For successful fundoplication members.

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Pat Tall
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 950
   Posted 7/14/2014 8:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Many times I've heard that our forum has members with problems only.

Rarely are there 'successful' fundoplication members-- they tend to drift away as they are feeling well and have no need to chat on our forum.

I would like to keep this topic for those that feel they are well and without residual problems following fundoplication surgery.

We need more problem free members helping us out and not leaving. If you are around, please comment under this subject. Thanks!

Retired Seabee, Sew Lady, Bill, Denise and others. Let's fill up this topic with SUCCESS so that others can sense hope. Thanks very much.

Age at surgery, gender, date of surgery, ( if comfortable posting personal ), would you do it again, would you recommend it, pearls of wisdom, how you arrived at your decision to have surgery, how long it took you to arrive at decision to proceed with surgery--scary thing.

Thanks. Pat

kyheart
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 515
   Posted 7/14/2014 9:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello Pat

My name is Sandi and I had my Nissen Fundoplication on April 1st 2011. I am relatively without issue. I have a problem still with bread and I can't drink coffee and soft drinks but I am an exception.. most can go back to eating normally. I was 62 when I had the surgery and YES, I would have it again if necessary. I was on a variety of PPI's before my surgery and my last was Nexium 40mg twice a day. It didn't touch my reflux in the end and I made the decision after 13 years of agony to have the surgery to fix it.. My surgeon was exceptional.. he had been doing the NF since it was new. He told me, when I told him he gave me my life back, that I was the reason he was a surgeon.. to help people who have lost their quality of life... I would recommend this surgery to anyone who has went through all of the testing and feels that they have no where else to turn.. get an exceptional surgeon.. ask questions and make sure they have been doing this a long time, get references from prior patients.. you will not regret it. BUT.. if you have this surgery, be prepared to have a long recovery.. you will be able to do lite duty work relatively quickly, but you have to ease into recovery.. the outside heals quickly, the inside takes time!!!!
My last comment would have to be... if you decide or are in the process of deciding , to have the surgery... stay on this site and ask questions till you have no more to ask.. the wonderful people here will be happy to help you..
HELLO, Denise, Bill, Joy and Miss Kitt.. I still have to watch my energy level.. the heart just doesn't want me to act like I'm 30 anymore.. it wants me to act my age... tongue

be on the lookout for beautiful RAINBOWS smurf tongue turn turn tongue smurf
Sandi

Pat Tall
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 950
   Posted 7/15/2014 8:27 PM (GMT -6)   
My goodness, I'm hoping we have more happy , successful fundo members out there that can give us hope and encouragement. Please join in.

Thank you kyheart, Sandi-- really glad to hear of your success. Who performed your surgery as it seems you would recommend him. He must have done very many of them and others might need the name too. Thanks for responding . We need to fill up this topic. Pat

Retired Seabee
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2013
Total Posts : 129
   Posted 7/15/2014 8:32 PM (GMT -6)   
I am post HH/NF one year and three months--13 March 2013. I am sure my results are atypical. I did not have the debilitating digestive problems that others have had. My probem stemmed from the Histal Hernia that I had for 40+ years. I had a HH repair and a full floppy at Keesler AFB hospital. I had been on Nexium for years with good results as far as the control of acid when I watched my diet and ate my major meal early in the day. If I didn't, I had nightly silent reflux. I did all of the mechanical things--elevating the head of the bed, etc. but still woke up coughing-up reflux and choking. I finally had a serious lung abscess and decided to see if there was any alternative. After all of the tests and in view of the lung problems, the Air Force doctors almost required me to have the operation. They said if I didn't I could be denied all treatment at military facilities.

I studied all approaches to the operation on the internet and other sources. I used the archives of HealingWell and other Websites and read every question and answer in those files that related to my problem. I really became an amateur expert in the digestive system as related to our problems. So I went into it well prepared...and I was still scared. I even asked the Doctor if they could do the HH repair without the Fundoplication. They told me that they wouldn't do it that way due to their established Air Force medical procedures.

