I've invented a valve! - Please delete

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GC1pink
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts : 532
   Posted 2/26/2014 5:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Guys -

Could I please ask you all to delete your posts - as I have been approached by a company who is interested in our product - but does not want me to divulge any info about it - considering that this may be to all our benefits - can you please delete your postings in reference to my "product"

thank you.

Post Edited (GC1pink) : 3/12/2014 5:02:21 AM (GMT-6)


theacidrefluxman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 739
   Posted 2/26/2014 7:15 PM (GMT -6)   
I once made a joke about doing my own Nissen on myself with a rubber band. You, sir, have successfully one-upped me. I wish you the best.

speden
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 175
   Posted 2/26/2014 9:52 PM (GMT -6)   
I watched the video, but couldn't really see how the valve works. Is it spring loaded to keep it shut? Does the weight of food push it open for people that have poor motility?

How would the valve stay free of gunk that might make it get stuck open or closed?

How would you avoid saliva pooling above the valve since it wouldn't be heavy enough to push the valve open?

If it's air tight, wouldn't you get a lot of bloating from trapped gas in the stomach?

Since the valve is kind of holding the LES open by the diameter of the valve, I wonder if that could trigger painful muscle spasms for some people with a feeling of something stuck that they can't swallow.

Then there is the bane of hard materials against soft tissue of migration over time. In that area of the body I guess the concern would be erosion through the wall of the esophagus.

I think it's very difficult for passive approaches to replicate the muscular action of a normal LES. To have good function seems to require active opening and closing in response to events such as swallowing, gas pressure, saliva, etc.

Fundoplication is basically a passive rubber band around the LES, but made of living tissue so you don't have migration and erosion issues, or scar tissue problems. But you get no active opening, and you get changes in elasticity over time leading to a too tight or too loose rubber band.

Linx is a smarter rubber band, but since it is a foreign object inside the body, it gets encased in scar tissue and loses a lot of its ability to open over time. Perhaps by being inside the esophagus, your valve might at least avoid a lot of scar tissue forming on it.

The endostim seems the most promising approach to me since it maintains an active valve and sounds like its stimulation builds muscle tone in the LES, and I'm sure most of us have thought we could help our reflux if only we had a way to exercise the LES.

The other approach I like is the idea of injecting muscles stem cells into the esophagus to make it stronger, but that kind of approach is probably still a decade or more away.

I would think for a mechanical valve to work, it needs to be actively powered somehow to respond to events, or at least have a way for the user to manually open and close it when needed. Like suppose I really need to burp, if I could twist a magnet near the valve to crack it open I could let the gas escape.

I'd love to hear more about the design of the valve about how you plan to tackle these kind of issues. So many approaches have been tried and have failed. It's really a very complex area of the human anatomy with high pressures and physical stresses, plus corrosive chemicals to boot.

DontStealMyBacon
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2013
Total Posts : 186
   Posted 2/26/2014 10:44 PM (GMT -6)   
I have been thinking about how I would design that valve if I could make it for several years. The main problem I know of with sticking any type of metal implant inside a body is that bacteria love metal surfaces. In an internal area that that does not have a lot of motion through it, like the outside of the esophagus where the LINX device is implemented, I assume bacterial growth is more manageable. When you are talking about the interior of the esophagus that facilitates a lot of transport, rapid bacterial growth is definitely an issue to keep in mind since it can spread easily. You will be able to see how big of a factor this is as soon as you can test it on any living body.

Stem cells are proving to be successful on repairing the LES in multiple countries. It's hard to post updates on the progress that each project has made since it can change so rapidly, but it certainly is a number of years away from clinical use. There don't seem to be a lot of side effects resulting from multiplying and/or implanting stem cells from the host's own body, but it does still need time to study the long term effects. I would like to get my hands on some stem cells, but the lab I am working in right now doesn't have any so I probably won't see any for a while.

