Supplements/Vitamins For someone with Reflux,Gastritis and IBS

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iamloco724
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Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 144
   Posted 1/30/2014 10:26 PM (GMT -6)   
I have Reflux,Gastritis and IBS im looking for supplements/herbs/vitamins that can help me because i have all 3 of these things its hard to find things that work for one but wont hurt the other

i have heard of many things that say help ibs but can cause reflux or gastritis problems and vice versa

any help with this would be greatly appreciated because as im sure some of you know it is very frustrating to be in this situation with all 3 of the issues

hateuc
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Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 2354
   Posted 1/31/2014 8:31 AM (GMT -6)   
I have colitis and gastritis and some of the common things to help are Slippery Elm (powder, not capsule), probiotics, l-glutamine (powder) and fiber such as Metamucil (start slow and work up). Some chamomile tea can't hurt. I would try one at a time to see what works.
B

veritas44
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Date Joined Jan 2014
Total Posts : 24
   Posted 1/31/2014 8:59 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hateuc. I have heard great things about Slippery Elm and Psyllium Husk (the basic component of Metamucil, I believe), but never heard of L-Glutamine for GERD or IBS. How does that help?

javery
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Date Joined Sep 2013
Total Posts : 262
   Posted 1/31/2014 10:23 AM (GMT -6)   
L-Glutamine is a non-essential amino acid that helps with the rebuilding of muscle tissues. It is most commonly used by athletes that do a lot of training. It is believed to help with GERD by strengthening the LES as the LES is a muscle. There is no hard evidence that proves this but as it is a supplement with no bad side effects, it doesn't hurt to try it. I take it once a day and whether it helps or not, I'm not really sure at this point.

hateuc
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Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 2354
   Posted 1/31/2014 1:21 PM (GMT -6)   
Also will help with healing the stomach lining for Gastritis and well for my UC it can help heal the mucosal lining in the colon. Since I do a few things I can't pinpoint which is helping or not, but most of these things are fairly easy to try with minimal negative side effects. Finally for IBS-D the L-Glutamine may help slow down the diarrhea. Make sure to get the L-Glutamine, not the plain Glutamine.
Good luck!
UC diagnosed in 2010 but had prob. in 2009
2 Lialda/day Rowasa nightly, periodic anucort supp, starting Cortifoam 8/12
VSL#3, slippery elm
Metamucil wafers

mudmagnetmum
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Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 1604
   Posted 1/31/2014 2:31 PM (GMT -6)   
I was a frequent user of natural supplements in the past and had some training in this too. All this failed me when it came to GERD - so many things seem to aggravate, especially vitamin supplements. Anything in tablet form as opposed to capsule also tends to aggravate.

I have found DGL helpful and milk thistle. I can also tolerate flaxseed oil, which I take from time to time for my skin. Calcium supplements have also been OK, as was zinc.

Other things I have tried but were not helpful: D-Limonene, ACV (don't go there!), aloe vera (lots of GERDies like that one), L-glutamine, kale, slippery elm, mastic gum, Manuka honey and Iberogast. The Iberogast was possibly helpful, but like many supplements, just tends to increase the number of bathroom visits and if you have IBS you may want to avoid that. I'm still trying Iberogast and trying to get the dosage right bathroom wise!

Things that made it worse: licorice tea, chamomile tea, pretty much any kind of tea, ACV, oil of oregano, fish oil capsules, evening primrose capsules... And probably some others that I have forgotten!

You'll see from the forum that what aggravates one person maybe OK for another, but those of us with gastritis tend to be extra sensitive, so proceed with caution, only change one thing at a time and only purchase small quantities whilst you experiment!

MMM
GERD (3 years and counting)
Lifelong stuff: Food allergies/intolerance, eczema, asthma

mudmagnetmum
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Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 1604
   Posted 1/31/2014 7:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Thinking about it, I've also tried L-carnitine, digestive enzymes, marshmallow root and 5HT......
GERD (3 years and counting)
Lifelong stuff: Food allergies/intolerance, eczema, asthma

Andy1986
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 1178
   Posted 2/1/2014 6:53 AM (GMT -6)   
I find Aloe Vera really helpful for gastritis

mudmagnetmum
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Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 1604
   Posted 2/1/2014 8:21 AM (GMT -6)   
Do you get rapid relief from this Andy?