Anyway, through a lot of prayer, and confidence in my doctors, I went into the operating room relaxed and confident. They had given me a vallium to use the morning before surgery but I didn't need it. Five hours later I woke up in my hospital room and to this date haven't had one incident of reflux. I haven't used any Nexium or antacids since then and within three weeks I was back on my normal schedule. I can now eat anything and sleep through the night. The only problems that I have involve other people. At my age, most of my pleasure and socializing revolves around food and eating. That presents problems because I don't really get real hunger pangs like I used to. So, I am somewhat dependent on eating when someone else is hungry or eating by the clock--breakfast time, lunchtime and dinnertime. If I eat single portions and then quit I am satisfied. However, if other people continue to eat, they expect me to be sociable and continue also. The same is true if we go to a buffet. Everyone else goes back for seconds or more. My wife gets miffed because she assumes that since I am done eating, I am anxious to leave. If I overeat I get pressure in my stomach that takes hours to get rid of. I don't know if I can vomit because the need hasn't arisen. I can burp but it takes focus to do it. I can drink carbonated beverages using a straw.

At any rate, the HH repair and Fundoplication are the best thing I ever did medically. I had a good active life before surgery. As a retiree I played tennis six mornings a week and was very active. It was the nightly reflux that was my sole problem. Since surgery I am back on that schedule and have had no post surgical problems. I regret that I didn't have it done sooner and would do it again in a heartbeat.

I would be happy to answer any questions directly at the E-mail address in my profile

TonyG
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2013
Total Posts : 254
   Posted 7/16/2014 12:33 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm post-Nissen one year and 3 months and will preach from the highest peaks possible that it was the best decision I've ever made.

Prior to surgery, I had been on a variety of PPI's for over 15 years. Towards "the end", I was on Protonix 4x's a day and sleeping sitting up with little to no relief from constant acid in my throat. I couldn't drink water or brush my teeth without feeling reflux. All the requisite tests prior to surgery revealed that the only solution would have been to have the Nissen Fundoplication done. My LES was virtually non-existent and I had DeMeester scores that alarmed my surgeon and had him move up my surgery from the originally planned date. On endoscopy I had a 4-5cm ring of Barretts cells completely encircling my esophagus and so much scarring, inflammation, and "generalized extracellular ooze" that it made the surgery more complicated than it should have been.

I'm out in California, in my 40's and had a brilliant Thoracic Surgeon well-versed in the Nissen procedure do my surgery. I learned much of what I should and shouldn't do from this forum as well as information given to me from my surgeon. Due to a couple complications, my procedure lasted 5 hours and I spent 3 days in the hospital then was off of work for 6 weeks. I wouldn't have changed a thing. To those that are ready to go back to work after 1-week, I applaud you. I definitely could not have gone back after that short of a recovery period. The only side effect of the surgery I have now is that I still can't burp effectively. Although, the ability to do so is coming back little-by-little. My diet is back to my pre-surgery diet (albeit in smaller doses...and spicier than ever!).

Now, I have absolutely no reflux at all, all signs of Barretts cells have disappeared, and any signs of esophagitis & gastritis are gone. I haven't taken a single PPI since the day before my surgery. The only outwardly visible signs I've had surgery are the 8 bullet-wound scars on my belly.

To those that are considering or already scheduled for the Nissen Fundoplication procedure, I absolutely challenge you to do everything you can to be prepared up front. I can't stress enough the importance of ensuring you have meal plans in place and that your caregivers understand what you'll be experiencing. Your diet and nutrition will be key to your successful recovery. On top of that all, you need to listen to your body and don't push it. Relax and succumb to the recovery process.

I'm happy to take any questions via the email address in my profile. Please include "HEALINGWELL" in your subject line so that you don't automatically go to my spam folder!

-TonyG-
-TonyG-
Nissen Fundoplication April 30, 2013
Pain-Free, Reflux-Free, Sleeping on my back!

Post Edited (TonyG) : 7/16/2014 3:53:31 PM (GMT-6)


Pat Tall
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 950
   Posted 7/16/2014 2:48 PM (GMT -6)   
THANK YOU RETIRE SEABEE AND TonyG
Your comments help so many to feel encouraged and help them to make a decision. I agree that our forum helps soooo much.

Keep on posting--successful fundoplication members. We need you.

opnwhl4
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 4961
   Posted 7/16/2014 9:18 PM (GMT -6)   
Ok, I'll join in devil

Here is a link to my story in case I forget anything. My story as well as Denise's and other great resources are on the sticky threads at the top of the forum.
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=45&m=2337138[url]

Anyhow... I am 8 years and 1 month or so out from my original nissen. Best decision I made as far as my GERD treatment. I was up to double dose PPIs twice a day and extra ant acids as needed before I decided on surgery. Well actually I had went into my GI appointment with the intention of asking about surgery, this was a follow up for an EGD for a Barretts check.

