that works!

Take care,
Denise

sinusvictim
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 1/23/2011 8:10 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Denise,
 
Not sure what type of enzymes are in Beano but the one I use has all kinds of enzymes that help break down proteins, fat, sugars,carbohydrates, etc...so it's important it's full spectrum in order to relieve your digestive issues.
 
As for my sinsuses, although my sinsuses are chronic I get great relief from using saline rinse every morning...if you never tried it you should...it really helps. My goal now is to wean off my Nasonex which is why I joined this forum.
 
Good Luck to you!
 
Ana wink
 
  

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7188
   Posted 1/23/2011 9:14 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Ana,
I'd love the name of what enzyme product you use.

Yes, I do nasal washings morning and night, and have for years. What a difference they have made. However, I still have persistent postnasal drip--I'm sure in part from a very deviated septum.

I used to use Flonase, then my allergist switched me to an steroid inhaler (40 mcg/Qvar) with a baby nipple attached (the end cut off) so it can be sprayed into the nose. During the late fall and winter months I went off it without a problem, but eventually I started having symptoms again, and since my sinuses trigger asthma, I started taking it again. I will go off intermittently, whenever I can.

Take care,
Denise

Ag10
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 20
   Posted 1/23/2011 9:38 PM (GMT -6)   
I'd love the name of the enzyme too!

Cecelia
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 60
   Posted 1/24/2011 12:39 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Sinus victim -
So glad other people are also discovering digestive enzymes!
i have too little stomach acid (found it out when omeprazole made me 100% worse .had a lot phlegm, reflux from stomach, so bad it also went into my sinusses and down into my lungs ....), did research and found the tip to use these, and found out that these capsules are miracle workers!  I also use a brand which contains the whole spectrum including Bromelain.  My husband hasnt got major problems, but belches very loudly at times, and when he uses these enzymes the belching disappears completely. One forgets that although we were taught to eat all our veges as they are good for us ... we destroy all the enzymes during the cooking process.
 
During my wanderings on the internet I found advertisements for digestive enzymes, so you're bound to find a few.
so good luck,
Cecelia
PS, Last week during a check-up visit to my dr, I realised doctors only know about drugs, nothing about enzymes, etc.   I found out about enzymes on my own, after research, and as it works so well, and the medical aid pays for same, I asked my doctor to give me a prescription for enzymes, and he was completely mystified - wasnt even aware of these enzymes or that the medical aids will pay for same!!

Post Edited (Cecelia) : 1/23/2011 11:42:01 PM (GMT-7)


sinusvictim
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 1/24/2011 9:10 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Guys,
 
I use Udo's Choice - Ultimate Digestive Enzyme. There are a lot of other brands out there in the market...just make sure it's a trustworthy reputable brand name.
 
When I started I took the enymes for a couple of days while still taking the prescription pill then I slowly cut a little peice off the prescription pill  and continued taking the enymes...after a few weeks I was down to nothing of the precription pill. It has been at least 4 years now and I've never had to go back to meds. But be sure to be consistant with the enzymes.
 
Cecelia: Just like you I too found enzymes while surfing the internet...thank goodness...they saved me.
 
Good Luck girls!!!
 
Ana  wink    

Markie-D
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 1/24/2011 2:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Ana and all

I orderd some Enzymedica, Digest Gold which have Probiotics.
I was also wondering if it was ok to take them with the meds, as i'm on Omeprozole, and after stoping them i had bad rebounds.
So went back on them today, and will ween my self of them. so it seems it's ok to take with meds. :) What syptoms did you have ana, and what meds we're you on? My doctor just says it's best to take the tablets! but i hate the side effects. I'm praying the Enzymes work. i also orderd some DLG to heal me i hope :)

Thanks alot :)
Mark ;)

sinusvictim
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 1/24/2011 7:13 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Mark,
 
I googled the Enzymedica, Digest Gold...sounds like a good product, it's even stronger than the Udo's that I take (I compared the ingedients in both) and the probiotics are a plus and will help you too. 
 
I was diagnosed with GERD about 9 years ago. I was prescribed Ranitidine which I took once a day first thing in the morning then I was upped to 2x per day before breakfast and dinner.  After a few years of that it didn't work for me anymore.  I continued to take them but never felt 100% and I hated the side effects too. 
 
I don't think it will be a problem for you to take the enzymes while taking the Omeprozole but if you're worried about it, just ask the pharmacist at your local pharmacy...my doctor says they're the best people to ask about medications and what can or cannot be taken with them.   
 