I found it hard to get hold of one that didn't contain sodium benzoate, which I'm allergic to.

MMM
GERD (3 years and counting)
Lifelong stuff: Food allergies/intolerance, eczema, asthma

rjdriver
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2013
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 2/1/2014 11:46 AM (GMT -6)   
iamloco,

You have three different conditions, the same three I have/had. The reflux and IBS are often related in terms of treatment, but gastritis requires something different, and needs to be healed first. But please check with your doctor before changing any treatment regimen that has been prescribed.

Like others have said, what works can vary a lot from person to person, but for gastritis you want to reduce stomach acid and take healing and anti inflammatory foods and supplements.

This is what I did for Gastritis:

I worry about the use of PPIs, like omeprazole and Nexium, except in dire conditions, and only for short periods (a few weeks), as long term use can have very bad side effects, particularly on your bones. So I used one of the H2 blockers like Zantac instead, as it doesn't eliminate ALL acid, only about 60-70%.

Dietary changes and supplements:

1. Reduce or eliminate if possible acidic and acid forming foods like tomato products, coffee, tea, most citrus fruits(some say lemon is OK), reduce alcohol, and spicy foods like onion and garlic and peppers. Yes, I know - life is not worth living without onion and garlic, but this is only temporary until your gastritis is healed :-).

2. L-glutimine powder - 1 heaping teaspoon mixed with water or your favorite non citrus juice every day - heals and rebuilds damaged stomach lining.

3. Chewable DGL, a form of licorice. (the chocolate flavor is nice). One 20 minutes before each meal. - healing and anti inflammatory.

4. Manuka honey - very expensive. Half a teaspoon every day. Healing, anti inflammatory, anti fungal and antibiotic.

5. Green tea, with honey if needed. Replaced first cup of coffee in the morning with this - healing, anti inflammatory, and the EGCG in it is known to cause cancer cell death (stops tumor growth). I have Barretts esophagus, so this was important to me.

6. Boswellia extract supplement- anti inflammatory

7. Inflamma-care. A supplement from Planetary Herbals. Contains turmeric, boswellia, ginger root, willow bark, Chinese skullcap, and a bunch of other anti-inflammatory herbs.

8. Aloe Vera juice - kills unfriendly gut bacteria, healing, alkaline forming, removes toxins form the body, aids digestion, boosts immune system.



Once my gastritis was healed, I worked on the IBS and acid reflux.

For IBS:

1. A good probiotic. Its best to reduce dairy products while doing this, but if they don't bother you, try that kind. If the diary based ones don't agree with you, look for Saccaromyces Boulardii.

2. Increase fiber intake. If you can do this with food, that's best. I added more fiber to my diet, but it wasn't enough so I had to supplement. The powdered ones got to be a pita, so I found a capsule from Yerba Prima.

3. Digestive enzymes. I take Digest Gold with each meal.

These will all help with your IBS, but will not be enough if, as in all likelihood, its associated with a stomach acid issue. The gas, bloating, and soft stool can all be connected with acid production.



Acid reflux, heartburn, GERD:

I never had heartburn in my life until about nine months ago. It wasn't until I had had 3-4 instances of it, over a 3 month period, mixed with other stomach/gut pains, that, after reading all I could find about it, I realized it was from too much aspirin. I had been taking aspirin and Alleve for leg pain. I never exceeded the recommended daily amount, and always took it with food. But I took it for about 3 months straight almost daily, and found that warning about damage to your stomach from NSAIDS is all too real.

