Don’t fear a colonoscopy

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worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 9/28/2017 2:15 AM (GMT -7)   
I wish to contribute and make a hopefully helpful post for other people who may be in a comparable situation I found myself in.

**IF YOU WISH TO SKIP MY SMALL BACKSTORY, SCROLL DOWN TO THE NEXT LINE OF ASTERISKS (STARS)**

I’m a 30 year old male and a long-time sufferer of panic disorder, general anxiety disorder, depression, agoraphobia, hypochondrias, and mild obsessive compulsive disorder.

I’ve gone through many stages in my life of developing symptoms that frighten me, googling these symptoms, convincing myself of having the worst possible diseases associated with such symptoms, all resulting in my worrying myself sick thus intensifying the already present symptoms or causing new ones to surface.

Multiple trips to a number of different doctors often do little to ease the anxiety. The act of even going to the doctors is panic-inducing. Far worse is getting tests done. I fear the tests themselves, as well as, the results.

I’ve had many, many medical tests over the years. Far more than any 30 year old without anxiety would have. One test I always avoided, however, was a colonoscopy for obvious reasons. Sure, blood tests and CAT scans are scary but the perceived horror of a colonoscopy is on an entirely different level.

******************

I’ve had fears of cancer in the past. Of all possible cancers, colorectal cancer stands out as being the one I’ve had the most anxiety about. In the news it’s been reported that colon and anal cancer rates have been significantly rising in young people. You can imagine the sheer terror I experienced when I saw blood on my stool.

I chickened out of a colonoscopy before back in 2009 when I had blood on my stool then. Thankfully, the bleeding stopped but it reoccurred now in 2017.

I’m the biggest wuss, worry wort, scaredy cat, or whatever synonym out there. If you think you have more anxiety and fear about medical procedures, diseases, death, or the like than me then I’d be happy to strongly disagree with you.

With that said, I went through with and successfully completed a test feared by many (anxiety disorder sufferer or not alike): the dreaded colonoscopy.

I’m writing this post for other people out there, old or young, worrying themselves sick about the bowel preparation, the sedation, the scoping, and all else involved with a colonoscopy. It honestly wasn’t as bad as I thought, anticipated, or expected.

If you or your doctor think a colonoscopy may be appropriate for you then I’m here to encourage you to get diagnosed if you’re having symptoms or get screened if you’re of age because really it was no where near as terrible as my anxious mind made it out to be. This is coming from someone who brought their entire family and significant other to the procedure with them... from someone who was physically shaking with fear... whose voice was stuttering and shaky so much so that the nurses took notice... someone who urinated themselves a little out of fear while waiting on the hospital bed to be wheeled in... someone who was administered DOUBLE the normal dosage of sedation and, despite not getting a single second of sleep the entire night beforehand, surprised the doctor and nurses by being so anxious that it didn’t make me sleep.

What I’m trying to say is: if I can make it through a colonoscopy then I 100% KNOW that you, YES YOU, can too. When I read similar posts as mine I did the same thing that you’re probably doing now. You’re blowing this post off and thinking that you have a worse case of anxiety than me (you don’t) or that your experience will be totally different and the worst possible outcome will occur. I thought the same and I’m fine. I overcame my fears in order to get what we anxiety-sufferers covet most: peace of mind. You can do it.

Post Edited (worrywort87) : 9/28/2017 3:29:26 AM (GMT-6)


Scaredy Cat
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 27127
   Posted 9/28/2017 8:41 AM (GMT -7)   
W.W.,

Thank you so much for sharing your personal story with us regarding facing your fears.

I know it inspired me...and will no doubt help countless other readers!

I am so proud of, and impressed by your courage.😊

I am assuming that your results came back favorably...and hoping that this can now be a big step in moving forward with your anxiety management plan!!

Peace and progress,

S.C.
Moderator:Anxiety/Panic

"Courage is not the abscence of fear, it is feeling afraid and doing it anyway!"