I didn't even get to ask because my GI told me my options were quadruple the PPIs, which she did not recommend, or surgery. I chose option 2.

Now I do wish I had found this site before I had my 1st surgery as I went in blind and just went to a general surgeon I had for my gall bladder. While he is a very good surgeon, he just didn't have the skills for this surgery. Even with incorrect surgery I was reflux free, well pretty much had to be since hardly anything could get past.

Finally found out what was wrong after almost 3 years and something like 15 dilations and a few manometries, ph studies, and barium swallows. Something was seen strange on the last swallow test and my new surgeon and I agreed on exploratory surgery to see what was up.

Betting I am about the only patient to have their surgeon thank them for being such a pest and demanding them do more to find out what was wrong. He really did thank me in recovery, no kidding. He said it a few times. That's about all I remember from that recovery room stint.

Well as it would happen during an EGD to recheck my Barretts the scope tore a hole in my esophagus almost 2 years later. It was believed that due to all the dilations and past damage I was one of the very few unlucky ones.

Had surgery to repair the tear and unfortunately what had to be done to save my esophagus tore apart my wrap. After 4 months of feeding tubes and PICC lines I had healed enough to start to eat and drink again. At 6 months post op for the tear I was cleared to have the nissen redone again. What a relief that was. Dealing with a stent holding my LES wide open and then it not being able to close at all on it's own when it was removed my reflux was at it's absolute worst.

Had my 2nd redo, open surgery this time. Besides dealing with what looked like a zipper down my belly from the staples that itches horribly, it was my easiest nissen recovery. Not sure if it was because of what I'd been through the last 6 months or what, but everything was easier.

So, after 3 nissens, 2 holes in my stomach, and a torn esophagus I'd still have it redone tomorrow should it ever fail. Actually I have yet to really have one fail on it's own. 1 was done wrong, 1 was torn apart by an esophagus stent to stop my esophagus from leaking and allow me to keep it.

Guess I am quite lucky after the tear also. I am constantly told by doctors and nurses that I am doing remarkably well after what happened and I didn't loose my esophagus. yeah

Take care,
Bill
opnwhl4
Moderator: GERD/Heartburn, Kidney disease

Nissen 6/06 and 5/09
#3 8/24/11

Pat Tall
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 950
   Posted 7/16/2014 9:51 PM (GMT -6)   
Opnwh14. Bill, thanks. You are truly one of my favorites. Y'all have helped so many we appreciate you, your advice and kind words.
<<< hug>>>.

limbo lady
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2014
Total Posts : 14
   Posted 7/17/2014 3:04 AM (GMT -6)   
I had the lapro Nissan done 16 yrs ago, worked out well, started to get some heartburn about 2 yrs ago, take prevacid now, this is nothing like the acid that came up my throat before the surgery. I'd have the surgery done again if I had to.

JulieUK
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2014
Total Posts : 27
   Posted 7/17/2014 11:23 AM (GMT -6)   
I had Nissen done 3months ago now and am feeling great. I was very worried about the operation beforehand but am so pleased i had it done. I had a large hiatus hernia so was advised to have op before onset of Barretts.

I can eat most things now, but tend avoid bread and fizzy drinks, i always forget and eat to much, which then mimics the symptoms of reflux. Just try to eat less and chew well.

Its so lovely to be able to sleep normally and wake up without the sore inside mouth and throat due to the reflux. My voice is now almost back to normal, so another plus there. I am back at work, swimming and looking after my 2yr old grandson, so very busy. I would recommend this op to anyone who is suffering severe symptoms, but do ensure you check out yr surgeon carefully.

I dont take any medicines at all now, just the occasional Gaviscon when i eat too much.

This forum has been so wonderful, offering advice and reassurance, it has certainly helped me so much. I am so much more confident now, at first i was so worried that the wrap had come undone when i experienced what i thought were symptoms of reflux. But i am starting to understand that it is a long road to full recovery, and what i need to eat/do to help me get there.

Dont ever worry on your own, i am confident that the forum will allay your fears and set you on the right path with any problems.
Julie
Post Nissen surgery

1039smooth
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2013
Total Posts : 2114
   Posted 7/17/2014 10:18 PM (GMT -6)   
I can't help but be a little envious. Bless you all.
LapNissen Fundoplication, 8/9/13
GERD, Anxiety, Depression

opnwhl4
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 4961
   Posted 7/18/2014 2:26 AM (GMT -6)   
John-

I still believe things will turn around for you brother. Stay in the moment and keep pluggin away one day at a time my friend.