The big opportunity that hasn't been mentioned above that I am part of researching right now is through tissue engineering and genetic engineering. Tissue engineering can be studied to repair the damaged tissue, which would more likely be scar tissue than muscle or nerve damage, and is at about the same stage as stem cell research is. Genetic engineering is an extremely useful and successful field than can be used to identify and modify broken genes and the products made by those broken genes. This has been successfully used to study eosinophilic esophagitis recently by studying the genomes of millions of people with and without EE and identifying exactly what gene is malfunctioning in all of the patients with EE. In the recent study on EE, levels of proteins relevant to the disease were tested and managed to find the exact protein that was being overexpressed in every tested genome of EE patients. Thanks to the human genome project, this protein was connected with a single gene, and now further work can be done to either modify the broken gene through genetic regulation or edit the broken genes with gene therapy. I am hoping to do the same principal on researching the genes responsible for LES malfunction in GERD when I have my own lab in the future. For now, I am working on genetic engineering on another topic and if things work out, I will be researching EE this summer.
Right Temporal Lobectomy 4/5/12
Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication 12/17/13

Diagnosed with GERD, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, and Epilepsy.
Studying biomedical engineering to research a better fix to at least one of them.

DOGGBONES
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2012
Total Posts : 707
   Posted 2/27/2014 6:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Congrats and good luck! I'm a firm believer that stem cell is our ticket out of here, I just wish there was more research on using it.

DOGGBONES
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2012
Total Posts : 707
   Posted 2/27/2014 3:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Quote from the bottom link:
 
"This is one potential advantage of this approach; it could theoretically fix the underlying problem and eliminate the need for medications," said Pasricha.
 
It makes you wonder way we haven't heard anything since 2009 about this....the quote says it all "eliminate the need for medications", big parm and the government won't let that cash cow get away!
 
It appears that our answers are right there....stem cell, however nobody but us want it to happen.
 
GC1,
That's a great idea, however I'm not the right person to champion our cause. Long work hours, children, wife, home repairs, this illness and everyday hussle of life just leaves barely with enough strength to complete the day. I just don't have that kind of strength anymore......I'm sorry.

amo
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 70
   Posted 2/27/2014 3:36 PM (GMT -6)   
:-) Thanks! This is exciting! I am scheduled for my 2nd Nissen fundo , partial this time. I hope this will be the next option when this one wares out or fails.

Please keep us updated,
Amo

ericapeace2000
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2012
Total Posts : 1110
   Posted 2/28/2014 10:10 AM (GMT -6)   
This is very interesting and exciting! Keep us posted on what is going on.
GERD Moderator; Diagnosed GERD, possible IBS; Gluten free since 2012; low lactose since 2012

DOGGBONES
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2012
Total Posts : 707
   Posted 2/28/2014 3:29 PM (GMT -6)   
We have found our champion for the cause.....congrats Gord-on!

diaba
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 175
   Posted 2/28/2014 5:02 PM (GMT -6)   
just a thought, but until a new valve can be grown or transplanted, how about a remote controlled valve that can be opened when we eat, need to burp, throw-up, etc.

Maybe far-fetched, but don't they have remote insulin delivery systems, and implanted defibillators, so maybe...

thanks to all who are doing the research, it is greatly appreciated!

theacidrefluxman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 739
   Posted 3/7/2014 8:19 AM (GMT -6)   
Hey Gord-on

I also don't know anything about a risk like that, but have seen research conducted on the development of EAC and how one theory is that bile (not acid) stimulates the gastric junction, where there are stem cells which become cancerous. Now this was a way back, so my details may be wrong, but long story short it was in relation to cancer growing in that area a lot because of the existence of stem cells there.

GC1pink
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts : 532
   Posted 3/12/2014 7:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Guys - can I ask you to delete your posts that have any reference to my product - as I have a company interested and they don't want any info out there.

As this is in everyone's interested could I ask you to delete your posts about my product.

many thanks and I'll keep you informed. turn

Gord-on
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2014
Total Posts : 35
   Posted 3/12/2014 1:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Done. Good luck.

GC1pink
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2012
Total Posts : 532
   Posted 3/12/2014 2:03 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you Gord-on :)

Keep us informed if you get any correspondence from the company about the muscle treatment please.
LPR, Hypothyroidism, Glaucoma, Dry Eye Syndrome, Positional Vertigo

"We have invented our own valve now - so wish us luck!"
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