"Worrying does not empty tomorrow of its troubles...it empties today of its strength."
Corrie Ten Boom

Panic Syndrome recovery due to CBT

super20dan
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2014
Total Posts : 862
   Posted 9/28/2017 5:14 PM (GMT -7)   
thanks also for this advice. I am due to get one soon and I have plenty to worry about as I am 60 and never had one and also had prostate cancer in jan of this year. I just kept putting it off as I was just to busy with my business to take the time off

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 9/28/2017 6:19 PM (GMT -7)   
Even if you do end up having something, it is far better to get it caught early. I know how tempting it is to forgo a test as intimidating as a colonoscopy but remind yourself that the outcomes, either way, can ONLY be good. Either you'll get peace of mind or you will nip a bad situation in the bud. And truly, the anticipatory anxiety I felt was completely unwarranted. Do the test.

Park12
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 2782
   Posted 9/30/2017 1:14 PM (GMT -7)   
Totally agree with this post!! I had my colonoscopy 3 years ago thinking it would find nothing, but I ended up finding polyps! Small ones, but ones had they gone undiscovered would’ve become cancer!

I’m due for my next colonoscopy in a couple months and I’m not a bit nervous for the procedure! Maybe a little nervous to find more polyps, but no matter what they would be in the early stages again!
36 yr old female, mom to two sweet miracles and wife to one wonderful man. GAD/Panic Diorder, Health Anxiety, Insomnia & IBS-D

"Do not anticipate trouble, or worry about what may never happen. Keep in the sunlight." Benjamin Franklin

RISEagainst
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2017
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 9/30/2017 7:21 PM (GMT -7)   
Worry wort, if your anxiety was as bad as you said it was, how could you go from 2009 to 2017 without knowing why you were bleeding from your butt given your fears of colorectal cancer? My anxiety works like this - I have to know what's wrong or I'll think about it all of the time and it will negatively affect my life. I couldn't last 8 years not knowing.
Diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis (proctitis) July 26 2011. After a few minor flares my GI disappeared and I got worse and my last 3 flares were Pancolitis.
After spending 2 weeks in the hospital I decided to have surgery. First of 2 Jpouch surgeries was September 2nd 2016. Takedown was February 1st 2017.
It's not easy but what is? Well, other than having a healthy colon.

kellyinCali
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 292
   Posted 9/30/2017 7:30 PM (GMT -7)   
Courage and strength to you, worrywort.

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/1/2017 11:17 PM (GMT -7)   
Park12, good luck on your colonoscopy. It's better to get it done. That's for sure.

RISEagainst, I was originally going to get a colonoscopy back in 2009 but I started googling the extremely rare complications associated with the procedure and chickened out of it. The reasons my colorectal cancer fears left me in 2009 are multiple. I had seen many doctors who all told me it was hemorrhoids and even had one say that he could feel the hemorrhoids upon digital rectal examination. Looking back, I think he may have lied to me because, usually, they are not palpable upon examination. However, believing a doctor found evidence of hemorrhoids helped to ease my fears slightly. Also, I was much younger then than I am now so the chance of it being colorectal cancer was significantly lower than it would be today. I also had not seen the studies that were reporting the sudden rise in colorectal cancer in young people so I was under the impression that the chance of me having colorectal cancer was, in fact, astronomically low. I now know that, while still very rare, the numbers are going up and that it does happen more frequently than many doctors lead you to believe. The most significant reason, however, is that I stopped bleeding altogether and was told the bleeding in cancer would either get worse or not stop. I now know that to be false but I believed it back then. Also, I decided that the risk of the test outweighed the benefits. I thought I had a higher risk of complications from a colonoscopy than of having cancer and with no more symptoms I just chalked the bleeding up to a benign condition. I believe a 50-year-old WITHOUT colorectal cancer symptoms has a higher chance of having the disease than a 22-year-old WITH colorectal cancer symptoms. Lastly, I was so scared of the procedure itself that I more than welcomed any excuse not to have it done.

KellyinCali, thank you.

Post Edited (worrywort87) : 10/2/2017 2:01:30 AM (GMT-6)


RISEagainst
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2017
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 10/2/2017 11:17 AM (GMT -7)   
worrywort87 said...
Park12, good luck on your colonoscopy. It's better to get it done. That's for sure.