Take care,
Bill

Oh....just to let you know, I have never been bothered by our talks. Forgive me if I seemed a bit off at times. that's my issues from the Gulf War.
opnwhl4
Moderator: GERD/Heartburn, Kidney disease

Nissen 6/06 and 5/09
#3 8/24/11

eLaReF
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 74
   Posted 7/18/2014 3:01 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi all

Had my Nissen in October 2003 when I was 35, so coming up for 11 years ago.

I haven't been able to burp or vomit since, but to be completely honest this isn't as bad as it sounds and I'm completely used to it now and I can eat and drink whatever I like whenever I like without any problems.

Before the op I'd had a chronic cough and really bad heartburn for years beforehand and it got to a point where I was in agony from eating and drinking - I remember one night out with friends I only drank crème de menthe as I was hoping it's mintyness wouldn't irritate my stomach.

I was on an ever increasing dose of PPI's which were still not working, and was lucky to have a GP (I live in the UK) who diagnosed the problem (a weak Lower Oesophageal Sphincter) and referred me to a specialist for what was then a fairly new laprascopic procedure in the NHS - they were still doing open surgery for this at the time!

Have to admit I was really nervous about this, and there wasn't as much information available then (like this site) or the years worth of data available now showing success rates.

I was in hospital for 2 days and only had a liquid/soft diet (mainly soups and protein shakes) for 6 weeks post op. I didn't have much pain, or any complications during this early recovery period.

Can say with hindsight that it has turned out to have been a really good decision for me. I haven't had a PPI since and the only niggles I get now are when I eat too much or too fast - but this isn't much different to anyone else.

Hope this helps anyone considering this - my advice is to take your time and ask plenty of questions to make sure this is right option for you.

All the best.

Les.

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7188
   Posted 7/18/2014 9:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Pat,

What a great idea! yeah yeah yeahWrapped Club Successes! yeah yeah yeah It is true that as people make their way through recovery, it can sound as if the majority of them don't have successful results, which couldn't be further from the truth.

Most people don't even post online at all...just have the surgery, make their way through recovery, and go off on their merry way. Those who post are either very internet savvy and spend lots of time researching online, or are having trouble with their recovery.

Surgeons almost universally fail to prepare their patients for the recovery, and honestly, I don't really think they truly know what it's like. They are unlikely to have had the surgery themselves, and tend to see their patient maybe once or twice post-op. That's the beauty of this forum! It's amazing to hear member after member share their misconceptions about the recovery--many times perpetrated by their surgeon's advice. Perhaps Nissen surgeons ought to visit this forum to see what people really go through.

The first two weeks of recovery are extremely challenging, as they should be! This is MAJOR SURGERY, and six months for most of the healing and a year for the rest. I found improvements even into the second year. Therefore, in the first weeks and months, recovery is just beginning. As Bill says, this recovery is a marathon, not a sprint. There can be two steps forward, and a step backward.

Recovery isn't a straight line experience. Often someone will get a little too frisky with their eating, and cause wrap pain, and irritation. This will not be forever. Just move back to earlier eating patterns...slow down, baby your wrap/stomach, and given a week or so, you'll be back to normal. Even after several months of recovery, you can overdo it, and irritate your wrap/stomach.

Surgeons will provide a wide range of eating protocols. Some require liquids only for up to six weeks. Others, like mine, trust their patients to make smart eating choices,and give them a lot more freedom. The first few weeks, soups and soft foods feel the best, but crispy things like saltines, can be chewed to a liquid. At Day 6 post-op, my surgeon set me free to eat anything that could be chewed to a liquid. That made my recovery much more enjoyable. My mouth/teeth were my blender, and I took small bites, chew, chew, chewed my food thoroughly, and swallowed ONLY things that had chewed to a complete liquid/creamy consistency. Here is an eating protocol you can check out:

www.oregonsurgical.com/pdfs/Nissen_Fundoplication_Diet.pdf

Another surprising side effect of the surgery is shoulder/collar bone pain. This really puzzled me, as I couldn't understand what possible connection the shoulder could have to stomach surgery! In fact, the pain is mainly due to referred pain from diaphragm irritation (with the hiatus hernia repair) as well as gas that is used to blow up the inside of the body to make it possible to see the surgical field more clearly during laproscopic surgery. A very smart night nurse suggested that I get up and walk each time I went to the bathroom, which I did...all night. I continued walking at home, and I found that the more I walked the less of this painful shoulder pain I felt, and visa-versa.