Don't rush the weaning off the meds...I just cut a touch off the Ranitidine each day for a week then cut a little more each day for another week, and so on...and I was consistant in taking the enyzmes.
 
Maybe you should hold off taking the DGL to see how the enzymes work for you...you might not have to take the DGL at all if all goes well and it will be one less expense for you...just my opinion!!! 
 
I really hope it works wonders for you!!!
 
Ana :-)

Markie-D
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 1/25/2011 9:43 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi ana

Thanks for the reply :)

I was taking Ranitidine at one point also, i felt so low on them! was not nice.
When they say you was diagnosed GERD! is that a case of to much acid? as I had a scope and they said nothing wrong, you just have to much acid! what kind of syptoms we're you getting? did you have the burning throat also?

And how long does it take for the the enzymes to start to work? and do you still take them.
I was only going to try the DGL to help coat my food pipe and stomach, so it can heal.

Thanks for your help.

Mark :)

+IWillBe
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 48
   Posted 1/25/2011 11:36 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you for the advice, i asked my GI specialist about digestive enzymes and he said they were a waste of time but like someone mentioned, doctors are not aware of alternative medications like enzymes and probiotics.
 
Cecilia: Sometimes i wonder if i have the same problem. I ran out of nexium, which kind of helped. And for over a week ive been taking omeprazole and i have been getting symptoms of acid reflux (i suffer from gastritis) it the first time i have felt the acid go up my esophagus and throat =( could that be a sign that i should stop taking it??

Markie-D
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 16
   Posted 1/25/2011 12:04 PM (GMT -6)   
I noticed i got more burning on the throat whiles on the omeprazole. i ask the pharmacy about going cold turkey, and he said try the gaviscon as this does the same kind of thing.
so i'm going to try this, and if it dont work, back on the pills to ween my self of whiles taking the enzymes. i asked my doctor also.. he just said u get them from food..

but i come across this. might be interesting read for some! i wont show the link, as i'm not to sure i can?

Stomach Acid
The questions on stomach acid were of all kinds mind you, but surprisingly, not one on what I would consider the most important issue: low stomach acid.

Anyway, in this newsletter, we'll cover all aspects:

•Stomach acid and digestion
•Too much stomach acid
•Too little stomach acid
•Stomach acid and proteolytic enzymes
•Stomach acid and probiotics
Stomach acid and digestion
Before we can even talk about stomach acid, we need to spend a little time talking about how it fits in the digestive process. Most people believe that when you eat a meal it drops into a pool of stomach acid, where it's broken down, then goes into the small intestine to have nutrients taken out, and then into the colon to be passed out of the body -- if you're lucky. Not quite.

What nature intended is that you eat enzyme rich foods and chew your food properly. If you did that, the food would enter the stomach laced with digestive enzymes. These enzymes would then "predigest" your food for about an hour -- actually breaking down as much as 75% of your meal.

Only after this period of "pre-digestion" are hydrochloric acid and pepsin introduced. The acid inactivates all of the food-based enzymes, but begins its own function of breaking down what is left of the meal in combination with the acid energized enzyme pepsin. Eventually, this nutrient-rich food concentrate moves on into the small intestine. Once this concentrate enters the small intestine, the acid is neutralized and the pancreas reintroduces digestive enzymes to the process. As digestion is completed, nutrients are passed through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream.

That's what nature intended. Unfortunately, most of us don't live our lives as nature intended!

Processing and cooking destroy enzymes in food. (Any sustained heat of approximately 1180 - 1290 F destroys virtually all enzymes.) This means that, for most of us, the food entering our stomach is severely enzyme deficient. The food then sits there for an hour, like a heavy lump, with very little pre-digestion taking place. This forces the body to produce large amounts of stomach acid in an attempt to overcompensate. In addition to failing in this attempt (much of the meal still enters the small intestine largely undigested), there are two major consequences.

1.Too much stomach acid.
2.Too little stomach acid.
Too much stomach acid
This is obvious. In an attempt to overcompensate for lack of enzymes in the food, the stomach produces an inordinate amount of stomach acid to compensate, leading to acid indigestion. Taking antacids or purple pills doesn't actually solve the problem; it merely eliminates one of the symptoms. Ultimately, though, it passes even more quantities of poorly digested food into the intestinal tract where it leads to gas, bloating, bad digestion, chronic digestive disorders, in addition to blowing out your pancreas, which tries to compensate by producing huge amounts of digestive enzymes for use in the small intestine. All of this is exacerbated by foods and beverages such as alcohol (especially beer), high sugar foods, and caffeinated foods (coffee and tea, etc.) that can actually double acid production.

