Can an exposure to one food allergen cause additional food allergies?

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bluesky81
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2014
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 10/26/2014 10:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Hey everyone. I am new to this forum and I wanted to share my story and get any opinions. I apologize in advance that my post is lengthy.

My history with food allergies has been nonexistent…I have never had a known food allergy. I do have some of the more 'typical' allergies including cats, dogs, mold, dust mites, grass, olive trees. I have taken one allergy pill a day (Claritin or Zyrtec) and that has been enough to keep my allergies in check.

I am 25 years old and in general I eat a wide variety of foods. Approximately 3 weeks ago, I started adding pea protein to my smoothies. The same day that I started adding it to my smoothies my body became "itchy." Here are a couple of additional pieces of information:
1) I never even imagined that something like pea protein (something that was supposed to be so healthy for me) would cause an allergy. It took me a while to put two and two together, so I ended up using pea protein (one large scoop/day) for a full 7 days before I made the connection.
2) When I originally started having my symptoms, I was telling people (including my doctor) that I was itchy. I later realized that this term was incorrect. I was not itching per say (itching my skin gave me no relief, hydrocortisone did not help, oatmeal baths did not help, etc). Rather, it was like a bunch of pin prick sensations, mainly on my legs, but also some on my arms. When I would get these sensations, I would have to put some pressure on them to make them go away. If I just tried to ignore them, I would end up twitching. This make sleeping incredibly difficult for a while because the sensations were happening so often (I would get one on my right shin, then my other shin, then my arm, then my thigh, then my shin…you get the picture)

Anyways, after speaking with my doctor about the use of pea protein and these pin prick sensations, she explained it like this: She said that my immune system was unsure how to react to this invader and it was sending out nerve signals (hence the need to put pressure on the spots where I felt the pin prick sensation for relief) like crazy. She told me that it could take some time for my immune system to readjust.

It has been 2 full weeks since I stopped taking the pea protein. My symptoms have decreased significantly (I am finally able to sleep!), yet they haven't completely subsided. I have now noticed that many other foods are starting to impact me. My question is, do you think that my immune system is still readjusting and there are many foods that could be potentially bothering it while it is regaining strength, or, is it possible that this pea protein allergy brought about additional food allergies (I don't even know if that is possible)?

Sally Walker
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2014
Total Posts : 29
   Posted 11/6/2014 3:11 AM (GMT -6)   
Avoiding exposure to peas is considered the most effective treatment for a pea allergy. If you experience an allergic reaction to peas when you eat or touch them, talk to your doctor about allergy testing for an accurate diagnosis. Your body creates a defense system to fight off the pea proteins because it does not recognize them as safe.

TroubledTurds
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2004
Total Posts : 8316
   Posted 11/6/2014 7:03 AM (GMT -6)   
I don't know if your doc is right or not, but her thoughts sound reasonable - and I totally agree that time is the biggest factor in stuff like this - we understandably want things to resolve quickly - unfortunately, our bodies have a different idea -
diagnosed with pancolitis december 21, 2003
in submission - 2 years no meds
current supplements: vit D, cal/mag, Wild Harvest Inflamma Shield -
no gluten, rice, corn, or soy & limited sugar - just good, healthy food, lots of all natural well water, exercise, sleep as much as possible & enjoy this great life that God has blessed me with -

Alcie
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 4978
   Posted 11/7/2014 6:29 PM (GMT -6)   
Google what else to avoid if you have a pea allergy. Peas are legumes, like lentils and soybeans.

Did your allergist say this reaction could go away? Maybe it was only because of the large quantity of protein you ingested.

I sure hope it will calm down because soybeans are in everything as fillers! While you're waiting, read labels!

Valenh
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2014
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 11/8/2014 2:44 AM (GMT -6)   
Hello!

Mayo Clinic recommends that people with known pea allergy wear medical bracelet, read packaged labels, and asked about the ingredients of foods when dining out. When in doubt, it is best not to eat the food.

Mild symptoms can be treated by oral antihistamine but if the symptoms persist, you must consult your doctor to get the correct diagnosis.

bluesky81
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2014
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 11/8/2014 8:01 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for all the responses!

I stopped taking the pea protein and after a month, my symptoms have calmed down significantly. Unfortunately, the symptoms have not gone away 100%, so I am trying to figure out if my body is still readjusting, or if I have somehow developed additional food allergies.

Do you think that it is possible that this exposure to pea protein has brought on new food allergies? I have never had food allergies before this incident. Prior to me taking the pea protein, I ate beans regularly, but now I don't think my body can handle them.

I got a blood test and my iron, Vit B12, and Vit D were all within the normal range (but slightly towards the lower end of the normal range), so doc doesn't think any of those are playing a factor. Something with my liver (shows up as ALT SGPT on my lab results) was slightly elevated at 50, which was a little odd because I do not drink (maybe a few drinks a year max), have never smoked, am not overweight, and haven't done drugs or had multiple sexual partners (Doc asked those questions to make sure I didn't have hepatitis)…so we are going to follow up with that.

I've decided that it is within my best interest to partake in an elimination diet to figure out what my triggers are. I hopefully will get a referral to an allergist as well.

Also my hay-fever type allergies have been terrible the last month. I find myself constantly itching my nose, even though I am taking my daily Claritin (I recently switched to Claritin from Zyrtec), Singular pill, and nasal spray. Do you think this is related, or just a coincidence?

TroubledTurds
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2004
Total Posts : 8316
   Posted 11/9/2014 7:18 AM (GMT -6)   
I don't know if this is true for everyone, but if my hay-fever type allergies are bugging me, other things are affected too -
diagnosed with pancolitis december 21, 2003
in submission - 2 years no meds
current supplements: vit D, cal/mag, Wild Harvest Inflamma Shield -
no gluten, rice, corn, or soy & limited sugar - just good, healthy food, lots of all natural well water, exercise, sleep as much as possible & enjoy this great life that God has blessed me with -
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