Those are a few tips I can think of. While I know that this is off topic, I assume those who are reading these positive experiences are seeking information about the surgery, and perhaps this bit of information might be helpful.

A positive attitude is the key to making it through this recovery. If you can surrender and accept what is, you'll find your recovery much easier. Those who struggle against the reality of the experience have a very tough time of it. You can't rush this. Your body needs time and permission to heal in its own sweet time. Once you've had surgery, you don't have a choice. You have to go through recovery, and you can either relax into it, and go with the flow, or you can stress over it and be miserable. It'll be your choice!

Now to my experience...
I had my Nissen fundoplication in February 2009 (at age 57). I had atypical syptoms...the main reason I had the surgery was an attempt to improve the health of my lungs. My asthma had gotten increasingly worse over many years. I'd been on Prilosec, Nexium, and after a hospitalization with GERD exacerbated uncontrollable asthma, I was switched to Protonix. While much of my reflux was silent/LPR-type, I did get breakthrough heartburn.

My GI doc didn't think my asthma was caused by reflux, because my 24hr PH monitor/DeMeester score was never high. GI docs tend to be more focused on high levels of reflux that can cause esophageal damage, and aren't really knowledgeable about how very small amounts of reflux can cause severe lung effects.

During the six years prior to my surgery, my lungs were in terrible shape. I was using a nebulizer several times a day, and coughing up large amounts of mucous. I also had repeated lung infections. My asthma doc and PCP were certain that the reflux was creating my uncontrollable asthma.

I didn't push for surgery, either. I saw so many scary posts online that I was fearful that the surgical "cure" was very likely to make me even worse, with all kinds of GI issues. Now I realize that most of the things I read were written by people in the throes of recovery, who were fearful that they'd have these symptoms forever (again, I blame this on surgeons not preparing their patients for the reality of recovery, and providing them with helpful guidance). Of course there will be patients who, unfortunately, had inexperienced, unqualified surgeons, and had poor results, but I believe this is the minority.

Anyway, finally, with lots of pressure from my PCP, my GI doc finally decided that perhaps I might want to see a surgeon ("no rush", and "I could just continue on medications as treatment"). I saw the surgeon, and had surgery three weeks later. I had to try surgery...my PCP said my lungs were in life-threatening condition. I figured if it didn't help my lungs, at least I could rule out reflux as the cause.

It took 3 months for my lungs to heal post-op. I had a lung infection and coughed my way through recovery. I was always fearful that I'd cough my wrap/stitches out, but fortunately they held strong. I'd been on lots of steroids, and my internal tissue was so fragile that my surgeon put in extra sutures to help hold it.

It was amazing. In May, when my pollen allergies were in full-swing, I suddenly found myself much, much better, and no longer in need of a nebulizer and high doses of steroids. It was miraculous. I knew my odds weren't as good as those with typical heartburn/GERD symptoms. Atypical symptoms have about a 75-80% success rate, which in my book were pretty good odds. Fortunately, I was one of the success stories! While I still have asthma due to pollen, my lungs have remained healthy and normal.

I found this forum shortly before my surgery, and in fact, Bill was one of my heroes! Although he was struggling through a wrap surgery (his first) that caused him a lot of swallowing issues, he was still extremely positive. I figured if someone who needed a redo was that happy with the surgery, it must be worth the effort. There were many very positive people who helped me through my recovery, and it made all the difference. That's the reason I stuck around long after my surgery to help others the way I was helped. I love that some of our happily recovered members are still sticking around to post and provide support and share their positive outcomes. That makes this forum so helpful!

Thanks again, Pat, for thinking of this thread. I agree that people need to read positive stories, as so many threads are all about the problems experienced during recovery. People living through the first months of recovery can fear that they'll never improve, and hearing from others who have completed their recoveries with positive results is extremely important. You provide so much help and support, and it is appreciated!

Happy healing to one and all, and good luck to those contemplating surgery! It's definitely worth the effort!
Denise

GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

"Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists.”

“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”

“Accept - then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”
Eckhart Tolle

Post Edited (dencha) : 7/19/2014 3:40:43 PM (GMT-6)


Pat Tall
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 950
   Posted 7/19/2014 8:56 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks Denise, Bill , Les,--wonderful information and FROM THE HEART.

