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jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/1/2012 3:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Has anyone ever had a vagotomy and a nissen fundlication

opnwhl4
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 4961
   Posted 11/1/2012 3:53 PM (GMT -6)   
I haven't heard of this. Have you gotten a clear explanation from your surgeon about what this is? I know they need to preserve the vagus nerve as much as possible, but not sure what a vagotomy is.
Even with 3 nissens and an esophagus tear I haven't read anything on my surgical reports of this. I did read where they made sure to preserve the vagus nerve.

Take care,
Bill
opnwhl4
Moderator: GERD/Heartburn
Nissen 6/06 and 5/09
#3 on 8/24/11

Alcie
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 5004
   Posted 11/1/2012 5:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Do you have ulcers? Vagotomy - cutting the vagus nerve - was a way of reducing stomach acid.

I'd get a second opinion.

couchtater
Elite Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 14475
   Posted 11/1/2012 6:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Do you have problems with Ulcers?

Vagotomy is performed when acid production in the stomach can not be reduced by other means. It is used when ulcers in the stomach and duodenum do not respond to medication and changes in diet. It is an appropriate surgery when there are ulcer complications, such as obstruction of digestive flow, bleeding, or perforation. The frequency with which elective vagotomy is performed has decreased in the past 20 years as drugs have become increasingly effective in treating ulcers. However, the number of vagotomies performed in emergency situations has remained about the same.
Vagotomy is often performed in conjunction with other gastrointestinal surgery, such as partial removal of the stomach (antrectomy or subtotal gastrectomy). There are several types of vagotomies. Truncal vagotomy severs the trunk of the vagus nerve as it enters the abdomen. Parietal cell or proximal gastric vagotomy leaves the trunk intact, but severs the branches that go to different parts of the stomach.
Vagotomy is performed under general anesthesia by a surgeon in a hospital. The surgeon makes an incision in the abdomen and locates the vagus nerve. Either the trunk or the branches leading to the stomach are cut. Then the abdominal muscles are sewn back together, and the skin is closed with sutures.
Often, other gastrointestinal surgery is performed at the same time as the vagotomy. Part of the stomach may be removed, for instance. Vagotomy causes a decrease in peristalsis and a change in the emptying patterns of the stomach. To ease this, a pyloroplasty is often performed. This procedure widens the outlet from the stomach to the small intestine.

Aftercare
Patients who have had a vagotomy stay in the hospital for about seven days. For the first three or four days, nasogastric suctioning is required. A tube is inserted through the nose and into the stomach. The stomach contents are then suctioned out. Patients eat a clear liquid diet until the gastrointestinal tract is functioning again. When patients return to a regular diet, spicy and acidic food should be avoided.
It takes about six weeks to fully recover from the surgery. The sutures that close the skin can be removed in seven to ten days. Patients are encouraged to move around soon after the operation to prevent the formation of deep vein blood clots. Pain medication, stool softeners, and antibiotics may be prescribed following the operation.
Risks
As with all surgery, excessive bleeding and infection are possible complications. In addition, the emptying patterns of the stomach are changed. This can lead to dumping syndrome and diarrhea. Dumping syndrome is a condition where shortly after eating, the patient experiences palpitations, sweating, nausea, cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Joy
Lupus, Fibromyalgia, Glaucoma, Asthma, Hypothyriodism, Sleep Apnea, Degenerative Disk and Facet Disease, and Allergies

When life throws you lemons....
Pick them up and throw them right back at them! :))

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/2/2012 5:41 AM (GMT -6)   
yes i,m having this done on december 19th

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7181
   Posted 11/2/2012 7:17 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi jennas,
Did your surgeon/GI doc tell you why you need a vagotomy in addition to the Nissen surgery?
Just wondering about the reasoning behind that decision...
Best wishes,
Denise
GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/4/2012 6:29 AM (GMT -6)   
yes because of so much acid build up in my stomach

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7181
   Posted 11/4/2012 8:43 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi jennas,
Have you gotten a second opinion about whether or not you need a vagotomy?  It's definitely an unusual procedure and is not used as much as it used to be.  Have you had problems with ulcers that have been treated with antibiotics without improvement?
 
From what I've read, it used to be the route doctors took to treat ulcers.  Then they found out that ulcers were actually caused by bacteria.  It sounds as if your stomach makes unusually high amounts of acid, and it isn't being controlled by medication. 
 