RISEagainst, I was originally going to get a colonoscopy back in 2009 but I started googling the extremely rare complications associated with the procedure and chickened out of it. The reasons my colorectal cancer fears left me in 2009 are multiple. I had seen many doctors who all told me it was hemorrhoids and even had one say that he could feel the hemorrhoids upon digital rectal examination. Looking back, I think he may have lied to me because, usually, they are not palpable upon examination. However, believing a doctor found evidence of hemorrhoids helped to ease my fears slightly. Also, I was much younger then than I am now so the chance of it being colorectal cancer was significantly lower than it would be today. I also had not seen the studies that were reporting the sudden rise in colorectal cancer in young people so I was under the impression that the chance of me having colorectal cancer was, in fact, astronomically low. I now know that, while still very rare, the numbers are going up and that it does happen more frequently than many doctors lead you to believe. The most significant reason, however, is that I stopped bleeding altogether and was told the bleeding in cancer would either get worse or not stop. I now know that to be false but I believed it back then. Also, I decided that the risk of the test outweighed the benefits. I thought I had a higher risk of complications from a colonoscopy than of having cancer and with no more symptoms I just chalked the bleeding up to a benign condition. I believe a 50-year-old WITHOUT colorectal cancer symptoms has a higher chance of having the disease than a 22-year-old WITH colorectal cancer symptoms. Lastly, I was so scared of the procedure itself that I more than welcomed any excuse not to have it done.

KellyinCali, thank you.


All this worry about colon cancer and you weren't concerned at all about inflammatory bowel disease? Which can be as serious as cancer.

medved
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 1094
   Posted 10/2/2017 11:39 AM (GMT -7)   
A friend who is a GI doc, and has done thousands of scopes, told me:

"patients really should not be worried about a colonoscopy, and if they knew how incredibly easy and routine they are for any experienced doc, they would not be worried. I could do one with my eyes closed at this point. But don't worry, I don't do that!"

The prep is an annoyance, but the procedure is a breeze, assuming you don't decline the sedation.
I am not a medical professional, and nothing I write is medical advice.

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/2/2017 11:48 AM (GMT -7)   
RISEagainst said...
worrywort87 said...
Park12, good luck on your colonoscopy. It's better to get it done. That's for sure.

RISEagainst, I was originally going to get a colonoscopy back in 2009 but I started googling the extremely rare complications associated with the procedure and chickened out of it. The reasons my colorectal cancer fears left me in 2009 are multiple. I had seen many doctors who all told me it was hemorrhoids and even had one say that he could feel the hemorrhoids upon digital rectal examination. Looking back, I think he may have lied to me because, usually, they are not palpable upon examination. However, believing a doctor found evidence of hemorrhoids helped to ease my fears slightly. Also, I was much younger then than I am now so the chance of it being colorectal cancer was significantly lower than it would be today. I also had not seen the studies that were reporting the sudden rise in colorectal cancer in young people so I was under the impression that the chance of me having colorectal cancer was, in fact, astronomically low. I now know that, while still very rare, the numbers are going up and that it does happen more frequently than many doctors lead you to believe. The most significant reason, however, is that I stopped bleeding altogether and was told the bleeding in cancer would either get worse or not stop. I now know that to be false but I believed it back then. Also, I decided that the risk of the test outweighed the benefits. I thought I had a higher risk of complications from a colonoscopy than of having cancer and with no more symptoms I just chalked the bleeding up to a benign condition. I believe a 50-year-old WITHOUT colorectal cancer symptoms has a higher chance of having the disease than a 22-year-old WITH colorectal cancer symptoms. Lastly, I was so scared of the procedure itself that I more than welcomed any excuse not to have it done.

KellyinCali, thank you.


All this worry about colon cancer and you weren't concerned at all about inflammatory bowel disease? Which can be as serious as cancer.


No doctor had mentioned inflammatory bowel disease to me in 2009 and the only symptom I had was blood on my stool and mild abdominal pain that was probably due to anxiety. I did not have any diarrhea whatsoever. Also, I did not see IBD as being as serious as colorectal cancer. I was completely fixated on having cancer so IBD did not even cross my mind. Most importantly, my symptoms completely stopped. Once the symptoms stopped my anxiety moved on to worrying about something else.

Post Edited (worrywort87) : 10/2/2017 12:55:40 PM (GMT-6)


NiceCupOfTea
Elite Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 10096
   Posted 10/2/2017 12:32 PM (GMT -7)   
RISEagainst said...


All this worry about colon cancer and you weren't concerned at all about inflammatory bowel disease? Which can be as serious as cancer.


Blood in stool in young adults has a 99.9% chance of being one of two things:

1. Bleeding hemmies (more likely if the blood is occasional and there is no diarrhoea)
2. IBD

worrywort87 said...
Also, I did not see IBD as being as serious as colorectal cancer.