Your remarks/comments/suggestions will help so many make a decision and to search for that very experienced surgeon. It will help even those that don't write on the forum. (There are a lot of lurkers). Hope we can fill this topic with many successful members. When you get 'through' or 'over' that healing process that you are questioning under other topics, then please remember this "successful" topic and come back and tell us about it.

Thanks and come back.

Altair
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2013
Total Posts : 39
   Posted 7/19/2014 4:20 PM (GMT -6)   
I know it's a bit early, but my experience so far has been challenging, but overall, very rewarding. I'm glad I got it done.

I was originally diagnosed with Barrett's and GERD when I was a teenager. Further testing found LA grade C esophagitis, a large hiatal hernia, delayed gastric emptying, gastritis, Cameron lesions/ulcers/erosions, and esophageal stricture.

I suffered from severe abdominal pain that would frequently land me in the emergency department looking for pain relief. I was nauseated frequently and would retch and vomit almost daily.

I tried all the PPIs and the only one that provided sustained relief was Dexilant. Reglan helped, but I didn't get on with the side effects and my doctor stopped it. I switched to Domperidone and that was worlds better.

Due to my young age, surgery was recommended and I was really on board with hopefully being able to stop the medicines, which I needed several times a day every day to keep the symptoms under control. I was in my late 20s when I had the surgery.

I had a lap Toupet fundoplication in April 2014. It's now July 2014, and I'm not fully 100% yet but have definitely felt the benefits of surgery even this early on. I still have problems with some foods like chicken and bread, but most things are tolerable with patient chewing. I've been told it will take longer to get my full diet back, so it's still early days to expect easy swallowing with everything.

I've not taken any medications and have been largely symptom-free. When I do get a "flare up" it seems to be connected with getting a bit overzealous with the eating and irritating my stomach. But a few days of "babying" usually clears it up.

I stayed home for 8 weeks since I have a long commute and relatively physically active job. I'm still feeling a bit fatigued now and tire more easily than before, but again, I've been told that a full recovery will take more months and to not expect too much too soon.

I've had some episodes of vomiting after my surgery when I tried to transition from liquids to solid soft foods, but my surgeon said it was okay with my wrap and wouldn't damage it (Toupet v. Nissan I'm thinking). I hope mine is okay, but if it did get damaged, I would certainly have a re-do. Not taking pills all the time is great. Not waking up and throwing up is great. Not feeling nauseated after every meal is great. Even my asthma seems to have improved a bit.

I hope several months and years from now, my wrap will be as happy as it is now and functioning as well as it is now.

Edit to add:

I read on this forum that most surgeons don't really prepare you for what the recovery process is like. I'm fully on board with that. I had a very good surgeon with loads of experience doing the procedure. He talked me through what recovery would be like before I made my decision, but I don't think I really "got" it.

I thought something like "trouble swallowing" would mean I would have to gulp a few times to get stuff down, not be in agony while stuff got stuck and I would have to throw it up.

So I would recommend anyone considering surgery to really try and get a good clear picture of what will/might happen - from your surgeon, from the forum, etc. Many times during my recovery, I remember thinking "the surgeon told me x was going to happen" and then actually feeling "x" was a lot different from the mental picture I had of what to expect.

Post Edited (Altair) : 7/19/2014 3:35:16 PM (GMT-6)


Pat Tall
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 950
   Posted 7/19/2014 4:29 PM (GMT -6)   
Wonderful post. Thanks Altair. You have a great attitude!

opnwhl4
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 4961
   Posted 7/19/2014 9:51 PM (GMT -6)   
I have an add on about surgeons not preparing us for the recovery.

My PCP had been considering this surgery and at one of my appointments a few years ago asked ME what it was really like! He said he didn't believe the surgeon friends he knew and wanted to hear from someone who had been through it and what to really expect in the long run.

He has since moved out of state, so I don;t know if he ever went through it or not.

Take care,
Bill
opnwhl4
Moderator: GERD/Heartburn, Kidney disease

Nissen 6/06 and 5/09
#3 8/24/11

SEW LADY
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2014
Total Posts : 17
   Posted 7/20/2014 2:35 PM (GMT -6)   
I am 68 and am 7 months post "wrap". It was the best thing I have ever done for my health and well being. Had been on PPIs for over 15 years and had added varieties of Tums up to 10 times per day. I had reflux and heartburn. I had watched my diet, raised the bed, stopped eating in the evening and all the other remedies. Now I am back to normal. I have eaten steak, asparagus, pineapple and all kinds of bread. I can drink fizzy drinks and wine again. The only thing I find is that if I eat too much, I get a heavy feeling near the wrap, but a cup of warm camomile tea takes that away. I would do this again in a heartbeat!!