Have you researched your surgeon carefully, and gotten a second opinion regarding this decision?  I expect you've worked hard to find the best possible Nissen surgeon, which is the most important thing you can do to ensure a great outcome. 
 
Nissen fundoplication is an art form and takes a lot of practice to get right.  Even the very best surgeon who hasn't done many, many of these procedures is not sufficient.  In a large city, a Nissen surgeon should have done 1000+ procedures, and a smaller city surgeon should have done at least 300+ Nissens.
 
 You've got one chance to have a first Nissen surgery.  Be sure that you've made sure that you've selected your surgeon carefully.  Many of us interviewed more than one surgeon before choosing the one that we felt was most qualified. 
 
It's a big decision, and a hard one.  Be sure to spend the time it takes to be confident that you're making the right one.  We're here as your sounding board, to share our own experiences and provide you with support.
 
Very best wishes,
Denise
GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

"Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists.”

“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”

“Accept - then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”Eckhart Tolle

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/5/2012 6:10 AM (GMT -6)   
I hope i,m making the right decisons w/ this surgery.I did have ulcers and lots of acid,I think i have good surgeon,is this like a majior surgery

NoDoubtLove
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2012
Total Posts : 359
   Posted 11/5/2012 7:53 AM (GMT -6)   
get a second opinion about the vagotomy! I have always been under the understand that you don't mess with your vagus nerve?!

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/5/2012 2:13 PM (GMT -6)   
I had talk to another doctor

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/5/2012 4:30 PM (GMT -6)   
I seen a surgeon he told me the same as the other one that vagotomy they will cut branches so it will slow down acid.I was also told by a doctor just doing Nissan fundlication only prevents acid coming up in throat it does,nt help with acid in stomach.which I have alot of,

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7181
   Posted 11/5/2012 4:34 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi jennas,
You've had a second opinion, then?  What did the other doctor say about it?  Did he/she agree that a vagotomy was the correct route for you?  The Nissen is more common, I think, than the vagotomy, and I can say that you're the first one who I've met on the forum who's having the Nissen/Vagotomy combination surgery.
 
Yes, it is all major surgery.  We're asking questions, because we want to make sure you've asked your surgeon/GI doc enough questions and understand why they're doing that paticular surgery.  It may very well be the best solution to your problem.  Just be sure you understand what it means and how it will affect you after surgery.
We're here to provide support and answer whatever questions we can. Take care!
 
Good luck!
Denise
GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

"Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists.”

“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”

“Accept - then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”Eckhart Tolle

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/5/2012 4:57 PM (GMT -6)   
yes he told me about both and said I would benifit from it.The nissan is more common but when u have alot of acid like mine he said they do both,

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7181
   Posted 11/5/2012 5:27 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Jennas,
If he took the time to explain it to you, and you're comfortable with that explaination, that's what's important. We'll be here to support you through recovery and share our own experiences.
Very best wishes,
Denise
GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

"Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists.”

“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”

“Accept - then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”Eckhart Tolle

couchtater
Elite Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 14475
   Posted 11/5/2012 5:56 PM (GMT -6)   
Good luck in your surgery. I hope your stomach heals very well. :)
Joy
Lupus, Fibromyalgia, Glaucoma, Asthma, Hypothyriodism, Sleep Apnea, Degenerative Disk and Facet Disease, and Allergies

When life throws you lemons....
Pick them up and throw them right back at them! :))

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/7/2012 2:17 PM (GMT -6)   
keep coughing like crazy could it be from acid reflux I take cough medicine nothing seems to help

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7181
   Posted 11/7/2012 3:13 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi jennas,
I also had serious lung issues prior to my Nissen.  I understand how hard it is.  I don't think cough syrup is of much help.  Have you seen a doctor about the cough?  I wonder if an albuterol inhaler would help you.
Good luck!
Denise
GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

"Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists.”

“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”

“Accept - then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”Eckhart Tolle

jennas40
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 11/7/2012 4:36 PM (GMT -6)   
I,LL have to try mine my doctor gave me the cough med she said maybe its the acid reflux,not sure

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7181
   Posted 11/7/2012 4:55 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi jennas,
I do know that reflux cause a cough that has nothing to do with lungs.  The reflux creates a kind of dry cough that is very annoying.  A dear friend of mine has that problem.  I can always hear her coming because she's coughing and clearing her throat. Hopefully you can get feeling better soon!
Take care,
Denise
GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

"Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists.”

“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”

“Accept - then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”Eckhart Tolle
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