As soon as I stopped the NSAIDS, there was no more heartburn, but a subsequent endoscopy revealed the gastritis, and the Barretts. While my doctor is not sure, I'm pretty convinced the gastritis was caused by the Nsaids, but the Barretts, maybe not. While this was my first experience with the heartburn that you feel in your chest, there had been about a half dozen instances of reflux into my throat over the last 10-12 years - always at night in bed. I never thought too much of it, as it happened so seldom. But now I think the damage to my esophagus occurred from this. As brief as these experiences were, there's no way of knowing how long the acid, or maybe bile, was sitting in my esophagus before it was painful enough to wake me up.

Whatever the cause, this is what I have done:

1. I continue all 8 gastritis treatments and 3 IBS treatments above, except, I have stopped taking acid suppressing drugs. WARNING - do not stop these drugs suddenly. You must taper off gradually, especially with PPIs. And once again, please consult your doctor before changing any treatment.

2. Raised the head of my bed about 4 inches. And never sleep on my right side. Making gravity my friend instead of foe.

3. Take Gaviscon (the Canadian version - NOT the US) - every night for the alginic acid effect (stops stomach contents from entering the esophagus.

4. I am currently testing with Betaine HCL to see if my condition is actually from too little stomach acid, rather than too much. ( you'll need to go off any acid suppressing drugs to try this). I am on day three of the testing with no burning yet, so it appears that too little acid may be the problem.

THIS LAST POINT (#4) IS IMPORTANT . I AM SHOUTING FOR A REASON HERE:

There is growing evidence that this condition is often misdiagnosed, and that suppressing acid is *exactly the opposite* of what's needed, especially if you are over 50, when acid production declines markedly. I wont go into it here, as this post is already too long, but please Google Chris Kresser and read his articles on heartburn and GERD. He is far from alone is his position. Or just Google "low stomach acid and heartburn". There is a 30 billion dollar antacid market at stake, so you will have to dig to find the others, including doctors, who are saying the same thing. But is it out there, and worth the trouble.


Bob

Post Edited (rjdriver) : 2/1/2014 8:00:03 PM (GMT-7)


hateuc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 2354
   Posted 2/1/2014 2:49 PM (GMT -6)   
Wow, Bob, that was awesome.  Thanks for all of the good info!
B

rjdriver
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2013
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 2/2/2014 1:54 PM (GMT -6)   
hateuc said...
Wow, Bob, that was awesome. Thanks for all of the good info!
B


Hi hateuc,

When my GI doc explained I had a pre-cancerous condition (Barrett's Esophagus) and sent me off to fill a prescription for a drug I had never heard of, with a full year of refills attached, I got curious pretty quickly. I scoured the Net in message forums like this one, medical journals, blogs, etc. and read everything I could get my hands on about Omeprazole, Barretts, GERD, gastritis, heartburn, and reflux.

At each place I learned a few things about how people were faring, some good and some tragic) on these PPI drugs, and also learned of alternative, natural, and holistic treatments. Much of what I wrote above can be found in various messages at this forum, but I thought it would be good to have it all in one place. And the subject of this particular post seemed just right, because often it can be difficult to find. What I'm doing may not work for everyone. It's just my story, and a work in progress. I hope some can benefit from it.

hateuc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 2354
   Posted 2/2/2014 5:08 PM (GMT -6)   
That is so great Bob and the info is really appreciated. I am copy/pasting it into a document so I can I refer to it. I suffer from Gastritis (alleged, not tested yet, but neg for H-pylori) and Ulcerative Colitis. I am always for trying some more natural means. I currently take Carafate for the Gastritis as the Prilosec and than Zantac really hurt my stomach and was not good for my Colitis. I am hoping to get off of the Carafate though eventually since it does contain aluminum. I do also take the DGL Licorice...think it helps some. I am going to try some more of your ideas :)
 
BTW, how long did it take to heal your Gastritis?  Also do you know why the extra acid causes loose stool etc...?
 