My suggestion to others thinking about this surgery is: Find the best surgeon in your area and go there. I drove 2 hours to the best in FL for all the tests, appointments, surgery and follow-up appointments. This is a delicate surgery and you should have someone who knows what they are doing do your surgery. My surgeon is the one people go to to fix their botched surgery.

Good luck to everyone out there for finding a great surgeon!

srh4jc
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2014
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 7/21/2014 10:04 AM (GMT -6)   
I can tell you that I am glad to see this section! There is so much "bad" information out there that I almost considered not having this done. I am still in the decision making process and was excited to see someone with my exact conditions go through it ! Thank you all you successful writers!

Pat Tall
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 950
   Posted 7/21/2014 10:44 AM (GMT -6)   
SEW LADY, BILL, -- thanks for your comments

srh4jc. Thanks-- your comments reflect the view of many!

Hello successful fundo members-- keep the remarks coming-- helps many make a scary decision. The members say they "would do it again." That tells us sooooo much.

Thanks. Pat

srh4jc
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2014
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 7/21/2014 6:50 PM (GMT -6)   
I think my main concern with this surgery is the reports of pain when trying to swallow and feeling discomfort for hours. I already have a stricture in my esophagus and have had the pain when swallowing but it doesn't last long. I have to sit straight and wait for it to pass. How long did it take you to begin to eat normally ? Weeks later? What did you eat ?

srh4jc
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2014
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 7/21/2014 6:56 PM (GMT -6)   
I am curious: did anyone have abdominal pain (near the sternum) and it seemed like your upper belly was bloated all the time? I used to have a flatish stomach until this kicked up a few years ago. The hiatal hernia has always been there too. What's new is the stricture.

I also have pain in the right upper quadrant of my abdomen on a consistent basis and was told that was from gastroparesis. However, they made me lay on a table while I tried to digest eggs for 90 minutes! I NEVER lay down after eating so it's no wonder to me that my test came out as delayed gastric emptying. The first one I had, they let me get up and walk around. That was was deemed normal! Any one else have this?

RV Guy
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2014
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 7/22/2014 8:55 AM (GMT -6)   
So glad to find a positive forum about Nissen FP!

I had my first wrap in 1995 after almost 20 years of heartburn and aspirating almost nightly waking up unable to get my breath. Even meds (Zantac & Mylanta) which were the best meds back then gave me little relief. I was 41 when I had the open surgery and it was very successful. Recovery was not easy and we got no help from the Doctor. I was in the hospital for 8 days and the hospital didn't know how to care for me either, but we struggled through and enjoyed 15 trouble free years. I could eat most anything without any problems.

However because I waited so long to have the wrap, aspirating left me with 13 cm of Barrett's which required an endoscopy every other year. In 2010, my Barrett's turned to cancer and I began a new treatment at Baylor Medical Hospital in Dallas, Tx called a halo 360 to remove the Barrett's and cancer. Dr. James Burdick has performed this treatment 12 times on my esophagus and has been able to remove all the Barrett's and cancer which has saved my esophagus. Each treatment required three months of recovery but it was worth it to be cancer free.

Although the treatments have been successful, I have ended up with another hiatal hernia and am scheduled for a second Nissan on August 12th, so here we go again. This time however I have this great forum that has reminded me of what to expect and how to prepare for this surgery.

Thanks again for all the positive posts. It really does help.

dencha
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2009
Total Posts : 7188
   Posted 7/22/2014 10:03 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi RV Guy,

Welcome to the Healing Well yeah yeah yeahWrapped Club! yeah yeah yeah Glad you've joined us! Thanks for sharing your story, and good luck with your redo! We have several members who belong to the "Redo Club", and I'm sure they'll be happy to share their experiences and tips with you!

Happy your found us!
Best wishes,
Denise

GERD/Heartburn Moderator
Nissen Fundoplication 2/09
Allergy/Asthma

"Whatever you fight, you strengthen, and what you resist, persists.”

“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”

“Accept - then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”
Eckhart Tolle
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