Depends on the IBD and how severe it is. It can have life-threatening complications, which I've had (and survived to tell the tale obviously).

RISEagainst
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2017
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 10/2/2017 1:27 PM (GMT -7)   
worrywort87 said...
RISEagainst said...
worrywort87 said...
Park12, good luck on your colonoscopy. It's better to get it done. That's for sure.

RISEagainst, I was originally going to get a colonoscopy back in 2009 but I started googling the extremely rare complications associated with the procedure and chickened out of it. The reasons my colorectal cancer fears left me in 2009 are multiple. I had seen many doctors who all told me it was hemorrhoids and even had one say that he could feel the hemorrhoids upon digital rectal examination. Looking back, I think he may have lied to me because, usually, they are not palpable upon examination. However, believing a doctor found evidence of hemorrhoids helped to ease my fears slightly. Also, I was much younger then than I am now so the chance of it being colorectal cancer was significantly lower than it would be today. I also had not seen the studies that were reporting the sudden rise in colorectal cancer in young people so I was under the impression that the chance of me having colorectal cancer was, in fact, astronomically low. I now know that, while still very rare, the numbers are going up and that it does happen more frequently than many doctors lead you to believe. The most significant reason, however, is that I stopped bleeding altogether and was told the bleeding in cancer would either get worse or not stop. I now know that to be false but I believed it back then. Also, I decided that the risk of the test outweighed the benefits. I thought I had a higher risk of complications from a colonoscopy than of having cancer and with no more symptoms I just chalked the bleeding up to a benign condition. I believe a 50-year-old WITHOUT colorectal cancer symptoms has a higher chance of having the disease than a 22-year-old WITH colorectal cancer symptoms. Lastly, I was so scared of the procedure itself that I more than welcomed any excuse not to have it done.

KellyinCali, thank you.


All this worry about colon cancer and you weren't concerned at all about inflammatory bowel disease? Which can be as serious as cancer.


No doctor had mentioned inflammatory bowel disease to me in 2009 and the only symptom I had was blood on my stool and mild abdominal pain that was probably due to anxiety. I did not have any diarrhea whatsoever. Also, I did not see IBD as being as serious as colorectal cancer. I was completely fixated on having cancer so IBD did not even cross my mind. Most importantly, my symptoms completely stopped. Once the symptoms stopped my anxiety moved on to worrying about something else.


I'm a little bit confused. First you say you did not see ibd as being serious enough and then you say ibd did not even cross your mind. Which is it?

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/2/2017 1:32 PM (GMT -7)   
RISEagainst said...
worrywort87 said...
RISEagainst said...
worrywort87 said...
Park12, good luck on your colonoscopy. It's better to get it done. That's for sure.

RISEagainst, I was originally going to get a colonoscopy back in 2009 but I started googling the extremely rare complications associated with the procedure and chickened out of it. The reasons my colorectal cancer fears left me in 2009 are multiple. I had seen many doctors who all told me it was hemorrhoids and even had one say that he could feel the hemorrhoids upon digital rectal examination. Looking back, I think he may have lied to me because, usually, they are not palpable upon examination. However, believing a doctor found evidence of hemorrhoids helped to ease my fears slightly. Also, I was much younger then than I am now so the chance of it being colorectal cancer was significantly lower than it would be today. I also had not seen the studies that were reporting the sudden rise in colorectal cancer in young people so I was under the impression that the chance of me having colorectal cancer was, in fact, astronomically low. I now know that, while still very rare, the numbers are going up and that it does happen more frequently than many doctors lead you to believe. The most significant reason, however, is that I stopped bleeding altogether and was told the bleeding in cancer would either get worse or not stop. I now know that to be false but I believed it back then. Also, I decided that the risk of the test outweighed the benefits. I thought I had a higher risk of complications from a colonoscopy than of having cancer and with no more symptoms I just chalked the bleeding up to a benign condition. I believe a 50-year-old WITHOUT colorectal cancer symptoms has a higher chance of having the disease than a 22-year-old WITH colorectal cancer symptoms. Lastly, I was so scared of the procedure itself that I more than welcomed any excuse not to have it done.

KellyinCali, thank you.