The simple solution for most people with excess stomach acid is to supplement with digestive enzymes which can digest up to 70% of the meal in the pre-acid phase, thus eliminating the need for large amounts of stomach acid and also taking tremendous stress off the digestive system and the pancreas.

One other factor which may be contributing to the problem is a hiatal hernia, in which part of the stomach can protrude through the diaphragm into the chest cavity allowing food and stomach acid to back up into the esophagus. Combine a hiatal hernia with excess stomach acid and you have the potential for great distress. The standard treatment for severe hiatal hernias is laparoscopic surgery -- with mixed results. Fortunately, there are chiropractic alternatives that can be quite effective.

In either case, dietary changes and supplemental digestive enzymes are likely to produce significant results, without creating problems further down the digestive tract.

Drinking 2-4 ounces of organic, stabilized, aloe vera juice every day can also help soothe irritated tissue in the esophagus and help balance out digestive juices in the stomach.

Too little stomach acid
Follow the logic here for just a moment.

If you spend years forcing your body to massively overproduce stomach acid to compensate for the lack of enzymes in your diet, what do you think the long-term consequences might be in terms of your ability to produce stomach acid?

Bingo!

Eventually, your body's capacity to produce stomach acid begins to fade, with a concomitant loss in your body's ability to sufficiently process food in the stomach. The health consequences can be profound. Low production of stomach acid is quite common and becomes more prevalent with age. By age forty, 40% of the population is affected, and by age sixty, 50%. A person over age 40 who visits a doctor's office has about a 90% probability of having low stomach acid. Consequences can include:

•Poor digestion. Not only is there insufficient stomach acid to break down food, there is insufficient acidity to optimize the digestive enzyme pepsin, which requires a pH of around 2.0. This results in partial digestion of food, leading to gas, bloating, belching, diarrhea/constipation, autoimmune disorders, skin diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and a host of intestinal disorders such as Crohn's and IBS.
•It is estimated that 80% of people with food allergies suffer from some degree of low acid production in the stomach.
•Many vitamins and minerals require proper stomach acid in order to be properly absorbed, including: calcium, iron, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Vitamin B12 in particular requires sufficient stomach acid for proper utilization. Without that acid, severe B12 deficiency can result. (Note: ionic delivery systems can bypass this problem.)
•With low acidity and the presence of undigested food, harmful bacteria are more likely to colonize the stomach and interfere with digestion. Normal levels of stomach acid help to keep the digestive system free of harmful bacteria and parasites.
It's worth noting that symptoms of low acidity include:

•Bloating, belching, and flatulence immediately after meals.
•Indigestion, diarrhea, or constipation.
•Heartburn.
Is it just me, or doesn't this list sound very similar to the symptoms associated with too much stomach acid? In fact, up to 95% of people who think they are suffering from too much stomach acid are actually suffering from the exact opposite condition. The use of antacids and purple pills then become exactly the wrong treatment to use since they exacerbate the underlying condition while temporarily masking the symptoms.

Options
•Supplementing with digestive enzymes to reduce the need for stomach acid -- giving the body a chance to rest and recover its ability to produce sufficient stomach acid.
•Mix one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar with water and a little honey and drink this with each meal. You may gradually increase the vinegar up to 3-4 tablespoons in water if needed.
•Supplementing with betaine hydrochloride (HCL) tablets can also help, but anything beyond minimal doses as found in most health food store supplements should only be administered under the supervision of a health practitioner to avoid damage to the stomach lining.
Stomach acid and proteolytic enzymes
As I mentioned at the top of the newsletter, we received a number of questions on stomach acid in the last 30 days. Most of them had nothing to do with high or low stomach acid, but rather with the effect of stomach acid on supplements. In fact, the bulk of the questions we received were concerned with how stomach acid affects proteolytic enzymes, and they all pretty much ran along the following lines.

Since enzymes are made from proteins and proteolytic enzyme formulas are taken orally:

•How do they survive the digestion of proteins that takes place in the stomach? Wouldn't they be broken down by stomach acid into amino acids?
•If they do make it through the stomach, since they are so large, wouldn't they be unable to pass through the intestinal wall?
Surviving the stomach
Not all proteins (enzymes are proteins) are broken down by stomach acid. Rather than get technical, let me just point out pepsin. Pepsin is an enzyme secreted by the stomach to aid in digesting the proteins in your food. Not only is it NOT broken down by stomach acid, its optimum pH environment is about 2.0 (very, very acidic). Bottom line:

•Although some enzymes such as serapeptase are destroyed by stomach acid, most are not -- just temporarily rendered inactive. (Note: that's one of the reasons I do not use serapeptase in my own proteolytic enzyme formulation.)
•Different enzymes function differently in different pH environments, which is why I formulated my proteolytic enzyme formula, pHi-Zymes™, to function in a wide range of pH's.
Passing through the intestinal wall - absorption
Enzyme absorption absolutely occurs and manifests through two main avenues:

•Pinocytosis
•Peristalsis
Pinocytosis. Enzyme molecules are bound to, and encapsulated, by other substances such as water. Since they are encapsulated, the intestinal wall cannot recognize them as enzymes and thinks they are "water," thus readily passing them through the intestinal wall. Once the enzymes are in the bloodstream they attach to lymphocytes and travel easily throughout the vascular and lymphatic systems.

Peristalsis not only forces food (and enzymes) down through the intestinal tract, it also forces transit through the intestinal wall.

Stomach acid and probiotics
The questions related to probiotics are essentially the same as those for proteolytic enzymes: aren't they broken down and destroyed by stomach acid -- thus requiring special, acid-proof capsules? And the answer, for most probiotics, is absolutely not. (I think this is primarily a marketing pitch for companies selling probiotics in enteric coated capsules, but the logic is flawed.)

The reason we're supposed to take probiotic supplements is to replace the probiotics that we used to get in a wide range of unprocessed fermented foods such as homemade yogurt, sauerkraut, buttermilk, pickled foods, kimchi, real soy sauce, raw vinegar, tempeh, etc. -- foods that are no longer a significant part of our diet. But think about this for a moment. These foods are not enteric coated. How could these foods provide probiotic value if the beneficial bacteria were destroyed by stomach acid? The simple truth is that beneficial bacteria, for the most part, easily survive stomach acid. Also, if you take your probiotic supplements with water on an empty stomach (as we've already discussed), they encounter almost no stomach acid anyway.

Conclusion
The bottom line here is that most people are very confused about the role stomach acid plays in health. Most people:

•Think they have too much, when in fact they have too little.
•Treat the symptom and suppress stomach acid production, ultimately leading to long-term health problems.
•Ultimately lose the capacity to produce sufficient stomach acid as a result of dietary abuse and continual use of medications to suppress the body's ability to produce it.
Don't get into that trap.

•Use digestive enzymes with all your meals.
•Drink aloe vera juice.
•Use probiotic supplements with confidence.
•Use proteolytic enzyme supplements with confidence.
•And, if needed, use apple cider vinegar or betaine hydrochloride supplements to make up for stomach acid insufficiency.

sinusvictim
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 1/25/2011 7:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Mark,
 
I wasn't told I had too much acid, I was told that I had acid reflux (GERD) due to a hiatal hernia (doctor figures I got during my pregancy with my second baby) and that after I ate the gastric juices (but it actually felt like the food) travelled back up from my stomach to my esophagus. I always felt like I had a big lump of food in my chest/troat and chest pains too along with feeling bloated and stomach pains. Sometimes I had burning too! Just nasty stuff!!
 
As I recall, it took a few days when I noticed they were working because I never suffered any side effects as I eliminated the ranitadine. It was quite a smooth transition for me.
 
I don't think doctors really know because enzymes most definitely help digest your food; there's no doubt in my mind. Our body produces enzymes but they deplete as we age (that's why seniors have to choose their food carefully and can't endulge like they used to) and of course our processed diets only makes it worse. And as far as I'm concerned even the healthy of people should take digestives enzmes; i give them to my kids when they've over endulged.
 
They can only help you; not make you worse!
The Disgestive Enzymes have been a life saver for me and I hope they will be for you too!!
 
Good Luck!
Ana  
 

Magaug
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 1/26/2011 5:00 AM (GMT -6)   
May I ask If any one has used Melatonin to treat GERD?
If you google Melatonin and gerd there are some interesting
articles,
Dev.

judy02
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 126
   Posted 1/26/2011 9:39 AM (GMT -6)   
Cecelia said...
Hi Sinus victim -
 
PS, Last week during a check-up visit to my dr, I realised doctors only know about drugs, nothing about enzymes, etc.  
 
They really don't!! :P I mentionned digestive enzymes to my GP once and he asked me what they were??
 
Seriously, considering how common digestive problems are, I do not understand why doctors do not know more about them. I also got zero advice about my diet too.
 
All they seem to do is hand out PPI's constantly...as you can tell, I hate those things!! :P They made my digestion worse, gave me more problems with reflux, and not to mention all the horrible side effects that comes with those things.
 