Thanks,
B
UC diagnosed in 2010 but had prob. in 2009
2 Lialda/day Rowasa nightly, periodic anucort supp, starting Cortifoam 8/12
VSL#3, slippery elm
Metamucil wafers

rjdriver
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2013
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 2/2/2014 5:58 PM (GMT -6)   
hateuc,

My gastritis has taken about 5 months to heal to the point where I no longer have any pain. I'm getting my next endoscopy in June, so I won't know for sure until then if my lack of pain means it's fully healed. But mine was from a specific cause - nsaids. And the nsaid use was only for 3 months, so I am not sure how serious it was. You may face a longer battle. I too was neg. for H.pylori, by the way. I just remembered something I forgot to put in my list for gastritis treatments - Carrot Juice. I was drinking a couple of ounces of that twice a day. It doesn't sound very appetizing, but it's surprisingly sweet.

As for the loose stool, I strongly suggest you read Chris Kresser's articles. He explains the connection between bowel inconsistencies and stomach acid. You'll see his theory revolves around not enough stomach acid, rather than too much. But with colitis, you may be in a whole other category. Even if they don't apply to your condition, his articles are extremely informative. Scientifically based, but easy to understand for the layman.

hateuc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 2354
   Posted 2/2/2014 8:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks again Bob, that is very, very helpful. I will def. check out Chris Kresser's article. You are a wealth of knowledge :) :) Wish my GI was as smart.
B
UC diagnosed in 2010 but had prob. in 2009
2 Lialda/day Rowasa nightly, periodic anucort supp, starting Cortifoam 8/12
VSL#3, slippery elm
Metamucil wafers

hld4good
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 196
   Posted 2/2/2014 10:24 PM (GMT -6)   
You may want to check your medications to see if they deplete certain nutrients. Just do a search for "drug-induced nutrient depletion" and look for your meds. The first thing I do with a new med is determine the possible nutrient depletion and discuss the solution with doc.

rjdriver
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2013
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 2/6/2014 11:12 AM (GMT -6)   
hateuc said...
Thanks again Bob, that is very, very helpful. I will def. check out Chris Kresser's article. You are a wealth of knowledge :) :) Wish my GI was as smart.
B


I wish mine was too.

diaba
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 175
   Posted 2/6/2014 2:23 PM (GMT -6)   
bob,why the Canadian gaviscon instead of the US?

thx

diaba
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 175
   Posted 2/6/2014 2:23 PM (GMT -6)   
bob,why the Canadian gaviscon instead of the US?

thx

rjdriver
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2013
Total Posts : 63
   Posted 2/6/2014 3:10 PM (GMT -6)   
diaba said...
bob,why the Canadian gaviscon instead of the US?

thx



The US version has aluminum in it. I prefer to avoid that. The Canadian version, and I believe the European version as well, has no aluminum. Another odd fact about Gaviscon is that the US version lists the alginic acid as an "inactive" ingredient, but everywhere else in the world, it's listed in the active ingredients. It's getting to the point where I do not trust any of the US regulatory agencies at all anymore. There is some skullduggery afoot with this one.

You can buy the Canadian version from canada drugs dot com. There's also a product called Esophageal Guardian from Life Extension that has alginic acid in it for the same type of protection. Both of these have only a small amount of actual antacid ingredients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, etc.). The mechanism behind Esophageal Guardian and Gaviscon involves the formation of a temporary physical barrier—or raft—between the stomach and the esophagus. The secret to this technology is what happens when alginic acid and a bicarbonate come into contact with gastric acids. Alginic acid forms a gel and the bicarbonate produces bubbles that get trapped in that gel—producing a floating foam layer that sits above the contents of the stomach, and keeps any acid from touching the esophagus.

Post Edited (rjdriver) : 2/7/2014 7:45:16 PM (GMT-7)


diaba
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 175
   Posted 2/7/2014 4:06 PM (GMT -6)   
thanks, i'll check that out. Does it matter if it's liquid or the tablet form? Also, I may have a hernia(endoscopy says yes, swallow study says no), what will happen if I take the gaviscon if I have a hernia? I guess it will be one way to find out if I do.

thanks again, diana

Post Edited (diaba) : 2/8/2014 11:35:03 AM (GMT-7)

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