All this worry about colon cancer and you weren't concerned at all about inflammatory bowel disease? Which can be as serious as cancer.


No doctor had mentioned inflammatory bowel disease to me in 2009 and the only symptom I had was blood on my stool and mild abdominal pain that was probably due to anxiety. I did not have any diarrhea whatsoever. Also, I did not see IBD as being as serious as colorectal cancer. I was completely fixated on having cancer so IBD did not even cross my mind. Most importantly, my symptoms completely stopped. Once the symptoms stopped my anxiety moved on to worrying about something else.


I'm a little bit confused. First you say you did not see ibd as being serious enough and then you say ibd did not even cross your mind. Which is it?


It is both. I googled the symptoms of rectal bleeding and saw IBD, hemorrhoids, fissures, and others. So while I did have the knowledge of IBD being a possibility it was so insignificant to me that it did not cross my mind.

NiceCupOfTea
Elite Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 10096
   Posted 10/2/2017 1:50 PM (GMT -7)   
If you actually got IBD, you would stop treating it as nothing, believe me!!

No wonder IBD gets virtually no funding, if this is the common view of it. Bloody hell, there have been times when I would rather have had cancer - if you find that offensive, so be it. You haven't been through what I have.

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/2/2017 1:58 PM (GMT -7)   
NiceCupOfTea said...
If you actually got IBD, you would stop treating it as nothing, believe me!!

No wonder IBD gets virtually no funding, if this is the common view of it. Bloody hell, there have been times when I would rather have had cancer - if you find that offensive, so be it. You haven't been through what I have.


I don't find it offensive whatsoever. I'm just being honest. I'm not going to sugarcoat my story. All I can do is tell the truth pertaining to my personal experience. When I read the list of possible diseases associated with rectal bleeding and I see a deadly condition there THAT'S the condition my anxiety latches onto. The catastrophic thinking associated with anxiety causes me to focus on the worst possibility which would be symptomatic cancer indicating advanced disease. I sympathize with IBD sufferers and am in no way making light of the condition but I'm not going to alter the details of my personal story to make others feel better. I'm going to tell the truth.

By the way, I don't know whether or not I have IBD yet. The biopsy results have not come back. I very well may have IBD.

NiceCupOfTea
Elite Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 10096
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:18 PM (GMT -7)   
I'm just being honest

Right. In that case you won't mind if I plainly tell you you don't have the first clue about IBD.
Dx Crohn's in June 2000. (Yay skull)
Tried: 5-ASAs, azathioprine, 6MP, Remicade, methotrexate, Humira, diets.
1st surgery 20/2/13 - subtotal colectomy with end ileostomy.
2nd surgery 10/7/15 - ileorectal anastomosis. Stoma reversed and ileum connected to the rectum.
Current status: Chronic flare. Do I have any other kind?
Current meds: 50mg 6MP; Entyvio (started 3/11/16)

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:26 PM (GMT -7)   
NiceCupOfTea said...
I'm just being honest

Right. In that case you won't mind if I plainly tell you you don't have the first clue about IBD.


Tell me anything you like. I don't mind. Is there anything else you'd like to say?

I'm sorry that I've clearly offended some IBD sufferers by speaking out about my personal experience in the hope of helping others. I genuinely feared dying of cancer in a short span of time. Explain why I would logically care about having IBD when having a fear like that over my head.

I'm not trying to make light of IBD or attack those who suffer. I may have the disease myself. I do not yet know.

NiceCupOfTea
Elite Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 10096
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:31 PM (GMT -7)   
Yes, there is. Severe IBD makes you wish you were dying. And even when you aren't acutely flaring, the prospect of chronic pain, diarrhoea and urgency for the rest of your life hangs over your head like a constant raincloud. Not to mention the endless tests - I've had 6 colonoscopies and the only reason it isn't more than that is because I had my colon removed 4 and a half years ago.

I don't fear death because death is the end of pain. No, I'm not suicidal, I'm not going to do anything to bring death about. But that's what IBD has reduced me to.

But hey, it's so "insignificant" after all.

PS: I've also been battling with chronic uveitis for the last year, which every opthalmologist I've seen say is related to the Crohn's. That's an eye condition which can lead to blindness.

Post Edited (NiceCupOfTea) : 10/2/2017 3:34:28 PM (GMT-6)


worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:39 PM (GMT -7)   
I didn't say it was insignificant to you, I said it was "insignificant TO ME." And what I meant by that statement was that the prospect of having advanced cancer was far worse to me than having mild IBD. Does that not make sense to you?