They really should stop prescribing them so easily. Fortunately my GP is good at listening to his patients, he doesn't force or push people into taking medication if they say it is making them worse. Considering I took 3 different types for over a year, I don't think he could argue that I hadn't given them a chance. I doubt all doctors are as good at listening to their patients though unfortunately.

Cecelia
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 60
   Posted 1/27/2011 7:39 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi everyone -
If you're reading this, you no doubt have digestive headaches. After reading thru many threads, one question kept on popping up in my head - where did it all start for everybody?  I actually tried to study the digestive process -- idea - and then a thought crossed my mind - didnt all our troubles actually start because we didnt have sufficient enzymes to get our digestive systems going, so it failed?   If enzymes are helping me who suffers from too little acid,  and it helps Sinusvictim who had bad heartburn ... could this have been the trigger for all of us?  As I mentioned in an earlier reply ...   we were all told to eat all our veges as it is good for us ... maybe for the minerals ... but all the enzymes were killed in the process of cooking, so unless we eat heaps of the necessary fresh raw stuff containing all the necessary enzymes .. our digestive processes will fail ending up in all the problems we read about every day. mad
So thank goodness we are able to buy digestive enzymes over the counter!!  yeah    Cecelia
PS Now that i can only cope with half a plate of food at a time, I think back to my childhood days when I was forced to eat all my food even though I wasnt hungry ...(How can you leave food on your plate when there are so many hungry children in the world??!!!  ...)  I had to sit, all alone,  at that dining table until I had forced my food down, so I also wonder - didnt that "over eating" maybe already forced too much food into my tiny tummy, damaging the LES??   Anybody else with such childhood memories?
 
PPS:  Have just come across this quote - lets tell all our doctors!!:
 
"Enzymes are required in the same way as spark plugs are required in a motor car engine ..."
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Post Edited (Cecelia) : 1/28/2011 9:31:45 AM (GMT-7)


judy02
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 126
   Posted 1/27/2011 9:01 AM (GMT -6)   
Digestive enzymes so far also haven't really improved things for me :(

Cecelia
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 60
   Posted 1/27/2011 9:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Judy02
How long have you been taking them?   If one capsule (the type I'm taking)with a meal doesnt help,, I am allowed to go up to three, but I have never taken more than two.  I usually take 2 when I have a heavy "meaty" meal,
cecelia

judy02
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 126
   Posted 1/27/2011 12:54 PM (GMT -6)   
I probably took them for about a month, but never took more than one at a time.
 
I don't think I could ever have a 'heavy meaty meal' though, no matter how many enzymes I took, my stomach isn't strong enough for that ;)

Cecelia
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 60
   Posted 1/27/2011 1:37 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Iwillbe
We're all so different, what works with one person, doesnt always work with somebody else.  I have been reading thru different threads, realising different PPI's work for different people.   At the same time I think that natural treatments, like digestive enzymes, will take a while to work for everybody.  I also think it will work whether you suffer from too much or too little acid as enzymes are the first step in digestion.
Our stomachs apparently manufactures its own stomach acid, as well as its own mucus to protect its own linings!!    The way I think:
If the enzymes did not do their work as expected, your stomach may have to manufacture too much acid???   Its worthwhile to research the role enzymes play in the digestion process.   Maybe our doctors should too!!! nono     It has been so many years since most of them have been at university .. and these days all they know about medicines is what the medical reps tell them.   I recently picked up a cholesterol problem - my own dr was away and his locum presribed Crestor ..  which gave me major muscular problems which I am still trying to get rid of.  I was horrified when I googled the dangers of Crestor!!   It seems more people die of side effects of medications than of their original medical problems!
So good luck to all of you out there ...  hopefully natural medications will be of help ..
I'm also trying to do the natural "thing", eating a lot of salads  .. drink a lot of fresh pineapple juice, eat dates and papaja (paw-paw), etc, cutting down on cooked veges.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

portaloo
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2011
Total Posts : 42
   Posted 7/5/2011 11:20 AM (GMT -6)   
Had a fantastic surgeon do my diaphragmatic hernia repair and hiatus repair. Now he and another surgeon told me to eat dry biscuits, very dry, no fat, to mop up the acid before the op. After a few months when I was allowed solid food the surgeon said a small glass of Lambrusco, very small, has enough bubbles to agitate the food and get it moving without being too gassy to cause discomfort.

The dry biscuit at night works well if you have a night problem with reflux, so does sleeping with your upper half elevated to defy the gravity.
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Wednesday, September 19, 2018 11:45 PM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 3,004,970 posts in 329,182 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 161753 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, nguoivotinh1.
261 Guest(s), 2 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
pasayten, suchatravesty