I've had my share of racing home in my car with extreme lower abdominal pain trying to get to the bathroom, the anxiety of not knowing where the nearest bathroom is and not wanting to go out because of that fear, and many other experiences.

I'm sorry that you have a severe case of IBD. Would you have preferred for me to lie about how I felt?

RISEagainst
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2017
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:51 PM (GMT -7)   
worrywort87 said...
NiceCupOfTea said...
I'm just being honest

Right. In that case you won't mind if I plainly tell you you don't have the first clue about IBD.


Tell me anything you like. I don't mind. Is there anything else you'd like to say?

I'm sorry that I've clearly offended some IBD sufferers by speaking out about my personal experience in the hope of helping others. I genuinely feared dying of cancer in a short span of time. Explain why I would logically care about having IBD when having a fear like that over my head.

I'm not trying to make light of IBD or attack those who suffer. I may have the disease myself. I do not yet know.


You dont have it.

RISEagainst
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2017
Total Posts : 34
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:54 PM (GMT -7)   
worrywort87 said...
I didn't say it was insignificant to you, I said it was "insignificant TO ME." And what I meant by that statement was that the prospect of having advanced cancer was far worse to me than having mild IBD. Does that not make sense to you?

I've had my share of racing home in my car with extreme lower abdominal pain trying to get to the bathroom, the anxiety of not knowing where the nearest bathroom is and not wanting to go out because of that fear, and many other experiences.

I'm sorry that you have a severe case of IBD. Would you have preferred for me to lie about how I felt?


Well with someone who has anxiety about cancer like you even if you had mild ibd you'd still likely be on meds that can cause cancer. I'm sure that would eat you up inside. Why don't you just tell the truth, that you knew nothing about IBD. If you knew about ibd someone with anxiety like you would be terrified of it.

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:54 PM (GMT -7)   
RISEagainst said...
worrywort87 said...
NiceCupOfTea said...
I'm just being honest

Right. In that case you won't mind if I plainly tell you you don't have the first clue about IBD.


Tell me anything you like. I don't mind. Is there anything else you'd like to say?

I'm sorry that I've clearly offended some IBD sufferers by speaking out about my personal experience in the hope of helping others. I genuinely feared dying of cancer in a short span of time. Explain why I would logically care about having IBD when having a fear like that over my head.

I'm not trying to make light of IBD or attack those who suffer. I may have the disease myself. I do not yet know.


You dont have it.


I don't understand why you think it is appropriate to diagnose me over the internet. I had inflammation and redness in my sigmoid colon and rectum where the biopsy was taken.

Scaredy Cat
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 27127
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:55 PM (GMT -7)   
Okay kiddies we all need to play nice in the sandbox.

Worry Wort meant no offense. No need to internalize or take anything as a personal slight.

We are here to support each other...not flame...which is clearly against the rules.

Be kind and respectful to those seeking answers. If you wish to educate someone...do it in a friendly and helpful manner.

S.C.
Moderator:Anxiety/Panic

"Courage is not the abscence of fear, it is feeling afraid and doing it anyway!"

"Worrying does not empty tomorrow of its troubles...it empties today of its strength."
Corrie Ten Boom

Panic Syndrome recovery due to CBT

worrywort87
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2013
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 10/2/2017 2:57 PM (GMT -7)   
RISEagainst said...
worrywort87 said...
I didn't say it was insignificant to you, I said it was "insignificant TO ME." And what I meant by that statement was that the prospect of having advanced cancer was far worse to me than having mild IBD. Does that not make sense to you?

I've had my share of racing home in my car with extreme lower abdominal pain trying to get to the bathroom, the anxiety of not knowing where the nearest bathroom is and not wanting to go out because of that fear, and many other experiences.

I'm sorry that you have a severe case of IBD. Would you have preferred for me to lie about how I felt?


Well with someone who has anxiety about cancer like you even if you had mild ibd you'd still likely be on meds that can cause cancer. I'm sure that would eat you up inside. Why don't you just tell the truth, that you knew nothing about IBD. If you knew about ibd someone with anxiety like you would be terrified of it.


Please indicate where I so much as implied to be knowledgeable about IBD.
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